Search: The Web Angelfire Report Abuse Previous | Top 100 | Next share: del.icio.us | digg | reddit | furl | facebook 69 WAYS TO MAKE MONEY WITHOUT LEAVING HOME 1. Service Businesses: Things you do for others; repairs, cleaning, child care, etc. 2. Products You Sell to Others; Business cards, names, shoes (7157231871). 3. Products You Can Make and Sell to Others: handicrafts, ceramics, jewelry. 4. Advertising Representative: sell ad space in publications of others, charge % fee. 5. Alternations, Sewing, Cleaning: Sewing, cleaning, anything to do with clothing and what people wear. 6. Auto Work: Repairs, cleaning, polishing, tuneups, etc. 7. Baking: Cakes, cookies, candies, etc. 8. Baking, Cooking Classes: Teach people what you know about baking, cooking, etc. 9. Bookkeeping, Accounting: Help others keep their books, accounting (8002234542) 10. Broker Services: Offer products and services of others to YOUR customers as a broker. 11. Business Consultant: Help others in running their businesses, guidance,, etc. 12. Business Skills Class: Teach others how to run a business, how to make and save money. 13. Childbirth Classes: teach new parents all they need to know, what to do and how. 14. Closeout and Odd Lot Items:Locate items that are not moving, buy at a discount. 15. Computer Services:Secretarial; services, typing, resumes, reports, manuscripts, etc. 16. Computer Training: Teach people what you know about computers. 17. Craft Instruction: Teach people what you know about craftmaking. 18. Dancing Lessons: Aerobic classes;popular dances, teach in your home, etc. 19. Dealerships:Sell programs and plans of others, sell their products, etc. 20. Discount Printing:Contact small printers offer their services toothers. 21. Distribution of Flyers, Circulars: Do it by mail for clients, charge a fee. 22. Editing,Advisor:Read manuscripts,reports. Edit them, reword sections before publications. 23. Equipment Repair:Take in all kinds of appliances and equipment. Service and repair them. 24. Financial Services: Take in all kinds of appliances and equipment. Service and repair them. 25. Freelance Writing:Articles, Dramas, Poems,etc. 26. Garden Goods for Sale: Sell corn,potatoes,flowers,melons, etc. 27. Ghost Writing:Sell your "way with words"toothers;help them to get it in print! 28. Gift Ideas, Wrapping:People need help in these areas and will pay for that help. 29. Hair Salon: Washing, Cutting, Styling, Coloring, Perms, etc. 30. Hair and Beauty Classes: Teach makeup techniques, hair styling;cutting,cutting, etc. 31. Hobby, Gift Ideas:There are thousands of different items you can sell. 32. Howto and MoneyMaking Books/Plans. 33. Import/Export:Learn from the pros;; give it a try; buy low there, sell high here! 34. Issue Your Own Publication or Newsletter: Charge ad rates, Subscriptions, etc. 35. List People for a Fee: Offer to list their name as wanting something, charge a fee; etc. 36. Laundry Service: Washing, Ironing, folding, etc. 37. Locator Service: Locate Jobs, Bargains, sources, discounts, buyers, etc. Mail Forwarding Service: Offer to forward mail, receive it at you address for others. 39. Mailing List Service: Compile and sell your customer names; rent and sell their names. 40. Mailorder Classes: teach people how to make money; save money; get rich' etc. 41. MultiLevel Opportunities: It's possible to make money this way, if you get enough people. Parties in Your Home: Help others plan and hold them, charge a fee, be a clown, etc. 43. Pet Care: Training, Grooming, Boarding. Pets inn, (800248PETS) 44. Phone and Answering Machine: Telephone Soliciting; Answering. 45. Photo Studio in Your Home: If you like photography; have camera; dark room, etc. 46. Piano & Music Instruction: Teach pupils in your home; teach what you know. 47. Plant Care; Rental: Take in plants, care for them. Gardener's Supply, (8028634798) 48. Publicity Service: Help others get the publicity they need, news releases. 49. Publish a Cook Book: Get help from cooks; offer to list their recipes. Charge per book. 50. Reminder Service: Remind people about important dates, events, using cards, phone, etc. 51. Rental Service: If you got it, rent it!. A backyard, a patio, shrubs, tools. 52. Reading, Reviewer: People are too busy to read all they need to; charge them for summary. 53. Researcher: Charge a fee to research a subject; charge for a written report. 54. Scholarship Assistance: Help students get financing. School Services (6097271700). 55. SelfImprovement Classes: Teach people what you know about losing weight; etc. 56. Sell By Mail Order: Ad specialties; Booklets; Reports, etc. 57. Sharpening Service: Take in saws, knives to be sharpened, etc. 58. Speaking, Reading, Recording: Sell your talents as speaker, reader, on tapes for the blind. 59. Start a Club: Sell Memberships in it; Charge monthly dues, issue a newsletter, etc. 60. Tapes  Videos: Buy in lots; sell; rebuy; resell. 61. Teach Various Subjects: Classes can be on How to do something, How to stop smoking, etc. 62. Tutoring: In_home Teaching; help students to catchup[; improve skills, etc. 63. Used whatever Store: Have used items for sale, take in; sell, rebuy, resell. Wedding Planner: Help young couples to plan theirs; what to order, when, etc. 65. Weight Loss Classes: How to lose weight; exercise; Diet, weight loss (3135532626). 66. Wholesalers; Sources of Supply: Publishers: Get their names, contact them for info. 67. Woodworking: Carpentry; Antique rebuilding; Repairs. 68. Write and Sell Books and Reports: Type up, copy and sell your own; sell works of others. 69. Yard, garage Sales: Sell what you no longer need or want; people will buy your junk! 107 GREAT PARTTIME BUSINESSES INTRODUCTION If you need more income and another job is not the answer, this listing was designed for you! We've prepared a selection of uptodate businesses that can be operated in or from your home on a parttime basis. Most of these businesses require no special training and relatively little investment. The most critical requirements are your:  willingness to work and  dedication to your business Look through these suggestions for subjects that sound interesting. Consider each as representative rather than specific. For example, if you know nothing about African Violets (#01) but are good with roses, by all means substitute roses for African Violets. And, don't overlook the possibility of blending these (or other) suggestions to form the ideal business combination. When you have decided on your business, check state and local requirements for licenses, permits and make arrangements for startup supplies. You will probably need business cards, a ledger and a rubber stamp with your company name and address. Although your beginning supplies should be adequate, they need not be fancy or expensive. Don't stock up too much as you will probably need to make adjustments as you learn the needs of your market. It is always a good idea to:  write out your business plan  an outline of what you intend to do and how you plan to go about it.  List what you will buy from whom, how much it costs, where it will be stored, how you will advertise, what price you will charge, your gross and estimated net profits and when you will reorder. Include everything you can think of that your business will involve. The action will "force" you to organize your business (in your mind as well as on paper) and greatly increase your chances for profit and success. In this (or any other) business, give careful thought to your capabilities and your potential market. Select something that you already know (or like and are willing to learn) and will stick to  that people in your area will pay for. Your product or service should be priced competitively, but at the level to yield a fair profit. This motivates customers to buy and you to work even harder! GOOD LUCK IN YOUR NEW BUSINESS! 107 GREAT PARTTIME BUSINESSES 01. AFRICAN VIOLETS. Specialize in the propagation and care of this popular indoor plant. Nurture, hybridize and sell when in full bloom. Carry accessories, such as pots, shelves and lighting. Keep a small but permanent ad in your local newspaper. 02. ALTERATIONS. Replace buttons, let out cuffs, shorten sleeves, turn collars, repair tears for clothing stores, laundries and cleaner who don't already offer this service. You can work for them or leave a price poster in their store. 03. ARROWHEADS. Collect, buy, sell and MAKE (with deer horn and clove) Indian arrowheads for hobbyists, displays and demonstrations. Sell instruction and/or information booklets and doityourself kits. Offer various types of flint. 04. AUTO PARTS REBUILDING. Work with garages and mechanics. Specialize in rebuilding one part (carburetors, master cylinders, electronic ignitions) for one or several makes. Install kits, ream and/or refit and guarantee all of your work. 05. AUTO TOUCHUP. Repair minor dents, cover rock chips, remove rust, polish, clean tires. Renew rubber and plastic, deodorize to help bring the best price or tradein. Advertise under Auto/Trucks For Sale, with a price (e.g. "From $25.00") 06. AUTO PAWN SHOP. Hold cars as collateral for shortterm loans. Hold the title (if clear) or, "buy" the car with a 30 day or so buyback price agreement or limited power of attorney. Check laws and obtain legal advice before proceeding! 07. AWNINGS, WINDOW. Design and install permanent and foldup fabric and or metal awnings for storefronts, patios, house windows, trailers and mobile homes. Offer a selection of materials, colors and prices. Advertise prices and benefits. 08. BABY DOLLS. Create dolls with fine wigs from client baby's own baby hair as keepsake dolls. Try to get cloth from baby's actual clothes to make similar looking outfits for the doll (work from a picture if possible). Put in glass case. 09. BARBEQUE. Use a portable (trailer?) meat smoker to take to fairs, parades and festivals. Have a supply of prepared sandwiches ready, but always have a fire AND AROMA (throw in a little suet or sauce) going to attract more business. 10. BELT BUCKLES. Stock a selection of belt buckles for truckers, workers, etc. Have special designs and insignias made for local groups. Arrange to offer good prices on leather belts as well (import some to sell at attractive prices). 11. BENCH RENTALS. Build busstop style benches and with city permission, place them free of cost to the city at various busstops. Pay a sign painter to apply advertisements for clients who pay you by the month for the ads and space. 12. BIRD TRAINING TAPES. Make endless or autoreverse tapes to teach bird to talk, whistle or sing. Sell or rent the necessary equipment to mount in or near cages. Charge extra to record the bird owner's own voice giving the instructions on tape. 13. BIRDHOUSE BUILDING. Build and decorate fine, scientifically designed birdhouses and feeders for birds native to your area as well as those that migrate to or through your area. Make up little info folders for each model. 14. BIRTHDAY LISTS. Compile birthday (anniversary, etc.) of people in your area to rent as mailing lists to local merchants. Or, contract to mail out cards each year on behalf of the merchants. Have a set minimum, as $25 for 50 mailings. 15. BREAD SPECIALTIES. Bake unusual or otherwise unavailable varieties of home made breads: oat bran, low calorie, ethnic, salt free. Keep a small ad in paper, take orders for loaves fresh from your kitchen and/or deliver fresh to stores. 16. BRONZING. Bronze (or pearlize) baby shoes etc. Make mementoes, awards and trophies. Design plaques and unique bases with emphasis on local needs such as Chamber of Commerce of company awards. Arrange for engraved plates on plaques. 17. BRUSH CLEARING. With you truck, tractor and shredder, contract to clear brush and small trees from lots and acreage. Haul off excess debris or use a composter to recycle and sell organic refuse. Offer to drag or level the cleared area. 18. BUSINESS EQUIPMENT. Buy surplus equipment from bankruptcy sales and auctions. Store and cleanup, but do not repair (let buyer do that). Advertise bargain prices for qualified buyers and sell at double or triple your investment. 19. CEMENT BLOCKS. Mold small orders of standard or custom blocks (building, stepping stones, curbs) in all shapes and colors. Make molds when necessary of plywood and tin. Take orders, sell form your "yard" and through nurseries. 20. TRUCK LETTERING. Use precut, selfstick vinyl letters to produce long lasting, professional truck signs (no art talent required). Use chalk snap lines to mark lines and left, peel and press in place. Stock and offer a variety of letters. 21. CEMENT MARKERS. Make "engraved" cement or liquid marble markers and signs. Mold "backwards" letters into various colors and textures of plasticlike cement for carved in effect. Polish molded marker into a professional looking stone. 22. CHAIR CANING. Use cane, plastic or other interesting materials to weave seats and backs onto casual and picturesque chairs for clients. Buy old chairs with promise at bargain prices to reglue, refinish, recane and sell at a profit. 23. CHINA AND GLASS DEALER. Collect and deal in antique and interesting china and glass items. Buy at auctions, antique stores, private and public sales and through your advertisements. Deduct travel expenses for buying trips and visits. 24. CITY LOT CLEANUP. Work with the city to learn of lots that must be cleaned up. Contract to do the required work on lots they designate (city adds bill to owner's taxes). Contact absentee (or local) owners to avoid future city actions. 25. CLIENT LISTINGS. On your computer, input and maintain customer (or business) information: customer info, purchases, credit records, employee information, etc. Provide periodic and custom sorts (including mailing lists) to clients. 26. COLLECTION AGENT. Represent one or more commercial agencies (don't tell one about another, though). Solicit delinquent accounts for collection from local businesses for a percentage of monies the agencies collect. 27. COIN SEARCHING. Buy rolls of coins from banks (whatever denomination you can afford). Search through them for coins worth over face value. Keep all of these and replace with "regular' coins and trade back in. Best in small towns! 28. COLLECTIONS. Accumulate collectables (glass, matchbook, baseball cards, comic books). Make up (from common specimens) starter collections to sell to beginners. Sell valuable pieces individually to collectors (some you got started). 29. CONCESSION BOOTH. Operate a booth or stand at a recreation area, flea market, shopping mall or parking lot. Sell your own products and/or consignment items. Carry some attractively priced items just to attract more customers. 30. CURB PAINTING. With a stencil and fastdry black spray paint house numbers on all curbs in a city block then go back and request a $2$5 "donation" from occupants. Pass out circulars the day before announcing your service. 31. CUSTOM CLOTHING DESIGNS. Paint, block print or transfer unique or custom designs onto items of clothing: smocks, TShirts, jackets and fabrics to be made into clothing. Use designs, illustrations, cartoons, things of interest locally! 32. DESERT GLASS. Collect and sell sunbaked, weatherbeaten glass in interesting colors. Make your own synthetic version by baking and/or sandblasting suitable objects with inexpensive equipment. Advertise your materials in hobby magazines. 33. DISTRESS SALES. Buy household items cheap at auctions and closeout sales. Clean them up and sell as your own right out of your living room because you need the money (e.g. to pay a fine), and never because you have new or better things! 34. DOLL HOUSE FURNITURE. Make exquisite, scale furniture for doll houses. Or, buy inexpensive imported items and upgrade them. Normally, a little reenforcing, sanding and a coat of stain or polyurethane makes all the difference in the world! 35. DRIFTWOOD ART. With sandblaster, power or hand held wire brush form and finish interesting pieces of driftwood (and other woods) into decorations, lamps, candle holders and plant mounts. Use deductible vacations to collect more driftwood. 36. ELECTROPLATING. Offer a chrome (and other) metal plating service in your shop. Advertise in the newspaper and list with auto, RV parts stores, auto restorers and body shops. Between jobs plate items to sell (ornaments, trophies etc.). 37. FENCE INSTALLATION. Install fences for private homeowners. List with hardware stores and keep a small ad in the paper. Expand to furnishing the materials for a single bid. Offer a variety of both functional and ornamental fences. 38. FISHING LURES. Use a flytying rig to tie flies and sell by the dozen to individuals, bait shops, sports and department stores. Design, manufacture and decorate fishing lures especially for waters in your area. Then advertise and expand! 39. FLYER DISTRIBUTION. Hire kids or adults to distribute ads, samples, coupons, announcements doortodoor or on parked car windows. Charge extra to record occupant reactions. Contract with individual businesses and advertising agencies. 40. FURNITURE RESALE. Select and buy promising articles of furniture cheap at garage sales, stores (tradeins) and furniture auctions. Clean up, do minor repairs and sell from your home. Concentrate on items that seem to do well in your area. 41 COPYREADY MASTERS. With your desktop publishing system and "laser jet" printer, convert customer's material into copy ready masters that can be reproduced locally. Especially good for small orders (setup costs are very expensive for these). 42. DOG HOUSES. Build standard (bargain priced) and custom (higher priced) dog houses in different sizes, shapes and colors. Include insulation, treated wood on bottom, insect repellant pillows or storage areas under the roof as options. 43. KITCHEN CABINET REFINISHING. Refinish inhome kitchen cabinets. Remove old finish; sand, fill dents with colored putty, stain (or paint), replace worn hardware, apply new finish and install new external door knobs and drawer pulls. 44. WORD PROCESSING. Produce interim drafts and finished professional letters, manuscripts and documents for students, lawyers, writers and businesses. Make provisions for client editing and subsequent rewriting as a part of your service. 45. TREE SURGERY. With a little training and experience, anyone can trim, treat, fill and seal tree "wounds". Start with small jobs and gradually increase as you build confidence and buy more equipment. Take large contracts only when confident. 46. ROOF COATING. METAL. Renew rusty and/or leaky metal roofs with paint, rust killer, galvanizing, aluminized tar or insulating (foam) toppings. Charge by the square. Tip: use mobile home coating (aluminum or white) for a durable finish. 47. RENTAL PREPARATION. Prepare apartments for occupancy: paint, do minor repairs, cover scratches, remove stains, replace bulbs, mow lawn, fix faucets and drains. Work with individual owners, rental agencies and real estate companies. 48. SURPLUS SALES. Buy bargain priced items at auctions and sales. Store neatly in a secure area; advertise to find buyers who need (and will pay for) them. Open your warehouse one or two days a week or sell large items by appointment. 49. ROCKING CHAIRS. Make beautiful, durable rocking chairs. Offer a variety of woods, finishes, sizes and styles to fit every customer. Charge extra for carving, special styles or madetomeasure models. Offer specials on Mr. & Mrs. sets. 50. GAZEBOS. Build gazebos. Display a standard model at a good price that you can deliver or customer can assemble. Then offer larger sizes and various extras, such as shape, screens, shingle roofs, benches. Use only quality materials. 5l. GLASS ETCHING. Custom etch (with acid, engraving bit and/or sandblaster) glassware for individuals toorder and for wholesaling to retail stores. Offer monograms, town or company logo, family crests, art designs and local themes. 52. GOURD CULTURE. Grow and process a variety of interesting gourds. Make them into decorations, utensils, painted figures, birdhouses. Retail gourds and doityourself finishing kits. Retail seed packets with instructions for prize gourds. 53. GOVERNMENT AUCTIONS. Go to major state and federal auctions and bid on items for subsequent resale. List with auction authorities to receive notices of pending auctions. Learn and follow the rules to find the best bargains. 54. GRAPHOANALYSlS. After learning the art and getting a diploma, offer your services as a handwriting analyst to individuals, law enforcement agencies and attorneys. Start with local readings; work fairs for experience. 55. HANGING PLANTS. Specialize in hanging plants (flowers, ferns, vines) of all sizes and descriptions. Display for sale when in peak condition in attractive pots, with interesting holders and hangers. Advertise that you take in trades! 56. HOME HANDYMAN. Perform handyman services for those who can't or don't have the time. Advertise clearly what you do, keep your appointments and guarantee your work (to the extent of your hourly wages). Save customers expensive service calls. 57 HOTHOUSE FABRICATING. Build and sell small hothouses, some with temperature controlled venting. Offer electric heating systems for use in the cooler climates and be prepared to give advice on their use. Consider selling seedlings. 58. HOUSE CLEANING. Offer onetime or periodic house cleaning services. Perform the heavy tasks (shampoo rugs, clean stoves, wash windows, wax the floors, defrost). Have a checklist of jobs to be done and agree on price beforehand. 59. HOUSE PAINTING. Contract to paint houses and apartments or rooms by the job. Have assistance (high school kids?) on hand when needed. Increase your profit by supplying quality (only) paint and supplies and bidding on the entire job. 60. INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEOS. CASSETTES. Make recordings of yourself or others teaching and demonstrating their specialties. Start with simple operations (making a will; cleaning a VCR); graduate to more complex instructions as you learn. 61. INVENTION PROMOTION. Purchase three to six month option rights on interesting inventions for relatively low fee. Run test promotions and buy only the successful ones  those you can sell for a nice profit or successfully market yourself. 62. INVENTORIES. Specialize in taking inventories for area merchants (at their convenience  usually after hours). Work alone or have a qualified team on call. Check with an insurance company to obtain bonding for yourself and assistants. 63. JACK REPAIR. Repair hydraulic jacks (take a course if necessary) in your garage shop for individuals, garages, mechanics, retail stores. Buy, sell, take in trades and rebuild all kinds. Offer special prices to mechanics. 64. JEWELRY BOXES. Make fine jewelry boxes to sell to and through gift stores, catalog sales and individuals. Line with velvet, offer lacquered, inlaid, shell or seed covered versions. Have varied finished and storage arrangements. 65. KITCHENWARE RENEWAL. Specialize in the renewal of fine cutlery, pans and wood kitchen utensils. Refinish and reshape, install new handles, reline, make pieces to match missing parts of sets. Offer personalization service. 66. KITES. Build, sell and demonstrate all kinds of kites and accessories. Start a program to sell advertising space to sponsoring merchants during "meets" that you help stage (e.g. open, between schools, towns). Give away kites as prizes 67 LAPIDARY (GEM MAKING). Operate a rock shop in your garage. Cut, polish facet, shape and mount gems in commercial and amateur findings. Sell mounted, unmounted gems and jewelry. Tumble imperfections and leftovers to sell separately. 68 LAWN MAINTENANCE. Contract to mow lawns by the job or season. Charge extra to edge, rake, collect and remove clippings. Refer related jobs to cooperating businesses for a finder's fee or commission. Expand your service as you grow. 69. LIBRARY RESEARCH. Use your talent and the public library to provide research data, technical details and background information for clients who need their "homework" done. Charge by the hour, page or a flat fee for your time and effort. 70. LIGHTING SPECIALIST. Design, sell, service and install lighting systems for external residence and business buildings. Use inexpensive 12 volt systems among shrubs for security and beauty; colored spotlights for unusual effects. 71. LITTLE LEAGUE CARDS. Take pictures of small fry baseball (etc.) players and print on baseballlike cards, complete with their names, position and other "official" information. Offer in sets with extra copies for proud parents and relatives. 72. MAGAZINE. SUBSCRIPTIONS. Sell a variety of magazine subscriptions from your "office". Use "gimmicky" ads, give credit for leads and prizes for multiple sales. Do lots of telephone canvassing. Have a special every time you call. 73. MAILING LISTS. Compile mailing lists from various local and wider area sources (buy voting registration lists, check on buying tax and license lists). Sell names to brokers or keep current and rent them yourself (on self stick labels). 74. MARBLE CASTING. With "synthetic marble", cast, finish and market figurines, ashtrays, office (pen bases) and commercial (trophies) items for wholesale accounts (stationery stores, etc.). Make one or two special items for local retail. 75. METAL FOUNDRY. Operate a small metal foundry in your garage workshop. Cast parts as a subcontractor, custom items or your own products. Buy or pickup scrap metal to melt down. Examples: dresser knobs, door plates and trophy bases. 76. METAL RECYCLING. Pick up, sort, process (dismantle, clean wires) waste metals from any source. Accumulate into lots, wait for periods of high prices and haul to salvage yards. Advertise to buy surplus metals (at lower rates of course). 77. MINIATURE GARDENS. Create various sizes of gardenlike display containers of live plants for hospital sick rooms, boxes for balconies, rooftop planters, offices and residences. Include instructions for care to make your products last. 78. MOSAIC TILE. Buy patterns or create custom designed pieces and install in an exclusive design for each customer. Offer exquisite kitchen and bathroom designs, as well as spa and even swimming pool arrangements. Charge for tile too. 79. MOSQUITO PATROL. With a sprayer mounted on your vehicle, contract to drive through neighborhoods on an established route and spray for mosquitoes (normally with a light malathion mixture in diesel). Work with city or county authorities. 80. MOVIE MAKING (SHORTS). With your 16MM or VCR camera and related equipment, make custom instructional, informative (company introductions), promotional and advertising clips. Use for board meetings, briefings and for cable advertising. 81. MOVING ASSISTANCE. With your truck HELP clients move (versus "move" them  to stay legal). You can help them pack load, move, unload unpack. Have standby crew ready to assist. Charge for your time and expenses, not the move. 82. NATURE'S PRODUCTS. When in an area with wild products (hickory nuts, maple syrup) that you can harvest, do so! Process, package and sell then as genuine products of nature. Clear your operation with the local health department first. 83. WINDOWS AND SCREENS. Repair windows: replace glass, repair frames, renew or rebuild screens. List with hardware stores and keep an ad in the paper. Fix one broken pane or bid to renew windows and/or replace all screens on the house. 84. NECKTlES. Make exclusive, hand made ties from exotic materials from all over the world. Offer a selection of designs, attach your exclusive label and advertise in men's magazines. Try local stores first then try larger markets. 85. NEEDLECRAFT. Make your own style of homemade items (pot holders, bonnets, towel rings) to sell on consignment, to catalog companies, or at a booth at fairs or flea markets. Present them in tasteful fashion with your label attached. 86. NElGHBORHOOD NEWS. Compile, publish and distribute a neighborhood newspaper (or newsletter) with local news, opinions and interesting features. Include lots of names; sell space for opinions, announcements and advertisements. 87. ONCALL CLERK. Register with several stores to be called for temporary or emergency fillin (for the store or an individual), for clerical or sales situations. Should pay more than normal wages and could lead to a permanent job. 88. PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT. Build and install (and maintain) playground equipment: forts, slides, climbing/monkey bars, sandboxes, swings, teeters, circle rides. Use commercial patterns or design your own. Check on liability insurance. 89. PET PHOTOGRAPHY. Specialize in pet portraits: in their home, your studio or in their own "natural" setting. Offer a package price for so many of each size. Go to dog shows and take pictures of willing subjects (the losers too!). 90. PICNIC TABLES. Build standard, custom and deluxe model picnic tables Offer a variety of sizes, styles, finishes and colors. Expand to folding model and sets with umbrellas. Offer matching chairs, end tables and child sized pieces. 91. PICTURE FRAMING. Make unique picture frames for stores, artists and clients from moldings, scraps, unusual fabrics. Set up jigs for the standard sizes. Between orders make standard sized frames that can be finished in a variety of ways. 92. PIES AND COOKIES. Take orders for or contract for your specialty baked goods. Deliver to wholesale customers in containers that appear to be full and have your name and logo imprinted on the cartons. Give retail customers pickup time. 93. PILLOWS. Make and decorate designer, fancy, or "down home" pillows. Sell to boutiques, fairs, through party plans, sales catalogs and advertisements. Offer a variety of sizes, shapes and covers. Do custom work for client's decor. 94. PLANT SCULPTURE. A profitable specialty: braid trunks, shape into interesting forms. Trim, bend, graft, to create valuable sculptures that bring premium prices. Use pictures in your ads; sell each plant as an individual creation. 95. PRODUCT REPACKAGING. Buy bulk products (nails, beans, vinegar) by the ton or barrel. Repackage into neatly labeled packets, pints or boxes a sell for much more. Check with a local attorney on any restrictive laws in your community. 96. PRODUCT PHOTOGRAPHY. Take flattering, descriptive pictures of merchandise, clothing and satisfied customers for advertisements, catalogs and brochures. Send sample brochures to prospective manufacturers, distributors and retailers. 97. PRODUCT REPACKAGING. Buy bulk products (nails, paint thinner, beans, vinegar) by the ton or barrel. Purchase and repackage into neat (and full) packets, pints, boxes. Consider using your own label (with legal advice) on containers. 98. PROOFREADING. Review manuscripts and printed copy and advertisements for accuracy and grammar. Get considerably more to review for content quality and technical accuracy. Work with editors, writers, publishers and educators. 99. PROPERTY PORTFOLIOS. Prepare photograph and property description folders. Make up folios for private parties (to make sure their property is shown in the best possible light), and for real estate companies to use in sales presentations. 100. REUPHOLSTERY SERVICE. Recover overstuffed chairs and sofas for clients in your shop (sell fabrics). Buy good furniture that needs recovering cheap at auctions to reupholster and resell at a nice profit. Take tradeins to redo. 101. YARD CLEANUP. Contract with homeowners, realtors and rental agents to clean up yards after winter, evictions, storms. Mow, remove debris, water, replant, fertilize. Use periodic ads in the paper, especially after winter or stormy weather. 102 TOY MANUFACTURING. Create, manufacture and market unique toys that you can make in your shop possibly made in part by a "partner" seamstress. Market to local stores, catalog sales houses or by mail. Go to and have your own booth at fairs. 103. WRITE FOR CHILDREN. Write poems, Sunday school stories, puzzle explanations, riddles, etc. for children. Sell to local papers, children's book publishers or in your own booklets. Check Writer's Guide in Library for more information! 104. GAG WRITING. Specialize in one liners and short funny situations. Sketch your ideas, list each on a separate card and file by subject matter. Offer your collection to cartoonists or comics. Get their addresses from Writer's Guide in the library. 105  SCHOOL DESK SALES. Buy old school desks at sales and closed rural schools. Refurbish and decorate into nostalgic furniture, plant stands and children's furniture. Sell restored items individually, wholesale to stores or finish to order. 106  PROMOTIONS. Organize community and commercial promotions: order bumper stickers, posters; arrange for news releases, interviews, photo sessions. Plan agenda, schedule workers, coordinate events for a fee or percentage of profits. 107  PEN PAL SERVICE. Advertise in both home and overseas publications for correspondees. Charge for addresses or for a subscription to your club news with paid advertisements placed by those seeking penpals. Sell names to mailing list brokers. 99 BUSINESSES FOR NEW AMERICANS A collection of businesses especially selected for newly arrived people or immigrants who want to increase their income and build security in their adopted country. These are businesses that can be started with minimal training and investment and do not require a high level of English language skills. They are almost certain to produce extra income. Most can be operated by one person or family. These businesses can usually be sold for extra profit when the operators are ready to move on. This listing is most valuable when used in conjunction with your imagination. Only you can possibly know your special desires, your capabilities and your particular situation. For this reason, you are encouraged to substitute products and services listed here that may be more suitable for your environment. Read over a few ideas at a time and make notes of those that interest you. Include any additional ideas that pop into your mind  these can be valuable! Review your completed list from time to time and eliminate those that sound less promising. Keep narrowing your list to things that you think have a good potential. Meanwhile, consider your surroundings. What products or services can you supply that are needed and that people will pay for? When you find just the right combination for your personality, finances, talents and the needs of your area, start preparing for your successful business! 99 BUSINESSES FOR NEW AMERICANS 01  ADULT DAY CARE left. Operate a left to look after elderly and/or handicapped people. Offer refreshments, games, activities and assistance, but not health care. 02  AUTO TOUCHUP. Repair minor dents, cover rock chips, remove rust, polish, clean tires. Renew rubber and plastic, deodorize to help bring the best price or tradein. 03  BOTANICA. Stock "magic" potions, roots, powders, candles, good luck charms. Print (buy) and sell related instructions and lore. Careful not to guarantee cures or results! 04  COSTUME RENTAL. Make (buy, sell) and alter costumes for parties, halloween, promotions, school plays. Expand to formal clothing rentals (tuxedos, gowns). 05  DANCING SCHOOL. Instruct others in your dance specialty in group or individual classes. Be sure to "showcase" students to encourage them and publicize your business! 06  JACK REPAIR. Repair hydraulic jacks in your garage shop for individuals, garages, mechanics and retail stores. Buy, sell, take in trades and rebuild all kinds. 07  PAPIER MACHE SCULPTURE. Create a selection of your "standard" caricatures, pinatas and offer custom versions. Assemble doityourself kits with full instructions. 08  SALAD SERVICE. Make and deliver, fresh daily salad packets to small stores, lunch counters and cafes. When ready, submit bids to larger serving operations. 09  MAIL ORDER SALES. Find the right product, "showcase" it, advertise it, and sell it by mail (ads and/or mailing lists). Caution: heavy competition and many "sharks"! 10  WINDOWS AND SCREENS. Repair windows (replace glass, repair frames). Renew or rebuild screens. Offer different screens, and package prices for all new screens. 11 ACCUMULATION SALE. Gather items from job lot purchases or any source. Clean up and store until you have enough to hold a sale from your home. Then arrange and sell. 12  AWNINGS, WINDOW. Design, sell and install permanent and foldup fabric and or metal awnings for storefronts, patios, house windows, trailers and mobile homes. 13  BUILDER'S CLEANUP. Work with contractors to clean up during and after construction jobs. Sweep out building, haul away all debris. Salvage leftovers as bonus. 14  COUNTER REFINISHING. Refinish, repair damaged counter tops in homes, businesses and for rental or housing agents. Advertise and list your service with hardware stores. 15  FURNITURE MAKING. Start with one or two popular items that you can "mass" produce easily and sell well such as bunk beds or patio chairs. Gradually add other products. 16  INSULATION SERVICE. Start a service to install roll, foam or bat insulation, or use your truck or trailer mounted blower to install blownin attic and wall insulation. 17  MARBLE CASTING. With "synthetic" marble, cast, finish and market figurines, ashtrays, office (pen bases), home (door plates), commercial (trophies) items to order. 18  PILLOWS. Make and decorate designer, fancy, or "down home" pillows to sell in boutiques, fairs, party plans, sales catalogs and/or advertisements and mail order. 19  SECURITY PATROL. Contract with neighborhood residents to provide security patrols (car, foot) in areas needing additional protection. Notify and work with local police. 20  WALKWAYS. Specialize in walkways and sidewalks of brick, stone, wood or cement. Bid on complete jobs, including materials. Expand to ramps for the handicapped. 21  LIMOUSINE SERVICE. Provide a chauffeured limo for special occasions and prestigious business situations. Take kids to prom, newlyweds to their hotel, meet visiting VIP's. 22  OIL RECLAIMING. With a mechanical filtering system, collect used oil from service stations and mechanics. Purify (strain), bottle and market as reconstituted oil. 23  COOP STORE. Form a coop business to display and sell member products (crafts, produce, merchandise). Members share expenses, ownership, work and profits. 24  BEAUTY AIDS. Sell general or specialized beauty (or ethnic) supplies in your home salon or by appointment. Represent established lines and/or sell your own brand. 25  APPLIANCE LEASING. Buy (new or used) and lease appliances to individuals, landlords, rental agents and commercial operations. Service your own equipment while leased. 26  BOOKKEEPING SERVICE. Provide (even beginning) bookkeeping services to (especially oneperson) small businesses in your area. Expand to complex systems and computer. 27  CREDIT CLINIC. Advise and assist people who have gotten into debt. Contact creditors to set up a repayment schedule. Show clients how to avoid future problems. 28  HOUSE CLEANING. Offer onetime or periodic house cleaning services. Perform the heavy tasks (shampoo rugs, clean stoves, wash windows, wax the floors, defrost, etc.) 29  ROOFING. Repair, replace or rebuild roofs on homes and commercial buildings. Buy materials wholesale and charge retail. Subcontract some jobs for a commission. 30  TREE TRIMMING. Trim and shape trees and shrubs for private and commercial clients. Be sure to learn proper trimming, pruning and sealing (against pests) methods. 31  LUNCH WAGON. Drive your lunch wagon to business/construction/public sites to sell hot food, snacks, drinks. Work with management for parking and customer dining space. 32  FURNITURE RESALE. Select promising articles of furniture cheap at garage sales and auctions. Clean up, do minor repairs and sell from your home for a nice profit. 33  COOLING SERVICE. Prepare complete meals at home, from your traditional or customized (gourmet, ethnic, traditional) menu to be delivered and served hot, or picked up. 34  BONSAI PLANTS. Grow (or buy) and arrange into attractive pots or arrangements. Retail from your home, shop or wholesale to flower shops, greenhouses and nurseries. 35  COLLECTION SELLING. Collect prints, recipes, hobby objects, relics, etc. to buy and sell by mail. Accumulate a supply. Learn subject well enough to trade and advise. 36  GARAGE CLEANING Contract to clean out garages, sheds and attics for individuals, rental agents and absentee landlords. Get paid for the work AND keep things of value. 37  ICE CREAM ROUTE. With portable refrigerator, sell ice cream on a daily neighborhood route. Include cold (hot in winter) drinks and other snack foods for variety. 38  METER REBUILDING. Buy surplus water and electrical meters from utility companies. Use special equipment to test and rebuild them for resale to RV parks, apartments. 39  RENTAL PREPARATION. Prepare apartments for occupancy: paint, do minor repairs, cover scratches, remove stains, replace bulbs, mow lawn, check faucets and drains. 40  TRANSLATION SERVICE, If bilingual, offer your services for verbal translations or do paper (letters, advertisements, instructions) translations in your "home office." 41  GARDEN PREPARATION. Dig (Rototill), treat, fertilize gardens for customers. Plant, cultivate, weed, maintain (water, spray), even harvest for extra charges. 42  COMPOSTING SERVICE. With your portable composting machine, go to client locations and reduce their brush and trimmings to compost. Charge to clear AND to compost. 43  CATERING SERVICE. Prepare old fashioned, gourmet or special occasion meals for clients to pick up. Use insulated canisters to keep the food hot (charge deposit). 44  BLACKSMITHING. Operate a small blacksmith shop in your garage or shop. Do repair and custom work. Make things to sell (weather vanes, railings) between orders. 45  AUTO PARTS REBUILDING. Work with garages and mechanics. Specialize in rebuilding one or more parts (carburetors, master cylinders) for one or several makes. 46  CHAUFFEUR SERVICE. Use your "1imo" (van, station wagon) to pick up people at airports, shopping tours, to/from games, parties (check insurance, license needs). 47  DAY LABOR AGENCY. Specialize in providing mostly unskilled workers for shortterm jobs. Keep list of workers. Be able to deliver them when, where they are needed. 48  HERBAL AND SPICE TEA. Blend and sell different blends of herbal teas. Include leaflets with history and folklore in each package. Use uniquely decorated containers. 49  JOB HUNTER COACH. Provide brushup or shortterm specialized training for job hunters (new equipment, latest programs, skill enhancement) as long school alternative. 50  NAIL POLISH MANUFACTURING. Buy red lacquer in bulk and bottles in bulk. Mix in various colors, bottle and sell. Add your own nail polish remover (acetone mixture). 51  TILE WORK. Specialize in ceramic tile: install in bathrooms, sinks, floors. Work by the hour or better still, submit bids for jobs, including the tile (at retail price). 52  QUILTING. Make and sell beautiful homemade quilts from "scraps" in your "spare time." Take color photographs of each quilt and make a "catalog" to show them. 53  PLANT SCULPTURE. A profitable specialty: braid trunks, shape into interesting forms. Trim, bend, graft, to create valuable sculptures that bring premium prices. 54  LAPIDARY (GEM MAKING). Operate a "rock shop" in your garage. Cut, polish facet, shape and mount gems in findings. Sell mounted, unmounted gems and jewelry. 55  HOME HANDYMAN. Perform handyman services for those who can't or don't have the time. Make good money and save customers the cost of an expensive technician. 56  FLOWER DRYING. Raise or buy dryable flowers and shrubs for retail and wholesale customers: one kind packets or arrangements. Sell kits with complete instructions. 57  DUMP TRUCK. With your own truck, take orders from your "home office" to deliver loads of fill, topsoil, sand, gravel etc. to homeowners, landscapers and contractors. 58  BREAD SPECIALTIES. Bake and sell unusual varieties of home made breads: low calorie, ethnic, etc. Take orders for loaves fresh from your kitchen, deliver to stores. 59  ADULT MERCHANDISE. Specialize in sale of adult literature and merchandise. Sell from your own stock or have materials dropshipped directly from your suppliers. 60  CEMETERY CARE. Contract with cemetery associations, authorities (or families for small plots) to provide care for grounds, or specific services for individual graves. 61  DELIVERY SERVICE. Contract with local markets, drug stores and pizza parlors to deliver to their customers on a retainer basis. Call in for orders or use car phone. 62  GOVERNMENT AUCTIONS. Go to major auctions and bid on items for subsequent resale. Take the time to learn and follow the rules to avail yourself of excellent bargains. 63  IRON CHAIRS. Locate and restore old iron chairs and tables. Remove rust, reweld as necessary, sand and apply quality primer and rustproof paint. Sell and guarantee. 64  LAWN MAINTENANCE. Contract to mow lawns by the job or season. Charge extra to edge, rake (or blow), collect and remove clippings. Refer related jobs for a commission. 65  CEMENT JOBS, SMALL,. Contract small jobs with your mixer, equipment and truck. Haul your own materials. Do small profitable jobs big companies can't afford to bid on. 66  MOVING ASSISTANCE. With your truck, HELP clients move (vice "move" them  to stay legal). Have standby crew ready to assist. Charge for your time and "expenses." 67  PICTURE FRAMING. Make unique picture frames for stores, artists and clients from driftwood, scraps and unusual fabrics. Set up jigs in your shop for standard sizes. 68 TAlCHAN or OIGONG CLASSES. Specialize in leading and teaching Asian aerobic exercises. They should be especially attractive to office workers and the elderly. 69  AIR DUCT CLEANING. Contract with restaurants (mostly) to perform this necessary service on a onetime basis, or to clean and maintain them on a scheduled basis. 70  BAIL BONDING. Establish a bail bonding service in your community AFTER checking on state and local laws. Place your phone number and name on a BIG sign near the jail! 71  CARPET REPAIR. Repair burns, tears, bad and worn spots in carpets for individuals, rental agencies, businesses, hotels. Good sideline for carpet cleaners, dyers, installers. 72  TREE FARMING. Start from seed or obtain seedlings (liners) from large growers. Plant, provide minimal care and wait for market size growth, then dig up and sell. 73  FIREWOOD. Contract to clear land with trees. Compost the brush, cut and store the logs for firewood. Cut to standard lengths, stack by size and type for winter sales. 74  JANITORIAL SERVICE. Contract to clean business and institutions on regular basis. Find out exact requirements and submit your bid on each contract. Bond all employees. 75  METAL CASTING. Operate a metal foundry in your garage workshop. Cast parts to order and/or make things to sell. Buy or pick up scrap metal to melt down or resell. 76  SURPLUS SALES. With a secure storage area, buy bargain priced items at auctions and sales. Store and advertise for buyers who want them and will pay you a good markup. 77  APPLIANCE REPAIR. Repair household and light commercial appliances in your shop or on service calls. Sell parts and replacements, take in trades; fix and resell them. 78  FLEAMARKET BOOTH. Buy one or more categories of merchandise from closeout suppliers and operate a flea market booth. Keep stock in a van and drive to and from. 79  JICAMA FARMING. Grow and market the delicious (and expensive) water chestnutlike jicama (heck'ema), a sweet potato related climbing vine that likes long, hot summers. 80  PRIVATE USED CAR LOT. Rent space to private owners to display their "for sale" cars, etc., on your car lot. Put up a sign, take calls, sell placards to sellers. 81  TAMALES AND TACOS. Take orders for tamales, tacos (or other specialties) in your kitchen for customer or pickup (or delivery to restaurants). Freeze leftovers. 82  POOL TABLE REPAIR. Recover and refurbish pool tables for businesses and private parties, sell materials, buy and sell used tables. Sell and/or repair accessories. 83  JEWELRY BOXES. Make fine jewelry boxes (lined, lacquered, inlaid, shell covered) for gift stores, catalog sales and retail sales. Add music works for extra profits. 84  HOUSE PAINTING. Contract to paint houses and apartments by the hour or job. Pay high school or college kids a percentage or hourly fee to help, provide the paint. 85  FLOOR REFINISHING. Sand, bleach, repair and refinish wood floors. Refurbish linoleum with your own or rented equipment, install new linoleum and baseboards. 86  CUT FLOWER BUSINESS. Grow and supply freshly cut flowers to markets and florists. Offer seasonal or specialize in one or two greenhouse/shade house varieties. 87  BARBQUE. Set up a portable meat smoker to take to fairs, parades and festivals. Have a supply of meat ready, but keep AROMA going to attract more business. 88  AUTO THEFT PROTECTION. Offer a variety of devices, systems and price ranges that you can install and maintain to prevent your customers' cars from being stolen. 89  CONCRETE MOLDING Cast cement statues, birdbaths, waterfalls and lawn ornaments. Offer texture & color variations, custom finishing, water and lighting kits. 90  CROSSWORDS, FOREIGN LANGUAGE. Design and market crossword puzzles: words in one language, definitions in another. Sell to language schools and by mail order. 91  RECIPE SALES. Perfect your favorite recipes. Promote and sell them individually, in small sets, or collections. Sell something that will make the cook look great! 92  SNOW CONE STAND. Sell shaved ice cones from your stand or van: as many flavors as possible. Include other products to increase sales: hot coffee on a cold day. 93  PRODUCT REPACKAGING. Buy bulk products (nails, beans, vinegar) by the ton or barrel. Repackage into neatly labeled packets, pints, boxes and sell for much more. 94  MUSIC, LIVE. Arrange for live music for weddings, parties, festivals, banquets, even club dates. Have several types of groups, styles and price ranges on call. 95  DEHYDRATING BUSINESS. Build your own (solar?) drier to dry inseason fruits and vegetables. When cured, package for retail and/or wholesale customers. 96  CUSTOM CLOTHING DESIGNS. Paint, block print or transfer unique designs on clothing for smocks, aprons or fabrics to be used for clothing, curtains or upholstery. 97  CUSTODIAL SERVICE. Contract to maintain office buildings and warehouses: change light bulbs, fix windows, oil fans, fill cracks, fix leaks, replace locks, replace tile, etc. 98  CONSIGNMENT SALES. With a display area, accept and tastefully display interesting items (only) to sell on consignment. Have forms for written sales agreements. 99  SELFMADE OPPORTUNITIES. Find a "deal" on a piece of new or used equipment (watch the paper; go to sales). Learn to operate it properly and start your business! AND, A FEW EXTRAS... 100  CEILING RENEWAL. Clean (renew) walls and acoustic ceilings in homes, offices, condos, stores. Save customers the price of new paint or ceiling. List with hardware stores. 101  CONCESSION BOOTH. Operate a booth or stand at a recreation area, shopping mall or parking lot. Sell your products plus others that will help attract more customers. 102  CEMENT BLOCKS. Mold small orders of standard or custom blocks (building, stepping stones, curbs) in all colors. Take orders, sell from your "yard" and through nurseries. 103  BEAN SPROUTS. Grow fresh bean sprouts on a rotating basis: have new crop every week or as needed to supply restaurants, vegetable markets and retail customers. 104  AUTO UPHOLSTERING. Install auto and truck headliners, side paneling and seat covers from your garage or workshop. Offer a choice of material and color combinations. 105  MIDNIGHT SNACKS. Prepare and deliver hot coffee, sandwiches and other snacks to night shift workers, night owls and late parties. Advertise on all night radio. 106  BATIK CREATION. Learn this ancient process: dip fabric in wax, crinkle, scratch or melt design into the wax, then dip into dye. Clean, stretch, dry into a valuable decoration. 107  BALLOON STAND. Set up your booth or table with an air tank (helium) and supply of balloons and accessories. Sell at parades, fairs, flea markets, wherever kids are! 108  JEWELRY CREATIONS. Use your talent and ingenuity to mass produce or individually create exquisite jewelry  from virtually anything from diamonds to sliced bamboo. 99 BUSINESSES FOR NEW AMERICANS A collection of businesses especially selected for newly arrived people or immigrants who want to increase their income and build security in their adopted country. These are businesses that can be started with minimal training and investment and do not require a high level of English language skills. They are almost certain to produce extra income. Most can be operated by one person or family. These businesses can usually be sold for extra profit when the operators are ready to move on. This listing is most valuable when used in conjunction with your imagination. Only you can possibly know your special desires, your capabilities and your particular situation. For this reason, you are encouraged to substitute products and services listed here that may be more suitable for your environment. Read over a few ideas at a time and make notes of those that interest you. Include any additional ideas that pop into your mind  these can be valuable! Review your completed list from time to time and eliminate those that sound less promising. Keep narrowing your list to things that you think have a good potential. Meanwhile, consider your surroundings. What products or services can you supply that are needed and that people will pay for? When you find just the right combination for your personality, finances, talents and the needs of your area, start preparing for your successful business! 99 BUSINESSES FOR NEW AMERICANS 01  ADULT DAY CARE left. Operate a left to look after elderly and/or handicapped people. Offer refreshments, games, activities and assistance, but not health care. 02  AUTO TOUCHUP. Repair minor dents, cover rock chips, remove rust, polish, clean tires. Renew rubber and plastic, deodorize to help bring the best price or tradein. 03  BOTANICA. Stock "magic" potions, roots, powders, candles, good luck charms. Print (buy) and sell related instructions and lore. Careful not to guarantee cures or results! 04  COSTUME RENTAL. Make (buy, sell) and alter costumes for parties, halloween, promotions, school plays. Expand to formal clothing rentals (tuxedos, gowns). 05  DANCING SCHOOL. Instruct others in your dance specialty in group or individual classes. Be sure to "showcase" students to encourage them and publicize your business! 06  JACK REPAIR. Repair hydraulic jacks in your garage shop for individuals, garages, mechanics and retail stores. Buy, sell, take in trades and rebuild all kinds. 07  PAPIER MACHE SCULPTURE. Create a selection of your "standard" caricatures, pinatas and offer custom versions. Assemble doityourself kits with full instructions. 08  SALAD SERVICE. Make and deliver, fresh daily salad packets to small stores, lunch counters and cafes. When ready, submit bids to larger serving operations. 09  MAIL ORDER SALES. Find the right product, "showcase" it, advertise it, and sell it by mail (ads and/or mailing lists). Caution: heavy competition and many "sharks"! 10  WINDOWS AND SCREENS. Repair windows (replace glass, repair frames). Renew or rebuild screens. Offer different screens, and package prices for all new screens. 11 ACCUMULATION SALE. Gather items from job lot purchases or any source. Clean up and store until you have enough to hold a sale from your home. Then arrange and sell. 12  AWNINGS, WINDOW. Design, sell and install permanent and foldup fabric and or metal awnings for storefronts, patios, house windows, trailers and mobile homes. 13  BUILDER'S CLEANUP. Work with contractors to clean up during and after construction jobs. Sweep out building, haul away all debris. Salvage leftovers as bonus. 14  COUNTER REFINISHING. Refinish, repair damaged counter tops in homes, businesses and for rental or housing agents. Advertise and list your service with hardware stores. 15  FURNITURE MAKING. Start with one or two popular items that you can "mass" produce easily and sell well such as bunk beds or patio chairs. Gradually add other products. 16  INSULATION SERVICE. Start a service to install roll, foam or bat insulation, or use your truck or trailer mounted blower to install blownin attic and wall insulation. 17  MARBLE CASTING. With "synthetic" marble, cast, finish and market figurines, ashtrays, office (pen bases), home (door plates), commercial (trophies) items to order. 18  PILLOWS. Make and decorate designer, fancy, or "down home" pillows to sell in boutiques, fairs, party plans, sales catalogs and/or advertisements and mail order. 19  SECURITY PATROL. Contract with neighborhood residents to provide security patrols (car, foot) in areas needing additional protection. Notify and work with local police. 20  WALKWAYS. Specialize in walkways and sidewalks of brick, stone, wood or cement. Bid on complete jobs, including materials. Expand to ramps for the handicapped. 21  LIMOUSINE SERVICE. Provide a chauffeured limo for special occasions and prestigious business situations. Take kids to prom, newlyweds to their hotel, meet visiting VIP's. 22  OIL RECLAIMING. With a mechanical filtering system, collect used oil from service stations and mechanics. Purify (strain), bottle and market as reconstituted oil. 23  COOP STORE. Form a coop business to display and sell member products (crafts, produce, merchandise). Members share expenses, ownership, work and profits. 24  BEAUTY AIDS. Sell general or specialized beauty (or ethnic) supplies in your home salon or by appointment. Represent established lines and/or sell your own brand. 25  APPLIANCE LEASING. Buy (new or used) and lease appliances to individuals, landlords, rental agents and commercial operations. Service your own equipment while leased. 26  BOOKKEEPING SERVICE. Provide (even beginning) bookkeeping services to (especially oneperson) small businesses in your area. Expand to complex systems and computer. 27  CREDIT CLINIC. Advise and assist people who have gotten into debt. Contact creditors to set up a repayment schedule. Show clients how to avoid future problems. 28  HOUSE CLEANING. Offer onetime or periodic house cleaning services. Perform the heavy tasks (shampoo rugs, clean stoves, wash windows, wax the floors, defrost, etc.) 29  ROOFING. Repair, replace or rebuild roofs on homes and commercial buildings. Buy materials wholesale and charge retail. Subcontract some jobs for a commission. 30  TREE TRIMMING. Trim and shape trees and shrubs for private and commercial clients. Be sure to learn proper trimming, pruning and sealing (against pests) methods. 31  LUNCH WAGON. Drive your lunch wagon to business/construction/public sites to sell hot food, snacks, drinks. Work with management for parking and customer dining space. 32  FURNITURE RESALE. Select promising articles of furniture cheap at garage sales and auctions. Clean up, do minor repairs and sell from your home for a nice profit. 33  COOLING SERVICE. Prepare complete meals at home, from your traditional or customized (gourmet, ethnic, traditional) menu to be delivered and served hot, or picked up. 34  BONSAI PLANTS. Grow (or buy) and arrange into attractive pots or arrangements. Retail from your home, shop or wholesale to flower shops, greenhouses and nurseries. 35  COLLECTION SELLING. Collect prints, recipes, hobby objects, relics, etc. to buy and sell by mail. Accumulate a supply. Learn subject well enough to trade and advise. 36  GARAGE CLEANING Contract to clean out garages, sheds and attics for individuals, rental agents and absentee landlords. Get paid for the work AND keep things of value. 37  ICE CREAM ROUTE. With portable refrigerator, sell ice cream on a daily neighborhood route. Include cold (hot in winter) drinks and other snack foods for variety. 38  METER REBUILDING. Buy surplus water and electrical meters from utility companies. Use special equipment to test and rebuild them for resale to RV parks, apartments. 39  RENTAL PREPARATION. Prepare apartments for occupancy: paint, do minor repairs, cover scratches, remove stains, replace bulbs, mow lawn, check faucets and drains. 40  TRANSLATION SERVICE, If bilingual, offer your services for verbal translations or do paper (letters, advertisements, instructions) translations in your "home office." 41  GARDEN PREPARATION. Dig (Rototill), treat, fertilize gardens for customers. Plant, cultivate, weed, maintain (water, spray), even harvest for extra charges. 42  COMPOSTING SERVICE. With your portable composting machine, go to client locations and reduce their brush and trimmings to compost. Charge to clear AND to compost. 43  CATERING SERVICE. Prepare old fashioned, gourmet or special occasion meals for clients to pick up. Use insulated canisters to keep the food hot (charge deposit). 44  BLACKSMITHING. Operate a small blacksmith shop in your garage or shop. Do repair and custom work. Make things to sell (weather vanes, railings) between orders. 45  AUTO PARTS REBUILDING. Work with garages and mechanics. Specialize in rebuilding one or more parts (carburetors, master cylinders) for one or several makes. 46  CHAUFFEUR SERVICE. Use your "1imo" (van, station wagon) to pick up people at airports, shopping tours, to/from games, parties (check insurance, license needs). 47  DAY LABOR AGENCY. Specialize in providing mostly unskilled workers for shortterm jobs. Keep list of workers. Be able to deliver them when, where they are needed. 48  HERBAL AND SPICE TEA. Blend and sell different blends of herbal teas. Include leaflets with history and folklore in each package. Use uniquely decorated containers. 49  JOB HUNTER COACH. Provide brushup or shortterm specialized training for job hunters (new equipment, latest programs, skill enhancement) as long school alternative. 50  NAIL POLISH MANUFACTURING. Buy red lacquer in bulk and bottles in bulk. Mix in various colors, bottle and sell. Add your own nail polish remover (acetone mixture). 51  TILE WORK. Specialize in ceramic tile: install in bathrooms, sinks, floors. Work by the hour or better still, submit bids for jobs, including the tile (at retail price). 52  QUILTING. Make and sell beautiful homemade quilts from "scraps" in your "spare time." Take color photographs of each quilt and make a "catalog" to show them. 53  PLANT SCULPTURE. A profitable specialty: braid trunks, shape into interesting forms. Trim, bend, graft, to create valuable sculptures that bring premium prices. 54  LAPIDARY (GEM MAKING). Operate a "rock shop" in your garage. Cut, polish facet, shape and mount gems in findings. Sell mounted, unmounted gems and jewelry. 55  HOME HANDYMAN. Perform handyman services for those who can't or don't have the time. Make good money and save customers the cost of an expensive technician. 56  FLOWER DRYING. Raise or buy dryable flowers and shrubs for retail and wholesale customers: one kind packets or arrangements. Sell kits with complete instructions. 57  DUMP TRUCK. With your own truck, take orders from your "home office" to deliver loads of fill, topsoil, sand, gravel etc. to homeowners, landscapers and contractors. 58  BREAD SPECIALTIES. Bake and sell unusual varieties of home made breads: low calorie, ethnic, etc. Take orders for loaves fresh from your kitchen, deliver to stores. 59  ADULT MERCHANDISE. Specialize in sale of adult literature and merchandise. Sell from your own stock or have materials dropshipped directly from your suppliers. 60  CEMETERY CARE. Contract with cemetery associations, authorities (or families for small plots) to provide care for grounds, or specific services for individual graves. 61  DELIVERY SERVICE. Contract with local markets, drug stores and pizza parlors to deliver to their customers on a retainer basis. Call in for orders or use car phone. 62  GOVERNMENT AUCTIONS. Go to major auctions and bid on items for subsequent resale. Take the time to learn and follow the rules to avail yourself of excellent bargains. 63  IRON CHAIRS. Locate and restore old iron chairs and tables. Remove rust, reweld as necessary, sand and apply quality primer and rustproof paint. Sell and guarantee. 64  LAWN MAINTENANCE. Contract to mow lawns by the job or season. Charge extra to edge, rake (or blow), collect and remove clippings. Refer related jobs for a commission. 65  CEMENT JOBS, SMALL,. Contract small jobs with your mixer, equipment and truck. Haul your own materials. Do small profitable jobs big companies can't afford to bid on. 66  MOVING ASSISTANCE. With your truck, HELP clients move (vice "move" them  to stay legal). Have standby crew ready to assist. Charge for your time and "expenses." 67  PICTURE FRAMING. Make unique picture frames for stores, artists and clients from driftwood, scraps and unusual fabrics. Set up jigs in your shop for standard sizes. 68 TAlCHAN or OIGONG CLASSES. Specialize in leading and teaching Asian aerobic exercises. They should be especially attractive to office workers and the elderly. 69  AIR DUCT CLEANING. Contract with restaurants (mostly) to perform this necessary service on a onetime basis, or to clean and maintain them on a scheduled basis. 70  BAIL BONDING. Establish a bail bonding service in your community AFTER checking on state and local laws. Place your phone number and name on a BIG sign near the jail! 71  CARPET REPAIR. Repair burns, tears, bad and worn spots in carpets for individuals, rental agencies, businesses, hotels. Good sideline for carpet cleaners, dyers, installers. 72  TREE FARMING. Start from seed or obtain seedlings (liners) from large growers. Plant, provide minimal care and wait for market size growth, then dig up and sell. 73  FIREWOOD. Contract to clear land with trees. Compost the brush, cut and store the logs for firewood. Cut to standard lengths, stack by size and type for winter sales. 74  JANITORIAL SERVICE. Contract to clean business and institutions on regular basis. Find out exact requirements and submit your bid on each contract. Bond all employees. 75  METAL CASTING. Operate a metal foundry in your garage workshop. Cast parts to order and/or make things to sell. Buy or pick up scrap metal to melt down or resell. 76  SURPLUS SALES. With a secure storage area, buy bargain priced items at auctions and sales. Store and advertise for buyers who want them and will pay you a good markup. 77  APPLIANCE REPAIR. Repair household and light commercial appliances in your shop or on service calls. Sell parts and replacements, take in trades; fix and resell them. 78  FLEAMARKET BOOTH. Buy one or more categories of merchandise from closeout suppliers and operate a flea market booth. Keep stock in a van and drive to and from. 79  JICAMA FARMING. Grow and market the delicious (and expensive) water chestnutlike jicama (heck'ema), a sweet potato related climbing vine that likes long, hot summers. 80  PRIVATE USED CAR LOT. Rent space to private owners to display their "for sale" cars, etc., on your car lot. Put up a sign, take calls, sell placards to sellers. 81  TAMALES AND TACOS. Take orders for tamales, tacos (or other specialties) in your kitchen for customer or pickup (or delivery to restaurants). Freeze leftovers. 82  POOL TABLE REPAIR. Recover and refurbish pool tables for businesses and private parties, sell materials, buy and sell used tables. Sell and/or repair accessories. 83  JEWELRY BOXES. Make fine jewelry boxes (lined, lacquered, inlaid, shell covered) for gift stores, catalog sales and retail sales. Add music works for extra profits. 84  HOUSE PAINTING. Contract to paint houses and apartments by the hour or job. Pay high school or college kids a percentage or hourly fee to help, provide the paint. 85  FLOOR REFINISHING. Sand, bleach, repair and refinish wood floors. Refurbish linoleum with your own or rented equipment, install new linoleum and baseboards. 86  CUT FLOWER BUSINESS. Grow and supply freshly cut flowers to markets and florists. Offer seasonal or specialize in one or two greenhouse/shade house varieties. 87  BARBQUE. Set up a portable meat smoker to take to fairs, parades and festivals. Have a supply of meat ready, but keep AROMA going to attract more business. 88  AUTO THEFT PROTECTION. Offer a variety of devices, systems and price ranges that you can install and maintain to prevent your customers' cars from being stolen. 89  CONCRETE MOLDING Cast cement statues, birdbaths, waterfalls and lawn ornaments. Offer texture & color variations, custom finishing, water and lighting kits. 90  CROSSWORDS, FOREIGN LANGUAGE. Design and market crossword puzzles: words in one language, definitions in another. Sell to language schools and by mail order. 91  RECIPE SALES. Perfect your favorite recipes. Promote and sell them individually, in small sets, or collections. Sell something that will make the cook look great! 92  SNOW CONE STAND. Sell shaved ice cones from your stand or van: as many flavors as possible. Include other products to increase sales: hot coffee on a cold day. 93  PRODUCT REPACKAGING. Buy bulk products (nails, beans, vinegar) by the ton or barrel. Repackage into neatly labeled packets, pints, boxes and sell for much more. 94  MUSIC, LIVE. Arrange for live music for weddings, parties, festivals, banquets, even club dates. Have several types of groups, styles and price ranges on call. 95  DEHYDRATING BUSINESS. Build your own (solar?) drier to dry inseason fruits and vegetables. When cured, package for retail and/or wholesale customers. 96  CUSTOM CLOTHING DESIGNS. Paint, block print or transfer unique designs on clothing for smocks, aprons or fabrics to be used for clothing, curtains or upholstery. 97  CUSTODIAL SERVICE. Contract to maintain office buildings and warehouses: change light bulbs, fix windows, oil fans, fill cracks, fix leaks, replace locks, replace tile, etc. 98  CONSIGNMENT SALES. With a display area, accept and tastefully display interesting items (only) to sell on consignment. Have forms for written sales agreements. 99  SELFMADE OPPORTUNITIES. Find a "deal" on a piece of new or used equipment (watch the paper; go to sales). Learn to operate it properly and start your business! AND, A FEW EXTRAS... 100  CEILING RENEWAL. Clean (renew) walls and acoustic ceilings in homes, offices, condos, stores. Save customers the price of new paint or ceiling. List with hardware stores. 101  CONCESSION BOOTH. Operate a booth or stand at a recreation area, shopping mall or parking lot. Sell your products plus others that will help attract more customers. 102  CEMENT BLOCKS. Mold small orders of standard or custom blocks (building, stepping stones, curbs) in all colors. Take orders, sell from your "yard" and through nurseries. 103  BEAN SPROUTS. Grow fresh bean sprouts on a rotating basis: have new crop every week or as needed to supply restaurants, vegetable markets and retail customers. 104  AUTO UPHOLSTERING. Install auto and truck headliners, side paneling and seat covers from your garage or workshop. Offer a choice of material and color combinations. 105  MIDNIGHT SNACKS. Prepare and deliver hot coffee, sandwiches and other snacks to night shift workers, night owls and late parties. Advertise on all night radio. 106  BATIK CREATION. Learn this ancient process: dip fabric in wax, crinkle, scratch or melt design into the wax, then dip into dye. Clean, stretch, dry into a valuable decoration. 107  BALLOON STAND. Set up your booth or table with an air tank (helium) and supply of balloons and accessories. Sell at parades, fairs, flea markets, wherever kids are! 108  JEWELRY CREATIONS. Use your talent and ingenuity to mass produce or individually create exquisite jewelry  from virtually anything from diamonds to sliced bamboo. 99 BUSINESSES FOR RETIREES A collection of businesses selected especially for retirees who are interested in augmenting their income through the American free enterprise system. These businesses can be started with minimum training and investment and are all capable of producing extra income. Most can easily be operated by one person or couple and eventually be sold for an additional profit. For best results browse through the enclosed business suggestions and note those that sound interesting. Jot down alternative products and services that come to mind. These ideas are intended to stimulate your imagination. Only you can possibly know your personal qualifications and interests or the current market in your community. As you compile your list of possibilities, take a critical look around your market area. Note what is and isn't available, what is overpriced or inadequate that people in your community will pay for. When you find just the right combination for your particular situation, start preparing for a successful business! The recommended method to prepare for a successful business is to write out a business plan. This is simply an outline of what you plan to do and how you intend to do it. Writing your business plan will force you to organize your business both on paper and in your own mind and help insure your ultimate business success. Check with city hall or the county courthouse on state and local license, tax or permit requirements before making your final selection and investing your available funds. Sometimes a minor adjustment can prevent future headaches! 99 PRACTICAL BUSINESSES FOR RETIREES 01  SHUTTLE SERVICE. Use your van to pick up and deliver commuters in cities. Save your customers the cost of a second car or risk of leaving their vehicles untended in parking lots. 02  COIN SEARCHING. Buy rolls of coins from banks (whatever denomination you can afford). Search for coins worth over face value. Keep these, replace with "regular" coins and trade in. 03  SEED PACKETS. Collect and label packets of selected wild flowers native to your area. Include picture, instructions and folklore on each package. Advertise in garden magazines. 04  CROSSWORD PUZZLES. Construct crossword puzzles for local (then larger) markets; Offer variety of subjects, themes and sizes and subjects in different degrees of difficulty. 05  GENEALOGY. Trace and document family archives. Provide full records to descendants. Offer a package service based on routine checks of information provided by clients. 06  FLEA MARKET. Set up and manage a flea market at your (own or rented) location. Charge for spaces and booths, sell drinks and snacks. Advertise, provide parking and protection. 07  GRAPHOANALYSIS. Upon completion of training, offer your services as a handwriting analyst to individuals, law enforcement agencies and attorneys from your office or by mail. 08  LEATHER HARNESS REPAIR. Specialize in the repair of leather harness and tack (in areas with horses). Go to shows and list with tack stores and advertise in horse publications. 09  SLIDE SHOWS. With your slides and equipment, offer a selection of narrated presentations to interested groups (PTA, church groups, clubs). Mail ads to prospective customer groups. 10  MUSIC BOXES. Assemble, finish and install music works in standard models and your own unique music box creations. Sell through ads and displays and to local and catalog stores. 11  SEMINAR PROMOTION. Conduct business or learning seminars in your area of expertise or hire experts to cover virtually any subject. Lease the hall, promote, sell tickets and snacks. 12  UMPIRING. Work as an umpire for little league, company or institution teams (any nonprofessional sports). If necessary, start as a volunteer for experience. Move up when qualified. 13  ARROWHEADS. Collect and make (with deer horn and leather glove) Indian arrowheads for hobbyists, displays and demonstrations. Give lectures, presentations, hold classes. 14  PET PHOTOGRAPHY. Specialize in pet portraits: in their home, your studio or in a "natural" setting. Go to dog shows and take pictures of all willing subjects (the losers too!). 15  NATURE'S PRODUCTS. When in an area with wild products (hickory nuts, maple syrup) that you can harvest, do so! Make sure to clear with health regulations in your area first. 16  FLEA MARKET BOOTH. Buy one or more categories of merchandise from closeout suppliers and operate a flea market booth. Keep stock safe in a van and drive to and from the business. 17  REAL PEOPLE DOLLS. Make and dress doll representations of real people (heroes, historical, client/client's kids). Include info card; present in attractive glass display boxes. 18  GAZEBOS. Build, sell, deliver and install standard and custom gazebos. Design some to sell as doityourself kits, which can either be picked up or delivered to the customer. 19  ADULT DAY CARE left. Operate a left to look after elderly and/or handicapped people. Offer TLC, refreshments, games activities and assistance, but not "health care". 20  NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS. Compile, publish and distribute a neighborhood newspaper with local news and opinions. Include lots of names (balance required), sell copies and ads. 21  DRIVING SERVICE. Drive other people's cars for them: drive second car to their new home, be their vacation driver, deliver car/truck/RV to them at the station and take the bus home. 22  OPINION SAMPLING. Contract to conduct opinion polls in your area  by phone, doortodoor, or on the street. Work with businesses, media, list with an ad agency, or just place ads. 23  BOOKBINDING. Set up a bookbinding and book repair service in your shop. Advertise and list your service with libraries, bookstores, printers, schools, literary clubs, collectors. 24  WOOD NOVELTIES. In your wood shop, make whirlibirds, small cabinets, and novelties to sell at flea markets, wholesale to local stores and sales through mail order catalogs. 25  GREETING CARD MAKING. Design and print (have printed) standard and custom greeting and all occasion cards. Include personalized, area, school and "company" oriented versions. 26  CRAFTS INSTRUCTION. In your own craft shop (or the public library), conduct doityourself craft courses and projects for pupils. Don't overlook special projects just for children. 27  ELDERLY TRANSPORT. Provide scheduled "taxi" service for elderly and/or handicapped. Run regular daily routes with side trips and shopping "sprees" in between scheduled runs. 28  PASTE CRAFT. Glue unusual fabrics onto hard surfaces (trays, dishes) to sell in craft shops. Sell finished items and also the materials. Teach the art and sell doityourself kits. 29  FIREWORKS. Put up a lockable stand and big sign in a prominent (legal) area. Sell fireworks in season and lease the booth and BACK of the sign between fireworks seasons. 30APPRAISALS, HOME. Make official residential appraisals for home owners who want to sell, insurance companies, lending institutions and prospective buyers. Give written certificates. 31  BALLOON STAND. Set up your booth or table with an air tank (helium) and supply of balloons and accessories. Display and sell them at parades, fairs, flea markets, wherever kids are! 32  HOME HANDYMAN. Perform handyman services for those who can't or don't have time. Make it clear what you do and get paid for your time, not fixing things. Save customers money! 33 REPORTING, LOCAL. Gather information and write items about your neighborhood, club or town for your home town paper. Make your articles interesting to potential readers in the area. 34  JEWELRY BOXES. Make fine jewelry boxes (lined, lacquered, inlaid, shell covered). Sell them to gift stores, catalog sales and retail. Offer music box works as optional extras. 35  LAPIDARY (GEM MAKING). Operate a "rock shop" in your garage. Buy rough semiprecious material and fashion them into beautiful stones. Sell mounted, unmounted gems and jewelry. 36  HOME SITTING. Agree to stay in OR look after houses, apartments while owners are away (water flowers, remove papers, turn on lights). Call the owners in the event of emergency. 37  RAG DOLLS. Make and sell rag, sock and similar stuffed dolls in your own unique fashion. Attach your own label and offer on consignment to stores in your area and nationwide. 38  STAMP DEALING. Buy, sell and/or trade postage stamps of the USA and/or world. Buy in bulk, sell packets, mixture sets and singles to beginning or intermediate collectors. 39  CANDLE MAKING. Turn a hobby into a profitable business. Design your own line, offer custom styling, scents and special effects. Between orders, make a variety of items to display. 40  PICTURE FRAMING. Make or assemble unique picture frames for stores, artists and clients from driftwood, scraps and unusual fabrics. Set up jigs in your shop for standard sizes. 41  KITCHENWARE RENEWAL. Specialize in the renewal of fine cutlery, pans and wood kitchen utensils. Refinish, install new handles, reshape, make pieces to match missing parts of sets. 42  OWNER'S AGENT. Check on and report condition of absentee owner's property (whether rented or vacant). Recommend (and arrange for, when authorized) necessary repairs or maintenance. 43  DRIFTWOOD ART. With sandblaster or wire brush, form and finish pieces into lamps, candle holders, plant mounts to sell. Spend deductible "vacations" collecting your driftwood. 44  COLLECTIONS. Accumulate collectables (glass, matchbooks, baseball cards, comic books). Sell starter collections of lower priced items and higher priced items as individual pieces. 45  HOMEOPATHY. Specialize in natural remedy products and related folklore. Provide information on "reputed" remedial properties, but be very careful not to represent as "cures". 46  WOODEN TOYS. Set up an assembly line to mass produce native wood toys from your shop for large markets. Rent booths at shows to help locate big buyers; contact mail order houses. 47  WILDFLOWER SEEDS. In your travels, gather wildflower seeds. Seal and label, then take home and cultivate to produce seeds for your wild flower packets "from around the nation". 48  BRONZING. Bronze (or pearlize) baby shoes, etc. Make mementoes, awards and trophies. Design plaques and unique bases. Arrange for engraved plates on your plaques. 49 FURNITURE RESALE. Select promising articles of furniture cheap at garage sales and auctions. Clean up, do minor repairs and sell from your home (as your own) for a nice profit. 50  AUTO SECOND OPINION. For a fee, check customer's car to determine repairs needed and probable cost. Provide your expert and UNBIASED opinion. Offer list of several repair shops. 51  RESIDENTIAL POSTCARDS. Take pictures of picturesque or wellkept homes and make into postcards. Mail to homeowners with offer of additional copies at a "special, reduced" price. 52  SEWING CLASSES. When qualified, hold sewing classes in your home. Offer full courses and special "howto" seminars for specific techniques. Sell material and supplies to students. 53  BUSINESS EQUIPMENT. Buy equipment and supplies from bankruptcy sales and auctions. Store until qualified buyers are found, then sell at double or triple your investment. 54  HANGING PLANTS. Specialize in hanging plants of all sizes and descriptions. Display only when in peak condition in various types of attractive pots, holders and hangers. 55  MERCHANDISE APPRAISAL. When qualified, offer a "certified" appraisal service to prospective buyers, sellers, insurance companies and market surveyors in your field of expertise. 56  QUILTING. Make and sell beautiful homemade quilts from "scraps" in your "spare time". Take color photographs of each quilt, attach your label and make up a "catalog" to show them. 57  EQUIPMENT RENTAL. Rent out your tools and equipment (after retirement?). Expand your rental inventory by looking for bargains at sales and buying large items for rental contracts. 58  CHILD PICKUP SERVICE. Pick up and deliver client's kids after school, theater, games. Pickup, deliver to parties, but charge if you have to stay with them until the parents return. 59  CANE MAKING. Gather promising green hardwood pieces (like hickory) and bend and shape into interesting canes. Look for unusual shapes. Add tips, special effects and a nice finish. 60  UNDERCOVER CRITIC. Evaluate restaurants, hotels as a patron. Report findings to owners, head office, or compile info for your own column or dining and accommodation guide. 61 ANTIQUE DEALING. When qualified, buy and sell bona fide antiques from your home showroom or gallery. Visit antique auctions regularly. Keep ads in paper to buy and sell. 62  HERBAL AND SPICE TEA. Blend and sell different blends of herbal teas. Include leaflets with history and folklore in each package. Use uniquely decorated, preferably tin containers. 63  REAL ESTATE ADVISOR. For a onetime fee, represent and advise either the real estate buyer or the seller (real estate agents represent neither really, they just want the sale). 64  RENTAL AGENCY. Represent homeowners or real estate agents. Place ads, show properties, collect rents, have repairs made, check on renters; have units readied for new tenants. 65  COLLECTION AGENCY. Work with one or more professional collection agencies; solicit delinquent accounts from local businesses. Earn a percentage of monies they collect. 66  COOKBOOK PUBLISHING. Publish a cookbook of your own favorite recipes (usually a catchy, interesting subject collection). Promote and sell through appearances, ads and stores. 67  HOME LIBRARY SERVICE. Go to homes (businesses) with large book collections Set up system for clients to maintain, or provide librarian services on a periodic basis. Sell kits! 68  HERB HOUSE. Grow, process and sell herbs that grow well in your area (or greenhouse). Package products separately and in blends (pickling preparations, sausage or chili seasoning). 69  NEEDLECRAFT. Make and sell homemade items (pot holders, bonnets, towel rings). Attach your label and sell on consignment, to mail order catalog companies, or through parties. 70  CHAIR CANING. Use cane, plastic or other interesting materials to weave chair (etc.) seats and backs for clients. Buy old chairs; reglue, refinish, restain, recane and sell. 71  HOUSEHOLD INVENTORIES. Conduct official independent inventories and evaluations of personal collections, valuable furniture and family assets for insurance or probate needs. 72  TOUR ORGANIZER. Arrange for a bus, refreshments and agenda; sell tickets (cancel when not profitable). Offer guides, musicians, box lunches; package rates for outoftown events. 73  TOWN HISTORY. If none exists, "publish" a booklet about your town. Sell direct or offer to merchants to sell or give away as goodwill (consider including paid advertisements). 74  PET TOMBSTONES. Mold concrete markers for pet graves. Place reverse "epitaph" letters into the mold, pour in your mixture, remove and polish into an "engraved stone". 75  CONSUMER ADVISOR. Advertise your free advice by phone of what and where to buy products for best values. Select from a list suppliers who pay you a fee to be recommended. 76  RESIDENCE RECIPROCAL. Arrange for home/farm/condo owners to swap homes for vacations. Charge membership plus a small amount for matches. Advertise for members in travel magazines. 77  BRIDGE LESSONS. Give Bridge, etc., lessons in your home when you are qualified. Charge by the lesson, or course. Hold tournaments, award prizes. Publicize your student's achievements! 78  VENDING MACHINE. Buy, fill and place coin operated candy, gum, cigarette, drink or postage machines in strategic locations. Maintain, refill and collect coins on regular route. 79  BASKET WEAVING. Design, make and sell a variety of your basket creations: plain and decorated (or with arrangements). Sell various fibers, plans and doityourself instruction kits. 80  CAT FURNITURE. Specialize in furniture and accessories for cats: toys, scratch poles, inside and outside sleeping boxes, leashes. Grow, dry and package your own catnip for toys. 81  ALTERATIONS. Replace buttons, let out cuffs, shorten sleeves, turn collars, repair tears for clothing stores, laundries and cleaners who don't already offer this service. 82  HOME SECURITY. Provide clients with thorough check of their homes/businesses. Recommend specific security measures and procedures to eliminate or minimize risks and exposure. 83  BUILDER'S CLEANUP. Work with contractors to clean up after construction jobs. Sweep out building, pick up and haul away all debris and salvage leftovers as bonus. 84  APPRAISAL SERVICE. Make certified appraisals of assets in your area of expertise and provide written evaluations. Schooling or state licensing required in some situations. 85  VIDEO WILLS. After determining legal requirements in your state, use teleprompter and script to record client's official will. Offer update services. Combine with inventory service? 86  BROMELIADS. Specialize in culture of these beautiful pineapple relatives with their hauntingly beautiful bloom. Sell growing on driftwood arrangements for highest prices. 87  POMANDERS. Revive this old Egyptian art: process oranges into hardened, longlasting sachets. Use spice and perfume mixtures and penetrating cloves. Package attractively and sell! 88  BULLET CASTING. Cast and sell custom made ammunition for unusual or special purpose weapons. Build an inventory of popular sizes in spare time; sell kits and supplies. 89  WINDOW BOXES. Build cedar or waterproofed wood flower boxes for windows and to hang over railings. Use rustproof screws or nails. Offer various sizes and tin lined models. 90  BOTTLE STRETCHING. Make unusual vases and figures by heating, stretching and sometimes cutting various bottles in your ceramic kiln. Do custom "stretching" of client pieces. 91 ARTIFICIAL PLANTS. Make (or buy) your specialty artificial flowers and plants. Sell a selection of arrangements, baskets and special occasion creations; take custom orders. 92  ART GALLERY. Display selected art items tastefully in your gallery. Offer your own creations plus those you buy to resell. Accept consignment products to round out your assortment. 93  WELCOME WAGON. Visit and personally welcome new arrivals on behalf of stores, professionals, organizations and officials in your community. Deliver coupons and complimentary offers. 94  CACTUS CULTURE. Propagate, grow, groom and arrange native and exotic cacti for retail and wholesale markets. Prepare information cards about the species to include with each plant. 95  FUNDRAISING. Help local organizations raise money. Plan, promote, organize and manage their efforts. Receive commissions from suppliers plus a percentage for your expert management. 96  CERAMIC FINISHING. Apply your expert finishes, designs and/or details to ceramic ware for retail or wholesale clients. Make items to retail, display or wholesale between jobs. 97  AFRICAN VIOLETS. Specialize in the propagation and care of this popular indoor plant. Nurture, hybridize, put in attractive pots and sell when in full bloom. Sell accessories. 98  CEMETERY CARE. Contract with cemetery associations, authorities or families for small plots to provide care for grounds, or specific services for individual graves. 99  GOVERNMENT AUCTIONS. Go to major auctions and bid on items for subsequent resale. Take the time to learn both the value of the merchandise and auction procedures to get the best bargains. AND, A FEW EXTRAS... 100  DOLL CLOTHES. Difficult work for expert seamstress, but pays well. Work with doll makers, collectors, sell at fairs and through advertisements in doll related publications. 101  DISTRESS SALES. Buy household items cheap at auctions, garage and bankruptcy sales. Clean them up and sell as your own from your home because you need the money. Keep other out of sight. 102  DECOY FINISHING. Buy "carved" bird decoys and handfinish to resell or custom finish for particular clients. Specialize in one specie or offer a variety of birds. Make some into lamps! 103  FISHING GEAR REPAIR. Repair fishing rods, reels and nets. Sell replacement parts. List at boat basins and lakes; advertise in fishing guides, store bulletins and a large sign by the lake. 104  SHUTIN SERVICE. Call and/or visit temporary or permanent shutins on behalf of absentee relatives. Take magazines, play games, read to them. Learn something about them: be a friend. 105  BUSINESS TUTORING. Teach your skills to others, either in classes or individually. Help others get jobs, land accounts and get promotions. Good for retired managers, executives. 99 PARTTIME BUSINESSES FOR STUDENTS A collection of businesses selected especially for college and senior high school students interested in augmenting their income through free enterprise. These businesses can be started with minimal training and investment and are virtually certain to produce extra income. Most can be operated by one or a group of students, and can be sold for an additional profit upon graduation. For best results browse through the enclosed business suggestions and note those that sound interesting. Jot down alternative products and services that come to mind. This list is designed to work with and stimulate your imagination. Only you can possibly know your personal qualifications and interests or the current market in your community. As you compile your list of "possibles", take a good look around your market area. Note what is and isn't available, what is over priced and inadequate that people in your community will pay for. When you find just the right combination for your particular situation, start preparing for a successful business! The recommended method to prepare for a successful business is to write out a business plan. This is simply an outline of what you plan to do and how you intend to do it. Writing your business plan will force you to organize your business both on paper and in your own mind and help insure your ultimate business success. Finally, check with city hall or the county courthouse (and school if you operate on campus) on state and local license, tax or permit requirements before investing. Sometimes a minor adjustment at this stage can prevent future headaches! Finally, familiarize yourself with your subject and start ordering initial supplies (business cards, rubber stamp, ledger). Don't invest too much in initial stock. You will undoubtedly make adjustments as you learn more about your market. GOOD LUCK IN YOUR NEW BUSINESS! 99 PARTTIME BUSINESSES FOR STUDENTS 01  SCHOOL TYPING. Operate a typing/word processing service for other students: type assignments in draft and then in final form. Charge by the page; extra to correct spelling (except for computer spell or Thesaurus) and/or grammar and for rush jobs. 02  AUTO MARKING Engrave (vibrator or drill bit) or etch (acid creme) auto serial numbers on bottom corners of front and rear window glass as a theft deterrent. Expand to etching custom designs or monograms on windows and around mirrors. 03  DESERT GLASS. Collect and sell sunbaked, weatherbeaten glass in interesting colors. Make your own synthetic version by baking and/or sandblasting suitable objects with inexpensive equipment. Advertise your materials in hobby magazines. 04  TEACHER DIRECTORY. Collect and publish names, credentials, photos of teachers in your area or at your school. Include their education, some background, current duties, interests and other qualifications. Sell to educators and the teachers. 05  CHAIR CANING. Use cane, plastic or other interesting materials to weave chair, etc., seats and backs onto casual and picturesque chairs for clients. Buy old chairs with promise at bargain prices to reglue, refinish, recane and sell. 06  CITY LOT CLEANUP. Work with the city to learn of lots that must be cleaned up. Contract to do the required work on lots they designate (city adds bill to owner's taxes). Contact absentee owners to help them avoid future city actions. 07  MINERALS AND GEMS. Where petrified wood, meteorites, jade or other potential gem minerals are available, gather, sort and process them. Sell finished jewelry and polished or cut stones, create displays, including information cards with specimens. 08  GARAGE SALES. Buy a variety of bargain priced items at auctions and other garage sales (learn which things sell best). Clean them up (don't repair). Store until sufficiently stocked, then have your own sale " or "joint" sales at various locations. 09  BALLOON BOUQUETS. Make up and sell balloon arrangements for special occasions. Add other unusual features, such as "talking" strings, delivery in costume or with a song (from a pocket recorder?). Offer extras such as gifts and boxed candy. 10  TELEPHONE SALES. Call listed or phone book names to sell merchandise, services or subscriptions for a commission or hourly basis. Consider adding your own products where you keep all the profit. Pay fellow students to help on a parttime basis. 11  BASKET WEAVING. Design, make and sell a variety of your basket creations: plain and decorated (or with arrangements). Include a small descriptive folder with each basket indicating it's lore and the fact that it was made by a student! 12  CAT FURNITURE. Specialize in furniture and accessories for cats: toys, rug covered scratch poles, inside and outside (insulated) sleeping boxes, leashes, even clothing. Grow (or have grown) and dry your own catnip for toy stuffing and sales. 13  TUTOR REFERRAL. List teacher specialties and availability for private sessions. Advertise for students and schedule them for tutor sessions. Arrange for student led group tutorials (seminars) for reviews to brush up for exams and tests. 14  LITTLE LEAGUE CARDS. Take pictures of small fry baseball, etc., players, posed in uniform with their equipment Have printed on cards with name, position and other ''official'' information. Sell in sets with extra copies for parents. 15  YARD CLEANUP. Clean up yards after winter, evictions or storms. Mow, remove debris, trim shrubbery, water, replant,. fertilize. Place ad after storms for private homeowners; list with real estate and rental agencies for wholesale work. 16  POMANDERS. Revive this old Egyptian art in your spare time. Process oranges into hardened, longlasting sachets. Use your own blend of spice mixtures and penetrating cloves. Showcase when finished in attractive, individual (sealed) boxes. 17  CACTUS CULTURE. Propagate, grow, and arrange native and exotic cacti for retail and wholesale markets. Prepare information booklets about the species for each plant. Expand to hybrids and grafting and unusual specimens for extra profit. 18  CALLIGRAPHY. Easily learned by an artistic person: work through stationery stores, distribute (calligraphed, of course) cards (display one in local paper). Print graduation announcements, wedding invitations, place cards and theme paper covers. 19  SHRUBS. Learn to start, train and nurture shrubs that do well in your area. Display the best specimens in proper sized pots and planting mixtures. Include an info folder with each (care, lore, best uses). Charge to deliver, plant and guarantee. 20  CEMETERY CARE. Contract with cemetery associations or families for small plots to provide care for grounds or specific grave sites. Offer monthly mowing, fertilization, placement of flowers, repair of any damages and periodic checks. 21  AFRICAN VIOLETS. Specialize in the propagation and care of this popular indoor plant (great for small student rooms!). Nurture and sell when in full bloom. Offer accessories: pots, shelves and lighting. Keep small ad in student newspaper. 22  CHILDREN'S STORIES. Compose (or adapt) stories (some with "messages") to relate at kid's parties. Create your own props and encourage audience participation (good gauge of acceptance). When story line is perfected, write it for publication. 23  CHRISTMAS DECORATING. Make up a variety of Christmas (or any holiday) decorations to sell at peak periods. Offer prepared and customized arrangements, for room decorations or to mail home. Buy your supplies in bulk during off season. 24  COIN SEARCHING. Buy rolls of coins from stores and banks, (or "hoarders"). Get a good coin book (from a coin dealer) and search through them for coins worth over face value. Replace with regular coins and trade in for more rolls, repeat! 25  CONCESSION BOOTH. Operate a weekend booth or stand at a recreation area, shopping mall, flea market or parking lot. Sell your own products (for the highest profits), but take others on consignment if they will help attract more customers. 26  CURB PAINTING. Always good for extra bucks! Use a 3 to 4 inch number stencil and fast dry black spray paint to inscribe house numbers on curbs in front of homes. Do the job fast, then request a (usually) $2 to $5 "donation" from occupants. 27  STANDIN DAREDEVIL. Advertise your service to perform difficult (awkward, embarrassing or proxy) tasks for clients (break or ask for dates, apologize, pay overdue debts). Charge for your time, mileage and for any actual physical risk. 28  DAY LABOR AGENCY. Specialize in unskilled or semiskilled workers for shortterm or parttime jobs. Keep list of workers, their job qualifications and their availability. Be able to deliver workers when and where needed for a percentage. 29  DECORATIVE PATCHES. Design patches, quilted names and sewon decals for sweatshirts, garden shirts, working smocks, club jackets. Make up models to show (and sell). Offer custom made garments, patch adding service, or doityourself kits. 30  DELIVERY SERVICE. Contract with local markets, drug stores and pizza parlors to deliver their products on a retainer and/or pertrip basis. Call in for orders or use car phone. Affix appropriate magnetic car signs when delivering for each client. 31  RENTAL PREPARATION. Prepare apartments and rent houses for reoccupancy. Do touchup painting, minor repairs, cover scratches, remove stains, replace bulbs, mow lawn, fix leaky faucets and drains, shampoo rug, clean cabinets, fog for bugs. 32  POPCORN PRODUCTS. Make up, seal and market various popcorn base products. Give your recipes unique, exotic names. Create colorful holiday, special occasion and "message bearing" containers to attract attention and show off your product. 33  DOG HOUSES. Build and sell plain, fancy and custom dog houses in different sizes, shapes and colors. Offer a selection of extras: insulation, treated wood on bottom, air vents, insect repellant and storage space under hinged roof panels. 34  DRIFTWOOD ART. With sandblaster, power or hand wire brush, form and finish interesting pieces of driftwood (and similar specimen woods) into decorations, lamps, candle holders and plant mounts. Collect more driftwood on trips and vacations. 35  CHILD PICKUP SERVICE. Pick up and deliver client's kids after school theater, games and concerts. Deliver and pick them up from parties. Offer reduced rates for more than one child per family; extra to stay until parents return home. 36  LAWN DISPLAYS. Make and sell painted plywood holiday displays for lawns (Santa, religious, bunnies, characters). Offer lighted versions; charge extra to deliver and set up or pick up. Use Outdoor plywood (preferably signboard) quality. 37  AUTO DETAIL APPOINTMENTS. Go to client's home by appointment to wash, wax and vacuum their car. Charge extra to scrub tires, renew plastic and rubber, to pick up the car and have it serviced. Offer polymer wax protection as an option. 38  BABY SITTING SERVICE. Accumulate a list of qualified, bonded sitters and advise them of your rules. Advertise your service and rates. Deliver and pick up sitters if necessary. Pay sitters a percentage of the fee (they keep any tips). 39  GARAGE CLEANING. Contract to clean out garages, sheds and attics for individuals, rental agents and absentee landlords. Charge by the hour or bid on the entire job. Get paid for the work and keep anything of value as a bonus. 40  COMPUTER TUTOR. Go to client's home or office and instruct them to use their equipment and operate their programs. Advertise your consulting service to prospective buyers of equipment and programs. Offer a line of shareware programs. 41  GARDEN PREPARATION. Offer digging (Rototill) service, with options to treat and fertilize gardens for customers. Plant, cultivate, weed, maintain (water, spray), even harvest for extra charges. Very good in rural areas for senior citizen customers. 42  ANT FARMS. Collect ant colonies and construct glass cases to display them. Learn about ants first so your colonies will survive! Include info cards with each case on the type of ant and its history. Sell to pet shops, schools and individuals. 43  GOPHER CONTROL. Contract to rid yards and gardens of these pests. Clean up hills (smooth, water down). Set traps, use gas "bombs", gas engine exhaust or treated bait. Guarantee your service for 90 days; redo if gophers reappear. 44  GOURD CULTURE. Grow or process a variety of interesting gourds. Make them into decorations, utensils, painted figures, birdhouses. Retail finished gourds and doityourself finishing kits. Sell seed packets with instructions to grow gourds. 45  HOLIDAY, SPECIAL EVENT BASKETS. Prepare holiday and special event baskets of fruit, flowers and other "goodies." Have a retail display and take custom orders. Offer local stores baskets on consignment: let stores take orders for you for a commission. 46  HOME HANDYMAN. Perform handyman services for those who can't or don't have the time. Advertise clearly what you do, keep your appointments and guarantee your work. Make money while saving your customers an expensive service call. 47  HOME STUDY COURSES. Sell/rent new and used home study courses. Buy new courses on sale (when available) then buy them back from students (when in good condition). Consider giving tests and issuing a diploma upon successful completion. 48  HOSPITAL GROOMING. Assist patients with nail, hair, skin care in hospitals and nursing homes. License may not be needed when you help patients to "do it themselves". Make appointments for this service or visit on a scheduled or route basis. 49  HOUSE PAINTING. Contract to paint houses and apartments or rooms by the job. Have assistance (other students?) on hand when needed. Increase your profit by supplying quality (only) paint and supplies and bidding on the entire job. 50  PET SITTING. Feed, water, exercise, clean up after and check on pets twice a day (or as agreed) in their homes while owners are away. Offer additional services, such as checking the mail. Call owners or veterinarian if there are any problems. 5l  WOODEN NAME TAGS. With template, scroll or jigsaw, fashion desk signs, name tags, door names, etc., from various types of ordinary and expensive wood and plywood. Apply exotic finishes and use quality bases. Native woods may be popular. 52  EXERCISE COMPANION. Serve as a walking, jogging or aerobics companion for company, morale support and extra protection (good in cities). Carry any necessary (legal) protection (e.g., canes). Help client stick to their exercise schedule. 53  LAWN MAINTENANCE. Contract to mow lawns by the job or season. Charge extra to edge, rake, collect and remove clippings. Refer related jobs to cooperating businesses for a finder's fee or commission. Expand your service as you grow. 54  CUSTOM CLOTHING DESIGNS. Paint, block print or transfer unique or custom designs onto items of clothing: smocks, TShirts, jackets and fabrics to be made into clothing. Use designs, illustrations, cartoons, school emblems, popular themes. 55  LIBRARY RESEARCH. Use our talent and the school library to provide research data, technical details and background information for clients who need subject "homework" performed. Charge by the hour, page or a flat fee for your efforts. 56  LIGHT HAULING. Use your pickup or van to pick up groceries, haul off used bricks or deliver a large doghouse. Advertise with magnetic truck signs, in the yellow pages and paper. Hire helpers when jobs require; even others with trucks. 57  REPORTING, LOCAL. Gather and write items about your neighborhood, school, town for local or home town paper. If necessary work free (at first) to gain experience and "name." For early acceptance, write articles about local people. 58  MACRAME. Make and sell a good selection of hangers and hangings. Take orders for custom work. Find (and keep secret) good sources for materials, make up and sell doityourself kits. Place your creations on consignment in local stores. 59  MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS. Sell a variety of magazine subscriptions from your ''office'.' Use "gimmicky" ads, give credit for leads and prizes for multiple sales. Do lots of telephone canvassing. Have a special every time you call. 60  ERRAND SERVICE. Run errands for individuals and businesses: go to the corner store or across the country. Deliver and pick up messages, important papers, messages. Use helpers (on percentage basis) when needed to ensure prompt service. 61  CHILDREN'S TOWN HISTORY. Write a booklet about your (or their) town just for kids. Include photos or drawings to stimulate and hold interest. Sell copies to doctors, dentists, hospitals and banks (to use in their offices or give away). 62  METAL RECYCLING. Pick up, sort, process (dismantle, clean wires) waste metals from any source. Accumulate into lots, wait for higher prices and sell to salvage yards. Advertise to buy surplus metals from individuals (at lower rates). 63  PAPER ROUTE. Operate one or more newspaper routes. Large routes can be operated with a car, especially with two people. More than one paper can be handled when schedules don't conflict (just don't tell either about the other). 64  SIGN RETOUCHING. Use quality regular or luminous paint to retouch painted signs (no special talent needed!). Charge much less than sign painter and provide results that spruce up your customer's image and save them a good deal of money. 65  PEN PAL CLUB. Advertise for members. Categorize by age, interests, sex, background, educational level, political persuasion, etc. Charge an initial membership fee and then for a newsletter and/or for addresses of "matches" from your files. 66  PET CAGES. Build standard and custom cages for birds, cats, hamsters. Offer a line for travel and/or shipping as well as models that can double as a place to keep the animals while the family is on a trip. Include cage covers and accessories. 67  SHOPPING SERVICE. Go grocery shopping for busy or housebound clients. Get their list, buy and deliver. Use your shopping and pricing knowledge to get clients the best values for their money. Charge a percentage of the bill for your services. 68  POOL AND SAUNA CARE. Provide regular or oncall cleaning and regular maintenance for home and commercial swimming pools and sauna systems. Work with distributors or place ads for your service. Refer repair work for finder's fees. 69  DISK JOCKEY. With your music library, equipment and talent, take charge of the music at parties, business banquets and weddings. Offer a selection of music and package deals. Agree on the type of music and length of time you are to play. 70. TEMPLE RUBBINGS. With a large lumber type crayon and large sheet of rugged paper, copy stone or metal relief designs. Place the paper over the design and rub with the crayon to form a rustic representation. Seal (spray), frame and sell. 71  PUPPET MAKING. Create your own puppets (cartoon, caricatures or custom faces). Give shows at children's (or young adult) parties. Train both "actors" and puppet makers. Charge for your shows. Make and sell puppets, skits and accessories. 72  RAG DOLLS. Make rag, sock and similar stuffed dolls in your own unique fashion. Attach your label and offer to stores in your area. Offer to place them on consignment at first. When satisfied they are ready to sell, advertise nationwide. 73  ROOMMATE REFERRAL. List and "match" singles, etc., desiring company and expense sharing help. Consider apartment needs, proximity to job or school, finances AND personalities. Good parttime project for person with a computer! 74  SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY. Specialize in class, team and school group photography. Sell picture packets, trading photos, graduation photographs, prom and homecoming photos plus pictures of students involved in school events (games, honors, etc.). 75  SEED PACKETS. Collect, sort, label and sell packets of selected wildflowers or plants native to your area. On small, retail packets, include a picture of the grown plant, instructions, history and folklore to help stimulate buyer interest. 76  PLANT INSTALLATION. Work with nurseries. Deliver, properly plant and prune new trees and shrubs. Provide initial watering and starter chemicals. Leave verbal and/or written instructions with customers on how to properly care for their shrubs. 77  SHUTIN SERVICE. Call and/or visit temporary or permanent shutins on behalf of absentee or working relatives. Take books and magazines, play games, read to them, listen to them, and be their friend. Report any problems to the relatives. 78  SNOW CONE STAND. Sell shaved ice cones from your stand or van: with as many flavors as possible. Have a large sign with enticing illustration. Include other products to augment sales: candy, popcorn, hot dogs and coffee for cold days. 79  SNOW REMOVAL. Use your shovel or snow blower to clear walks on a onetime basis or by the season (retainer plus time basis) for private residences and/or business locations. Sell and apply chemicals to help keep waIkways clear. 80  STORM WINDOWS. Advertise each spring and fall to put up and take down storm windows. Expand to a complete winterizing service: caulking, weather stripping. Carry a small supply of needed materials to sell to customers. 81 SCHOOL PERFORMANCES. Record (tape or VCR) school band, plays, recitals. Sell complete copies as well as selected "up close and personal" shots that features one person or a small group. Sell these to proud moms and dads (or the students). 82  BALLOON STAND. Set up your booth or table with an air tank (helium) and supply of balloons and accessories. Sell at parades, fairs, flea markets, ball games, wherever the kids are! Booth can be a light trailer that unfolds, ready to set up. 83  TELEPHONE CANVASSING. Contract with salesmen or businesses to obtain leads for them or customer info from your telephone operation. Charge by the number of leads provided. Hire assistants as needed; graduate to selling your own line. 84  TOWN HISTORY. If none exists, "publish" a booklet about your (or any) town. Sell or consign to merchants for resale. Or, show merchants a draft, sell ads and let participating merchants give them away as "permanent" advertising. Or, both! 85  TRASH CAN HOLDERS. Improve the environment: offer several models, colors and price ranges of dogproof but eye pleasing trash can bins and holders with covers. Arrange to sell new trash cans that fit the holders for an extra commission. 86  WILD BERRIES. Pick preserve and sell wild (only) blackberries, gooseberries, etc. Prepare different forms, but emphasize that they are genuine wild products. If local laws prevent retailing, sell direct to stores, bakeries and fine restaurants. 87  MOTHER NATURE'S SEEDS. In your travels, gather (pick, buy) wildflower seeds. Seal and label, then take home and cultivate carefully to produce seeds for nature's plants "from around the nation." Sell in individual and mixture seed packets. 88  BIRDHOUSE BUILDING. Build and decorate fine, scientifically designed birdhouses and feeders for native birds as well as those that migrate to or through your area. Make up little info folders for each model listing its application. 89  BIRTHDAY LISTS. Compile birthday (anniversary, etc.) mailing lists to rent to merchants. Or, contract to mail cards out each season on their behalf, with their return address. Get info from tax and voting lists, from drawings and contests. 90  FLYER DISTRIBUTION. Hire students to distribute ads, samples, coupons, announcements, doortodoor or on parked car windows. Charge extra to record occupant reactions. Contract with individual businesses and advertising agencies. 91  RESIDENTIAL POSTCARDS. Take flattering pictures of wellkept homes (business fronts, too!) and have printed as postcards. Mail sample postcards to homeowners with an offer of 2 dozen or so additional copies at a "special introductory" price. 92  LOCAL HEROES. Research and write items about local citizens that qualify as heroics (police, scouts, lady pioneers, ancestors, office holders). Sell to local publications, subject's family. After writing several, publish as a collection. 93  PET PHOTOGRAPHY. Specialize in pet portraits: in their home, your studio or in a "natural" setting. Offer a base price for a portfolio. Go to dog shows and take pictures of willing subjects (don't forget the losers!). Sell to proud owners. 94  SAWDUST MOLDING. Use free sawdust (yours or from mill). Mix with glue, sand, pumice, etc. Mold into figurines, lamp bases and other products. Develop your own sawdust, glue, coloring recipes. Make molds with rubber mold compound. 95  MINIATURE GARDENS. Create various sizes of gardenlike display containers of live plants for hospital sick rooms, boxes for balconies, rooftop planters, offices and apartments. Include instructions for plant care so your products will last. 96  BUILDER'S CLEANUP. Clean up nails, wrappers, wood scraps after construction jobs. Sweep out building, pick up and haul away all debris. Salvage leftovers as a bonus. Work with contractors in your area  call them and offer your services. 97  TEXTBOOK EXCHANGE. Buy, sell trade and rent textbooks, reference books and clean workbooks in demand near educational institutions. Offer your service by mail to new students. Advertise that you take in trades (last year's subject for this). 98  SCARECROWS. Create interesting and authentic scarecrows for gardeners and garden displays. Sell doityourself kits, complete with frames, straw, old clothes, frames, hand and face parts. Design and offer winddriven movements as extras. 99  HOUSEHOLD PACKER. Work oncall with moving companies and/or advertise your services to selfmovers (list with truck rentals). Find a source for packing materials and make an extra commission on them. Help customer move for an additional fee. AND, A FEW EXTRAS... 100  ESCORT SERVICE. Supply (legitimate) escorts for social events, official and business functions. Advertise for oncall escorts. Interview, qualify and have bonded. Have strict rules on conduct with signed employee contract agreements. 101  EDUCATIONAL CASSETTES. Make, duplicate and market cassettes: technical studies, bible readings, children's stories, educational lectures (with permission), textbook chapters, language declensions, etc. Sell to stores or rent to students. 102  BUTTON MAKING. Make and sell buttons and badges for promotions, special events and elections (both sides!). Work from a corner in your home; travel to and set up booths at fairs. Prepare buttons in advance for games, causes, celebrations. 103  AUTO THEFT PROTECTION. Offer a variety of devices, systems and price ranges that you can install (and maintain) to help prevent your customers' cars from being stolen. Work with security supply houses and/or design your own deterrents. 104  DAMAGE REPAIR. Restore property damaged by vandalism. Hire fellow students to clean, paint over graffiti, make minor repairs, replace glass. Provide owners with itemized list of duties performed and supplies utilized (for insurance). 105  LAMPSHADES, PHOTO. Make lampshades from translucent, heat resistant materials with family or fellow student photos (with school emblems, pretty coeds, football heroes). Use client's pictures or take them anew to adorn the custom lampshades. 106  COPYRIGHT FREE BOOKLETS. Advertise and sell unprotected booklets from government/state/university printing facilities. Reproduce them (most are copyright free), but do not claim authorship. Offer a selection to customers answering your ads. 107  ETHNIC ARTIFACTS. Buy/create and market one category of products (Indian, Black heritage, German). Focus your advertising and expertise on a specific market segment. It's cheaper than "shotgun" advertising and undoubtedly, more profitable. TURN ANY HOBBY INTO A PARTTIME BUSINESS If you are planning on beginning a business, your best bet is to start out parttime while you are still earning a fulltime income at your present job. If you are like most people who are existing from payday to payday  you don't have a lot of money to invest in a fulltime business. No need to worry! Just use your favorite hobby as your business base and grow from there! There's no telling where you'll be at 2 or 3 years down the road. Perhaps you can even tell your present boss to "take that job and shove it." Wouldn't that be great? Using your present hobby or favorite pastime as your business base has many benefits. Why? Because ANY business you decide to become involved in should be doing something you LOVE  something you believe in  something that you would work at NO MATTER what income it would generate. This will give you the stamina to see your business through the beginning hard times and times when there is more work to do than you can handle. We all know the feeling of doing a job that we hate to do. There is no way we can give it 110% of our abilities because we procrastinate getting through it and just want to get it over with. That's why it is vitally important to dearly love the product or service you have chosen to build your business around. Do you like cooking? Start a recipe newsletter for others who like the same thing and sell your recipes by publishing a simple booklet. Do you enjoy making crafts? Sell them through mail order (be sure and mark up the price for shipping and handling). Do you enjoy working on cars? Print and distribute flyers in your neighborhood listing your prices. Offer a coupon discount for the customer to use on their first auto repair job. Do you enjoy writing? Write a small booklet or howto manual and sell it through mail order or to multilevel enthusiasts. Do you enjoy computer programming? Write a program and sell through shareware groups or even to mail order computer owners. Yes  just about anything you love doing can be magically transformed into a business opportunity for you. Some items may only sell well in your neighborhood, while some products and services do well in mail order. If you decide to sell through mail order, all you need to do is write a simple ad and have it typeset. Start out with a smaller 1inch, 2inch or 3inch ad. Ask the customer to send a "firstclass stamp" or "$1.00" for more information. When they write you, include a 8 1/2x11 sheet detailing your prices. Make sure you have a small order form to make it easy to order your product or service. And of course  include a cover letter stating that you appreciate their inquiry and look forward to doing business with them in the near future. You'd be surprised how many sales have been lost because a business didn't take the time to write a cover letter and personalize the mailing. Also, start educating yourself by reading and researching other homebased businesses. Before I opened up my business I read national publications like "Small Business Opportunities," "Entrepreneur," "Home Office Computing," and "Spare Time Magazine." Although there were some full page ads in there filled with hype (claiming to make me $1 million dollars with a sheet of paper)  the articles are excellent. Don't spend more than $3 for information in the beginning of your business because if a company is legitimate you should be able to call them and discuss the opportunity over the phone with them. Businesses that claim to put you in business overnight should never demand a large amount of money from you. On the contrary  legitimate businesses have nothing to hide and will not charge you more than a few dollars in postage to learn the "whole" story behind their claims. Instead  use these publications, as well as books from the library on starting a business to further your knowledge of the world. Another good move on your part is to invest a few hours by attending a meeting that is sponsored by SCORE from the Small Business Administration in your area. It's free  and the valuable information you obtain from actual people who have been in business before is something that will be extremely valuable in the months ahead. Just call the SBA to find out more information. Yes  it's that easy! Of course, this is only the beginning. As with any hobby, it will take time (probably many months) to realize a profit but think of it this way: Most people that have a hobby know they have to spend money to take part in their hobby. It only makes sense to invest money in advertising your hobby to others so you can eventually make some of that money back in sales for your own business! SELFPUBLISHING: A GENIUS MONEYMAKING IDEA Some "crazed nut" started a rumor that publishing a book costs lots of money. What this "nut" didn't tell you is that selfpublished booklets do NOT! In fact, it's one of the easiest ways to make money in the world and doesn't require any talent! It's true  let me show you stepbystep how it's done: 1. Choose a subject to write about. Select something you enjoy or want to know more about yourself. As just an example, we'll use "Household Hints" (something I personally know nothing about.) 2. Now, to collect the information to put in my book about "household hints" I would go visit my mother, talk to my aunts and cousins, call friends on the phone, and in general  ask everybody I came into contact with to give me their favorite "household hint." After a few months I'd have a lot of stuff. 3. At this point I would start categorizing all this information. I'd put all the stuff about "kitchen tips" in a separate file from "home remedies." Each separate file would be a new chapter in my book. 4. Then I'd begin typing out my book on a computer or typewriter. (You also could utilize the services of a publisher such as Graphico, PO Box 488, Bluff City TN 37618 or Muchmore Marketing, PO Box 50027, Reno NV 89513.) If I was typing it myself though, I would simply number each tip as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 . . . with a title at the top of the page as to what type of "household hint" this particular page referred to. (i.e., kitchen tips, cleaning hints, home remedies, words of wisdom, etc.) 5. Okay. Now the book is ready to print. You've read everything and there are no misspelled words or obvious grammar mistakes. You are ready to see the final result of your labors. How much will it cost? Let's assume that my "household hints" book is going to measure 5" wide by 8" tall (like a sheet of 8 1/2x11" paper folded in half.) There are 2 pages on each side or 4 pages front and back. These are the best size for mail order unless you write a 100page novel. Still with me? My "household hints" book is a total of 24 pages. That means it will take both sides of 6 sheets of 8 1/2x11" paper to print each one of my books. That includes the cover and everything. Based on standard mail order prices, you could have 250 of these books printed for $109 or about 44c each. 1,000 would run even less  $200 or about 20c each. That's cheap! Even if I sell each one for just $3, I'll make a great profit! (A good mail order booklet printer we recommend is Kem's Graphics, 549 Friendship Rd, Seneca SC 29678.) Another method of saving money with printing of booklets is to have the mail order printer print them at the same price you would pay for 8 1/2x11", 2sided printing (around $25 per 1,000) without having them collated, folded and stapled. This way, your cost would only be a total of $150 per 1,000 or 15c per booklet. This method is great if you want to do some of the work yourself. Your only expense would be a saddle stitcher from an office supply store. This is a longarmed stapler and the cost is around $45. Of course you would not want to make this investment if you were only going to be publishing one book per year  but if you plan to go into heavy production, it would be worth your while. I personally don't care to do this myself because I'm saving tons of money. I'll get paid in the long run for my time. 6. Now, the only thing left to do to make my book a success is to sell them and make some money back. One idea would be to call all the people who gave me the information for the book. I'd put a price tag of $5 on the cover and offer it to my aunts, cousins, friends and coworkers at a discount of $3 or $2. Everyone whose name or contribution is in a published book will want a copy for a keepsake  at least. So you see; it's not that hard to create your own moneymaker. There's no hidden secret to it. You don't have to pay $29.95 for the same information. We're GIVING it to you free of charge. Every single human being has a book inside of them! Everybody knows something that other people don't and everybody has interests that other people don't have the time to learn about. There is a subject that interests you that would interest others. Guaranteed! So, get busy. Pick a subject, gather the information and type it up! You'll be a hero before you know it. Neighbors will begin to label you as a notorious writer. You'll be able to hold your head high, and you'll be able to start putting ",Writer" at the end of your name on your business letters. Won't that be something? RICHES THROUGH CREATIVE THINKING! When solving problems after you have exhausted the normal means of coming up with the solution, think in terms of unorthodox methods. Vary your thinking and try to solve the problems by creating something completely new and irrelevant. Come into the problem through the "back door". Research and curiosity go hand in hand in solving the toughest problems. Quite often the answer is so simple, it is not obvious to us. Use an organized plan to work with and record the results logically so you will have a format to follow and a basis for review as you proceed to create something new or solve an "unsolvable" problem. Creating new programs or products by association is another method of thinking. You first think of an object which is similar or adjacent to the subject item, then continue the "chain" of associated thoughts until new and useful programs or products emerge as ideas. Relate these ideas to the subject item by trial and error or by analysis of all the variables involved. Plain old fashioned "daydreaming" is another method of creative thinking. Make up a fantastic story in your mind and try to visualize (dream) your way to a successful conclusion based on what results you are trying to achieve. Consider all the alternatives to what you're trying to come up with. Gather together and analyze all the data you can find about the subject. If you get into a rut, leave it lie. Go to some other aspect of the puzzle. come back to it later. Quite often as you progress it will suddenly appear, bright and clear. When it does, write it all down so you won't lose it as your mind drifts to the next step. Complete one step at a time. By breaking it down to size you can solve it in segments. Don't try to override your mistakes. Recognize them and bury them so they will help, not hinder, your progress toward your creative goal. Don't further confuse the issue by doing so much study and research that there are too many roads to take. HOW TO DEVELOP MONEY MAKING IDEAS! Ideas: It isn't the billions of ideas, that pop up in the minds of humans around the globe that make money. Very few ideas are worth the time it took for the thought. Most ideas are fleeting "sparks" that go no place and are forgotten before the next day. Of the ideas that are good, very few are followed up and ever end up as a worthwhile development in the market place. Most people are just not oriented to do anything about their ideas, while others believe it would take too much of their time and money to follow through to completion. This leaves the market place wide open for the person who learns how to "Create" Profitable Ideas! There are three major formats you can use to create profitable idea: 1. Find something that already exists, the presence of which has never been known before. 2. Invent something. Most inventions are merely new arrangements of things that have already been invented. 3. Alter or improve in any number of different ways something that already exists. As you "Create" ideas, write them down. What you dream up can be your key to great wealth. Keep your mind "open" as you go through each day. What did you notice in the department store that would reduce costs, save money or increase sales if some simple procedure were added or something changed? Ideas for improvements are one of the most valuable things you can contribute to society and at the same time add to your bank account. To create ideas for improvements, consider every possibility and alternative for the thing you want to improve. Learn to create ideas by evaluating all the different aspects of theproduct, method or concept you are interested in. Put your imagination and subconscious to work and write down your thoughts pertaining to each of the things you expect to improve. Use the New Wealth, "Idea Format" that follows as your guide for creating MoneyMaking improvements. Idea Format: List the things you want to improve:  Why should it be improved?  Who will benefit from the improvement?  What is wrong with it at the present time?  Did someone else cause a problem with it?  How do you propose to improve it?  Do you have the facilities to do the work required?  Do you have the knowhow to do the work required to improve it?  Exactly what part needs to be improved?  Should it be smaller? Larger?  Should the color be different?  Would more activity help make it better?  Could it be combined with something else to make it more practical?  Would a different basic material work better?  Is it too complicated, could it be simplified?  Would a substitute be more meaningful?  Is it priced too high?  Would a change in personnel help the situation?  Can the shape be changed to advantage?  Can a new marketing plan make the difference?  Is it safe?  Can it be mass produced to bring the unit cost down?  Should the appearance be changed... streamlined?  Is there an adequate guarantee?  What can make it appeal to a bigger audience?  Would new packaging or trade name enhance it?  Can it be made heavier, lighter, higher or lower?  Can it be franchised?  Is there a good maintenance program to back it up?  Can financing be simplified?  List ways to increase production:  List ways to increase sales:  List ways to reduce costs:  List ways to increase efficiency:  List ways to improve quality and increase profits!  What can be done with it to satisfy more people? This New Wealth "Idea Format" will start the ideas "sparking" and as related ideas come to mind write them down in every variation you can think of. Do not judge the good or bad points of the ideas as they materialize to you, just write them down and judge them afterwards. You will stop the flow of ideas if you are critical of your thoughts before you put them on paper. When you have answered everything you can about the product or concept and know how it fits in with your plans, sit down and evaluate all the details you have written. After you have found (created) a good idea, follow it up with questions on what should be your next move in order to do something about it, then act! Get it moving. Expose it to the world with sufficient tests to determine the value! Come up with ideas that are still in the processing stage rather than get stuck on several vague points that may be worked out later as your subconscious goes to work. If your idea fails, so what; you are just that much closer to finalizing another one, then another... until a useful more valuable idea is born. Every manufacturing plant, retailer, attorney, accountant; every business person, large or small, cannot continue to operate in the competitive world of today without someone in the organization constantly coming up with new and better ideas! Old ideas drop by the wayside as new ideas take their place. Old companies without new ideas fade away. Those who learn and know how to create ideas and anticipate the changes needed, as the future evolves, have the opportunity to be a great success with big moneymaking potential! Another "tool" you can use to help dream up that million idea, is to spend several minutes each evening, relaxed with your eyes closed. Pick any object that comes to mind and try to change it in your "mind's eye". Change it in every manner you can think of to improve it. The following evening pick another subject or object and repeat the process. Soon you will be using 20% of your brain power instead of the 10% normally used by the average person. As your knowledge and "brain power" increase so will your bank account. Just think what we could accomplish if we could get the other 80% of our brain power working? On second thought, let's not try to get 100% efficiency out of your human computer . . . we would probably blow up the world for sure. Protecting Your Idea When you have come up with a good idea, write a full description of it and make a sketch if necessary. Place the written information, the sketch and any other pertinent facts or documents in an envelope addressed to yourself. Have the post office seal the envelope with a date stamp over the flap, then send it to yourself by registered mail. Keep the envelope, unopened, in the event you need to prove ownership. Of course if your product has a properly registered trade mark, has been copyrighted, or you have a U.S. patent you are protected from infringement. A Few Idea "Sparks" ! When you come up with an idea, program or product that is so superior in style or performance that it is unbelievable you may need a notarized statement to assure your customer you are offering an honest deal. Make a habit of examining each piece of correspondence you receive, taking care of it right at the time, do what is necessary right then. Never put it aside to be handled a second time if it all practical. This can save more time than anything else for an executive who handles a large amount of correspondence and mail. You can also save many more hours each week by doing several of the most important things that need to be done each day before you take up other, time consuming important details. Another good way to "spark" ideas is to go through the classified and want ads in the newspaper ... Also the yellow pages of your telephone directory. As you read, think of something that would be of value to the company or person, or enhance the item you are reading about. In summary, learn to develop ideas from observing everyday things and details. Think of what could make something better. Dwell on things that have a large marketing audience, something that everyone needs and wants. Write your ideas down. Put a pencil and pad at your night stand. When you remember a good dream... don't just lay there, by morning you will forget it... Jot it down on the pad. You will be surprised what you can dream up! Maybe the million dollar idea will magically appear on your pad tomorrow morning! 27 SERVICE BIZ TO START NOW! There are hundreds of opportunities in the service arena offering lowcost startups and high profit returns. Almost all can be run from home. There's still room to grab your share of the multibillion dollar service industry. Most of them the exception is the private postal left shopcan be run from home. 1. MONOGRAMMING Everybody loves to see their name, logo or company team emblazoned on a cap, tshirt, towel, apron, etc. You can set up a monogramming business right at your kitchen table. Promote the business at crafts shows or via flyers, and ads in local newspapers. For startup information, contact Meistergram at 3517 W Wendover Ave.,Greensboro, NC 27407, 9198546200, OR 8003210486. 2. CARPET CLEANING You can start your own residential and commercial cleaning service by tying in with a carpet cleaning giant such as Duraclaen International, Inc., or Von Schrader. You can start on a parttime basis and develop the business into a fulltime enterprise. To find out how to get the machines and equipments, contact two companies that can help set you up with your own business. Von Schrader, 1600 Junction Ave.,Racine, WI 43403, 4146341956, 8006266916: Duraclean International, Inc.,2151 Waukegan Rd.,Deerfield, IL 60015, 3129452000, 8002517070. 3. BUTTON MAKING. You can start your own button making operation for $29.95. The folks at BadgeAMint will get you started with an easy to use hand press, designs, pinned backs and instructions. Buttons can be assembled in less than a minute. Contact BadgeAMint, 348 North 30th Rd.,Box 800, Lasalle, IL 61301, 8002234103. 4. BLIND CLEANING. The Morantz family are the innovators in blind cleaning machines. Their slogan "Dirty blinds can put you in business," and plenty of entrepreneurs are making a mint cleaning blinds with a nifty, portable blind cleaning machine from Morantz. For more information write to S. Morantz Inc.,9984 Gantry Rd.,Philadelphia, PA 19115 or call 2159690266, 80069 LI'L BABY. 5. WINDSHIELD REPAIR. Car owners hate those bubbles and cracks in their windshields caused by stones or other debris bouncing from the pavement. There are a few companies who teach you how to set up your own windshield repair biz and supply you with the materials. Startup costs vary. Contact: GlassWeld, 20578 Empire Blvd.,Bend, OR 97701, 8003212597: Ultra BOND, Inc., 14076 Highway 215, Moreno Valley, CA 92388, 8003472820: Optikleer Glass Repair, NVS Corp, 48 Springvale Ave.,Lynn, MA 01904, 8006956224: Glass Mechanix, Inc.,10170 NW 47th St.,Sunrise, FL 33351. 6. CHIMNEY CLEANING. Heating homes with wood burning stoves is a cheaper alternative to electric or natural gas heat. Because the creosote (sap) accumulates on the inside of the chimney, they must be cleaned regularly. (Creosote is responsible for causing chimney fires.) You can start your own chimney cleaning business for about $2000. For more information on this business opportunity, contact August West, 38 Austin St.,Worchester, MA 01601 or call 5087535544, 8002254016. 7. AUTO DETAILING. Consumers who shell out $30,000 plus for a Mercedes or a BMW are not about to cut costs when it comes to keeping their car in cream puff condition. Entrepreneurs show up at the owner's home or office and completely wash, wax and clean the interior of the car. The experts at The Curtis System have researched and produced a line of products that help auto detailers set up a business. They will also teach one exactly how to do it. For more information contact The Curtis System, 8818 Mountain Rd.,Box 250, Stowe, VT 05672 or call 8003343395. 8. ENGRAVING. It seems like one has to be an artist to start an engraving business. But Paragrave Corporation can teach just about anyone to do it. Their system involves a process that is as easy as tracing. For more information contact Paragrave Corporation, 1455 West left St.,Orem, UT 84058 or call 8018258300, 8006247415. 9. ADVERTISING SPECILATIES. There are thousands and thousands of potential customers right in your region and through mail order. Advertising specialties are pens, caps, paperweights, flashlights, key chains, etc. that feature the name of the company along with address and phone number on it. The items can be given out at grand openings, sale days, holiday gifts, or trade shows. Your business is making them (and making money). For more information, contact BASCO, 9351 DeSoto Ave., Chatsworth, CA 913114948. 10. TEST MACHINES. The incidence of drunk driving is reaching an all time high. Bars, restaurants and diners are increasingly working with entrepreneurs who will set up alcohol test machines; bar patrons can actually check their alcohol levels. For more information contact Communidyne, 636 Anthony Trail, Northbrook, IL 60062, or call 7084982444, FAX # 7084986369. 11. ROOF MAINTENANCE. The Pace Products, Inc. company has developed a seamless spray process to fix roofs. The service can offered to residential customers as well as commercial customers. In fact, some Pace entrepreneurs have regular contracts with firms such as General Motors, American Airlines and Holiday Inns. For more information, Pace Products, Inc.,quality Plaza, 11775 W. 112 St.,P.O. Box 10925, Overland Park, KS 66210. 12. MOBILE CAR WASH. Part of the appeal of many service businesses is bringing the service directly to the customer. Mobile car washing is a good way to go where the money is. You can purchase a mobile car wash operation from the Express Wash Company. For more information contact them at 908 Niagara Falls Blvd., N. Tonawanda, NY 141202060 or call 4164664164. 13. GIFT BASKET BUSINESS. Today, more and more people want to ease and convenience of picking up the phone and ordering a gift. A gift basket business could be the perfect parttime or fulltime money maker for you. One who knows how to start and run this business is Carol Starr who runs Starr Gift Baskets in Houston, Texas. Carol has written a manual on how anyone can start this business in their area. She also includes information on how existing shops and businesses can add a gift baskets as an additional service to their customers. To order the manual, send a check or money order for $12.95 plus $2.50 for shipping and handling to Starr Gift Baskets, 8045 Antoine, #147, Houston, TX 77088. 14. HOME INSPECTION. There are dangers lurking in residential homesbad water, radon, asbestos, termites, etc. Home buyers who shell out an average of $150,000 for a home these days don't want to buy a lemon. Home inspectors charge about $200 to come in and make a complete check of the home. Many states are requiring that homes be inspected before the sale is finalized making the opportunity even brighter for entrepreneurs who start a home inspection business. You can learn how to get started and run this business from the franchised operation AmeriSpec or through National Property Inspections. For more information, write or call AmeriSpec Home Inspection Service, 1855 W. Katella Ave.,Ste 330, Orange, CA 92667, or call 7147448360, 8004262270; National Property Inspections, 236 S. 108th St.,Ste.,3 Omaha, NE 68154, 402339807, 8003339807. 15. UPHOLSTERY CLEANING. You can purchase a turnkey operation from Von Schrader or Foley Belsaw and start your own upholstery and drapery cleaning business. For information contact Von Schrader at 1600 Junction Ave.,Racine, WI 53403 or call 4146341956, 8006266916; Foley Belsaw. 16. COMPUTER PORTRAITS. A photo/computer system enables one to put any photo on just about any item including mugs, buttons, calendars, tshirts and many more items. You can purchase a package that will set you up in business. Contact the following companies for information on their packages and supplies: Cygnus Systems, Inc., 1719 W. Zartman Rd., Kokomo, IN 46902 or call (collect) 3174537077: CASI Creative Amusement Service, Inc.,156 Fifth Ave.,Suite 323, New York, NY 10010. 17. INSTALL SLIPPROOF SURFACES. As our population is getting older, more Americans are slipping and falling in their homes and in commercial establishments. Even young folks can fall on wet surfaces near a swimming pool or shower/tub. You can start a business installing slipproof surfaces in residential and commercial buildings. SafTGrip is a product that you install. For information on how you can become a Saf_TGrip distributor contact: RYKO Technology Inc.,39863 Grand River Ave.,Suite 93, Novi, MI 48375 or call 8002SaftTGrip (800 2723457 ext 233). 18. VENT CLEANING. Atypical one day restaurant vent cleaning job can earn you $250 to $500 based on the rate of $65 per hour. Nice work because you can do it at night and on weekends. Many states are now regulating the cleaning of restaurant ventsmeaning, they have to be cleaned on a regular basis. For more information on how you can start your own vent cleaning business, contact Black Magic Vent Cleaning, 1821 Mountain Rd., P.O. Box 250, Stowe, VT 05672. 19. TUB & TILE RESTORATION. This is a great business opportunity to start anytime of year. It's part of the home remodeling boom and there is plenty of potential accounts no matter where you live because just about anyone can use a little touch up on their tub and tile surfaces. This refinishing/reglazing business can be started by tying in with a leading franchisor such as PermaGlaze or you can choose to go the independent route and purchase a startup package from Ameribrite. Write to them for more information so that you can make the choice that is right for you. PermaGlaze, 1638, South Research Loop RD., Suite 160, Tucson, AZ 85710, 8003327397 or 6027229718; Amerbrite, 170180 East Hillsboro Blvd.,Deerfield Beach, FL 33441 or call 3054812929. 20. PRIVATE POSTAL left. Busy people don't have time to wait in line at the local post office. The local post office also fails to offer a lot of services that private postal lefts provide such as ; fax machines, printing of rubber stamps, answering service, and much more. For information contact the franchise Mail Boxes, Etc. at 5555 Oberlin Dr.,San Diego, CA 92121, 8004560414; or go the independently owned route through PostNet International, 2225 E Flamingo Rd.,#310, Las Vegas, NV 89119, 7027927100, FAX # 7027927115. 21. SPECIAL EVENTS PROMOTIONS. Ease of operation and low startup costs characterize all the entertainment promotions designed and packaged by Keith Namannythe man who brought us the world renowned Rocky_bots. Keith has a wide range of promotions at that are portable and fun to play. They can easily set up in bars, restaurants, corporate events, backyard parties, you name it! Call Keith Namanny at the World Robotic Boxing Association and ask him to send you a free brochure on his 6 business opportunities called the "Six Pack Of Success!". Call 7127742577. 22. AUTO PAINT TOUCHUP. Autoowners would love to find an inexpensive way to fix those dents and pings in their fenders and car doors and those scrapes on the roof or bumper. You can start a business offering auto paint touchup that fits the bill. The Dye Team Color System company has developed an auto paint touchup business opportunity package. For more information write to the company at 9511 Gue Rd.,Damascus, MD 20872 or call 3012532134 or 8003461977. 23. LANDSCAPING LIGHTING. Home owners who want to make castles of their environments are hiring companies to come in and set up special effect lighting around swimming pools, gardens, driveways and to do their holiday lighting decorations for them. Shop owners love this type os service, too. The DekraLite company has designed a number of lighting designs for entrepreneurs. The small business owner shows a client portfolio of what's available and then DekraLite ships the kit along with detailed instructions on how to set it up. No designing on how to set it up. No designing or electrican's experience required by any means! For more information, write or call DekraLite at 17945 Sky Park Circle, Irvine, CA 92714 or call 8008888319, FAX # 7148529539. 24. VINYL REPAIR. Just about every dinner, movie theatre, restaurant booth, doctor's office and auto or truck could use a little repair work on their vinyl. That's quite a broad client base. You can start your own vinyl repair business with help from VIP, 2021 Montrose, Chicago, IL 60618. 25. CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING. A wholesaler of picture frame mouldings and materials can supply small business framers with products and inventory to start and run a highprofit custom framing service. For more information on their complete equipment package write or call Tennessee Moulding & Frame, Inc.,1188 Antioch Pike, Room 14C, Nashville, TN 37211, 6158328159, ext. 7423. 26. PROFESSIONAL BILLING SERVICE. There are plenty of small businesses out there who could benefit from having a small firm take control of their billing. You could be that entrepreneur. The Blue Jay company can show you how to set up and run a professional billing service. Contact Blue Jay at 2579 Clematis St.,Sarasota, FL 34239 or call 8133653357. 27. DIET & WEIGHT LOSS; About 75% of the American population is overweight. The emphasis on being fit and slim is everywhere in this health and beauty conscious 1990's decade. Entrepreneurs can still cash in on the fitness boom by offering computerized diets. Small business owners who get into this field don't have to program a computer to create the diet plans because they can be tie in with two companies who do all of the computer work, Entrepreneurs work with their clients and present the computergenerated daily menus. There are two companies we've heard of who offer this service. The CompU Diet Program has been developed by United American Marketing, Inc. Another company offering this service is Diet Guidance International. DGI provides all of the necessary training and followup support. For more information on CompU Diet contact United American Marketing, P.O. Box 249, Milford, MI 48381 or call 8009429900. To reach Diet Guidance International write 2131 Pierce St.,Ste 5, San Francisco, CA 941159973 or call 80077664347 CHOOSE A BIZ THAT'S RIGHT FOR YOU Owner and founder of Corporate Music is G.E. Maas. We asked Mr. Maas for some tips and how wouldbe entrepreneurs should go about choosing a business opportunity. Mr. Maas recommends that you start by listing businesses or hobbies that are of interest to you. After choosing several opportunities, find out if you really need a franchise or distributorship to go into that particular business. Some individuals offer doityourself startup kits through magazine advertisements. Often these doityourself startup kits through magazine advertisements. Often these doityourself kits are enough to help individuals start many different types of businesses. Some franchisors, such as Complete Music, says Mr. Maas, actually list the support that is provided, as well as what is necessary to provide that level of support for yourself with their help. If you decide not to go it alone, he suggests, contact those businesses that interest you. Ask to be sent their information packets AND a list of owners (with phone numbers) that you may contact on your own. This is extremely important because the literature that is sent out does inform, but is promotional in nature, whereas, actual owners or distributors are actively involved in the business you are investing. Once all the information is received, narrow down your choices as much as possible. Check out those remaining companies as if your future depended on it, says Mr. Maas, because it does. Have your attorney and accountant examine the legal and financial documents respectively. Weigh the pluses and minuses of each company. Contact as many owners or distributors as possible. Find out first hand their thoughts on home office support, profitability, company integrity and the day to day enjoyment of operating their business. Ask them any questions that would help you make a good, informed decision. "Any company you are considering should encourage you to contact their owners or distributors," he explained. Mr. Maas also suggests that after you've made your decision, sleep on it. Do not allow yourself to be rushed into any decision by anyone. "a good company will want you to take the time necessary to make decisions that are right for you." HOW TO GET A HIGHPAYING JOB WITH THE GOVERNMENT "What really qualifies you to hold a government job is not your job skills or past work experience, but your determination." One common misconception about government jobs is that they are hard to obtain. that is just not true. They are, however, hard to find out about. In fact, the most difficult part about getting a government job is finding out about it. In some cases a government position may go unfilled for weeks or even months because word never gets out that it is available. What really qualifies you to hold a government job is not your job skills or past work experience, but your determination. First, find a position that interest you and, keep trying for iteven if is currently filled by someone else. (You'll want to be prepared in the event they quit, move, or get promoted.) So, where do you go to find a government job? And if they are so hard to locate, how do you find out about them? Once you find out a job you are interested in, how do you go about applying for it? The answers are so simple that they may surprise you. Once you find a position your are interested in, you'll need to fill out STANDARD FORM 171., better known in the government as SF171. This is the standard federal government application form. No matter what other forms you are required to fill out during your application process, you'll need SF171, but more on that application later. WHERE TO LOOK People tend to think that the only jobs advertised in the newspaper are for car salesmen and welders, but this is just not the case. in fact, if you look through the want ads in a typical Sunday newspaper, you will find a good number of "whitecollar" jobs. Sometimes the government uses the newspaper to advertise position openings, both blue and white collar, but only when they have a special reason for doing so.* However, though some jobs are advertised in the newspaper, most are not. In fact, less than 10 percent of all government jobs are advertised outside the government offices. When the government places a newspaper ad, it is usually for a specialized position. Because of the nature of the position, there may not be enough qualified personnel within the department to fill the job, yet too many potential applicants to go on a search nationwide. In this case, the government will place an ad in the newspaper to bring in as many applicants from the local area as possible. When you apply for a civil service position through a newspaper ad, you can be assured that you will have plenty of competition. Your chances will be much better if you start your government job search at a Federal Job Information left. To locate a Federal Job Information left in your area, call information or look in the white Pages of your telephone book under U.S. Government Offices. FEDERAL JOB INFORMATION leftS The government operates Federal Job Information lefts (FJIC's) in nearly every major city in the country. These lefts are operated by the Office of Personnel Management and were created to locate people for government employment. In a FJIC you will find announcements of every federal job in your area. In some lefts you will also find announcements of jobs with the state, city, and county governments in the area. Often, the lefts cooperate with local university and college job placement offices to fill vacant positions. however, if you are looking for a job outside your area, you will need to contact the left in the city ot area your are interested in. STATE EMPLOYMENT SECURITY OFFICES Another place to look for government job listings is the Employment Development Office, more often referred to as the "unemployment office." While most people think of the unemployment office as the place to go for money when they are between jobs, they do not realize that government agencies are required to place job announcements at the Employment Development Offices in their areas. They also keep listings of every federal job available. So, they can be an excellent source for finding government employment. FEDERAL AGENCY ANNOUNCEMENTS The easiest way to locate a federal job is to investigate openings at each particular agency. Most federal agencies have offices in each of the 10 federal regions of the United States. Each of these offices has announcements of jobs within their own agency, and often announcements from others. If you want to know what government positions are open within a particular agency, the regional office will furnish you with that information regarding their region. No matter how you discover the particular job you will be applying for with the government, you should acquire a copy of the Vacancy Announcements Bulletin before you attempt to apply for the job. This bulletin is a vital source of information that may make the difference between landing a government job and being lost in the shuffle. The vacancy announcements, or "job postings" as thy are sometimes called, are available form you local Office of Personnel Management, Federal Job Information left, State Employment Security Office, or the government agency that is in need of personnel. Each vacancy announcement will provide you with such information as: THE ANNOUNCEMENT NUMBER: This number, sometimes called the "identifying number,: is the code that designates the job opening within the agency. For example, there may be many job openings for a waste handler within the government, and many within the confines of the Navy, but the announcement number identifies the particular job you will be applying for. THE DATE ISSUES: this is the date that the job opened for application. It is sometimes referred to as the :issue date: or "opening date.: CLOSING DATE: Some agencies require that your application (SF171) be in their hands by this date, others only that your application be postmarked by this date. If you have any doubt about the needs of the agency you are applying to, call them and find out. Sometimes the agency will accept a telegram stating that the application will follow shortly if you cannot get it to them in time. POSITION: This gives a detailed description of the job, including the federal schedule and grade classification. this listing will also tell you whether you are applying for a career position or a :dead end" job. The way to determine this is by the federal schedule number. If more than one job grade is listed (GS11/12, for example) it means that you will start at the lower level and, depending on your performance, move up to the highest. If only one job grade is listed, it means that there is no chance for promotion (although this may still be a good "footinthedoor: if you are willing to transfer to another position). Some opportunity announcements may also include a statement saying that this position is part of a promotional ladder plan. There is also an announcement as to how many positions are available under this particular job category. For highly specialized jobs there may only be one or two. Standard entrylevel jobs may be quite plentiful or, if they are hiring on a continual basis, may be listed as :open". LOCATION: Tells you where you will be working and which department or agency you will be working for WHO MAY APPLY: Here you will learn what government employment status is required for application. Some positions, especially highly technical positions, require previous government service. DESCRIPTION OF DUTIES: Here you will learn what government employment status is required for application. Some positions, especially highly technical positions, require previous government service. DESCRIPTION OF DUTIES: Read this section very carefully. It describes the various duties and responsibilities of the job. In your resume and application you will need to compare these duties as closely as possible with your education and past jobs. QUALIFICATIONS/EXPERIENCE: Described here are the minimum qualifications used to determine an applicant's basic eligibility. They are judged on a yes or no basis. Either you are qualified for the position or you are not. EDUCATION: The minimum level of education required to hold the position is stated along with the educational equivalent, if any. In most cases there will be some type of experience you can substitute for college education. (Often you can offer college education as a tradeoff for experience.) BASIS OF RATING: this is where you will find out if you will be required to take any type of entrance exam, security clearance rating test, or any other specialized test for your position. Often the agency will accept the application if you have not taken the test as long as you complete it by a certain date (most likely by the date of the interview.) If you fail to complete the test with an acceptable score by that date, your application will be disregarded. In order to make arrangements for these tests you will need to call the staffing specialist listed on the announcement. He will tell you where and when the government test will be administered. Remember that each agency will use its own format when sending out job opportunity announcements, but all must include the basic information in the form. If you have this any questions about the announcement, you should contact the personnel staffing specialist whose name appears on the form. Calling or writing the agency directly can harm your chances of getting the job because it is illegal for anyone in a supervisory position to discuss a job vacancy with an applicant. FILLING OUT THE SF171: Now that you have zeroed in on the agency and position that you want, it is time to go about getting that job, and there is only one sure way to do that: make yourself look better than everyone else who applies. Of course, if you could take your prospective employer to your job site with you, you could show them how effectively you perform your duties, and they would be able to see how the job you are doing relates to what they want you to do. But you can't. That's where your STANDARD FORM 171 (SF171) comes in. Remember, this form will be speaking for you when you are not there to speak for yourself. A form which is handwritten, has fingerprints or chocolate stains on it, and several "whiteout" corrections leaves a negative impression. A form which is neatly types shows your attention to thoroughness and detail and leaves a very positive impression. If you cannot type the form yourself, ask a friend to do it or hire a professional typist. If you are unable to have it typed, print the information very neatly in black ink. When filling out the SF171, don't leave any space blank. If you find something that doesn't apply to you, simply write "N/A" for " not applicable" in the space. This lets the hiring agent know that you read the instructions and did not just forget to fill in the blank. Generally, although it may seem like a lot of extra work, it is best to submit a separate SF171 for each job you apply for ( unless those jobs are in the same job series with very similar job requirements). Otherwise, you should tailor each SF171 to each job you apply for. Also, make answers brief and to the point. You don't want to alienate the reader by giving them too much to read. Since many government jobs require that you deal directly with the public, having " people" skills is a big plus. Therefore, be sure to list all education and training that you have had dealing with people. This would include psychology, public speaking, stress management courses, etc. Also, be sure to list all related supervisory positions (i.e. being vice president of a club or other type of organizations) as well as the names of all organizations that you belong to. This indicates that you enjoy interacting with people. Finally, make sure you understand every question before you make a mark on the paper. A sloppily or incorrectly completed SF171 may indicate to the government hiring official that you do not follow instructions carefully. Filling this form out properly can make the difference between getting interviewed for your targeted position or not. HOW TO SELL YOUR IDEAS FOR HUGE ROYALTIES Here is a way to cashin on your ideas. If they are unique some company just may be willing to pay you big bucks for some of them. This report explains how to protect your ideas to make sure that you get paid for them. Your salable ideas can be something tangible or intangible. Ideas include such things as mechanical things, chemical compounds, designs, works of art, advertising and business plans . . . ideas for improving a design, flavor, etc, of an existing product or service. Many thousands of dollars are paid out to "idea men" each year by industries. If your ideas will increase production, increase sales, or improve the product  they are willing to pay substantial money when they accept it. First, you must know how to "protect" the ideas that you generate. Ideas that are made public by word of mouth, or even in writing, become public property unless you first make an agreement to retain all rights to your ideas. Let's say that you have an idea for increasing the sales of an existing product for company A. Write them a letter similar to this one in duplicate: Gentlemen: I have developed a new idea for increasing the sales of your product. This new method will not increase your costs in any manner. If you are interested in the full details I shall forward them to you upon receipt of the below signed agreement. AGREEMENT TO REVIEW IDEA We the undersigned, agree to receive in confidence full details about an idea for increasing the sales of Widgets as submitted by (your name). It is further understood that we assume no responsibility whatever with respect to features which can be demonstrated to be already known to us. We also agree not to divulge any details of the idea submitted without permission of (your name) or to make use of any feature or information of which (your name) is the originator without payment of compensation, to be fixed by negotiation with (your name) or his lawful representative. It is specifically understood that, in receiving the idea of (your name) it will be reviewed in confidence, and within a 30 day period we will report to (your name) the results of your findings and will advise whether or not we are interested in negotiating for the purchase of the rights to use said idea. Have them sign both copies and return one to you. Then you must submit complete details of your idea to the company. After they review your idea, they must, by law, follow the instructions of the agreement. Many "idea men" are earning substantial money following this procedure. The sky is the limit, but make darn sure that you first get the agreement signed prior to disclosing your ideas otherwise, no go! To increase your chances of having ideas accepted, spend lots of time preparing complete, minute details before you submit them. This is the key! Include illustrations of drawings if it's necessary to get the story over. Bonus Report HOW TO GET FREE SUBSCRIPTIONS TO MAGAZINES There are a large number of "Trade" magazines, journals, newsletters, and newspapers which are mailed absolutely FREE to interested firms and individuals who merely ask for them. These are not, of course, the common magazines you find on your local newstand but they do offer much valuable reading. To locate the names and addresses of magazines which offer free subscriptions, simply go to your library and ask the librarian for a copy of: "Standard Rate and Data". This book lists all trade magazines circulations. Any magazine stating it has "controlled circulation" normally indicates it is available free. All you have to do is write the magazine and ask them to place your name on the mailing list. Try to indicate interest or some connection in your occupation, or avocation with the subject matter of the magazine. 37 INSTANT MONEYMAKING PARTTIME BUSINESSES Introduction You're on the road to success  Congratulations! You bought this report because you want information on starting a business, parttime at first, without investing a lot of money, yet one that will quickly be a moneymaker. You'll find a number of them here. In each one we give the basic concept of the business, what product or service it provides to your customers, and how it is operated, and (if any are necessary) what equipment or facilities or help will be needed. But whatever business you choose, remember that no business can succeed without your effort. remember that determination and hard work are the mother and father of success. If you supply those, and use the information we supply, you can't miss. Good luck! 1. Television Computer Pictures Lease a computer printer and a video camera and a monitor screen that produces largesize, high contrast portraits of customers in 30 seconds, while they wait. You will find this a surefire crowd attracter, as the printer chatters away. Set up in a crowded resort are. Charge at least $4 a picture, framed in a simple mat, almost all of which is gross profit. Net cost of all materials, about 8 cents. Hot source: The equipment to do this is available from Sketch Division, 140 Wood Road, Braintree, Mass. 02184 2. BadgeMaking Rent a small multilith printing machine and a badge sealing machine, and using selfadhesive Presstype for typesetting, design and set cut sayings for the badges. Sell as a custom service, making slogans to order, or make a wide range of farout sayings in bulk quantities and sell them to local gift and novelty shops for resale. 3. Run a "Consignment Shop" It requires very little capital and accepts goods for sale from members of the public and sells these items for them on a commission basis. You might try a wide variety of items at first, to see what sells best and most regularly. 4. Picture Framing, In Your Own Home Relatively inexpensive materials with a good sense of color and style and a reasonable ability with carpentry tools, will build a large customframing business, since people who spend money on art won't skimp on the frames either, if they want a goodlooking result. 5. Rental Equipment Be the source of supplies for doityourselfers. Working only Saturdays and Sundays, when they do, you rent out power tools, such as circular saws, jigsaws, reciprocating saws, gasoline chain saws, electric drills, electric planers, belt and orbital sanders, routers, paint sprayers, wallpaperremoval steamers, staple guns, pumps, home cleaning machines, Rototillers, and other equipment for daily fees. Operate out of your garage. 6. Talent Bureau, For Kid's or Adults' Parties Using local ads, or your own contacts, line up 10 to 20 local entertainers, magicians, comics, puppeteers and other talents, and supply them for parties, club meetings and other functions. Have a list of films you can also supply for the same, or other groups, which they can project themselves, if they wish, or you will supply an operator. 7. Throwing Parties for Profit Everyone loves to go to a party, and nowadays some smart operators make a mint running them for everybody who wants to attend. You can too! Hire a hall and a band, plan to set up a bar (if you can get a temporary liquor permit), and promote the hell out of it with ads, handbills, bumper stickers and lamppost posters. Special parties aimed at a particular group do best, such as singles, or underthirties, or overforties. This idea is especially good in college towns. 8. Start a Hobby left Make money on your unused space (and maybe the power tools you've already paid for!) Turn your basement into a woodworking left, your spare bedroom into a photo darkroom, and your garage into a pottery workshop with a wheel and a small kiln. Rent the space and equipment by the hour, expand into more hobbies as time and money permit, and charge additional fees for instruction in any of those fields you're good at. 9. Organize a Babysitting Service One of the troubles most people find is that their babysitter is always busy just the night they want to go out. You set up a service, finding good reliable teenage girls and boys, middleaged or older women, and act as a gobetween, providing sitters whenever your customers want them, collecting the fees, and paying the sitters. Advertise your service, and handbills housetohouse locally being a good way. 10. Make Money From Your Hobbies Are you an expert at something that you do at home for fun? Then make it pay off for you! If you're a gourmet cook, give cooking lessons in the haut cuisine. If you're an accomplished painter in oils or watercolor, offer a portraitpainting service. If you're a skilled carpenter, design and make custom cabinets to order. Almost any hobby you're good at can be turned to making a profit if you think about it carefully, and decide who could use your expertise  as a consultant in that field, if nothing else. All you really have to do to get started is to place an ad! 11. Publish a Buy/Swap Paper in Your Town Get money from both ends in this sweetheart deal. Publish the weekly paper with classified ads from the public offering stuff for sale, arranged according to category, and charge the people for their ads (some operators let them pay only if and when they sell, but in that case charge them a percentage of the selling price, 5% for smaller items, 2% or 3% for automobiles), and then sell the newspaper (suggest price is 25 cents) as well, through local newsstands and by subscription (in the mail). Once you have a fairly decent circulation, local merchants will also pay you for display ads, because they know people really read buy and swap newspapers religiously covertocover. 12. Do Custom Photo Developing Quality is essential, and speed is generally also required, although you can charge a premium for rush service. If you already have an elaborate darkroom setup in your home, so much the better, but if not it can be fitted in anywhere you have room, the basement being ideal, since windows are not a requirement. You must be able not only to develop and print every normal size of film from 35 mm to 8" x 10" but handle enlargements up to a minimum of 30" x 40", and preferably 5" 8*" or more, and do copying both of opaque material and slides. An ability to offer retouching, restoration and coloring as well is helpful, even if you have to send that specialized work out. 13. Publish a PartTime Jobs Directory Make this a newsstand book, as well as offering it, with small ads, by mail order. List all the possible jobs people can get parttime, especially angling it at college kids on vacation, teachers after school hours, housewives with time on their hands, and moonlighters looking for parttime second jobs. 14. Run a Children's "Explorer Club" Take kids on Saturday and Sunday outings. Ten kids each day, to zoos, farms, theaters, children's shows and sports events. A small microbus (rented and, or eventually bought) can be used to travel in. Many parents are delighted to have weekend days to themselves, even though it costs them some dough. 15. Be an Instructor Teach whatever you know. Your trade, profession, cooking skills, a second language, woodworking, chess, photography, knitting, karate, bridge, auto repair, etc. People will pay for good lessons in these useful and enjoyable skills. 16. Run a Floor Scraping/Polishing Service You buy or (at first) rent, a heavyduty machine, and do the cleaning and waxing of fine, hardwood floors. If the floors are in very bad condition, machine sand them and them completely refinish them with modern superdurable polyurethane finishes. 17. Operate a Children's Hotel This is sort of a "boarding house" for kids while their parent go away for a weekend or twoweek vacation. Requires a large house, and preferably, a large yard or grounds, swings, slides, and facilities useful for kids. Must be done very responsibly and carefully. Also, don't take very young children (less than 9 or 10 say) because they may require too much dressing, feeding, etc. 18. Start a MailOrder Business Write a booklet (or get the reproduction rights to over 1000 reprintable reports. 28 page guide "Reprintable Riches" lists over 1000 reports that you can copy and sell for huge profits. Send $1 or 3 stamps to Infopreneur, Box 96, Dept K18, Purdy, MO 65734-0096 to get your copy of this valuable guide) about something people really want to know about, print a few hundred copies, and place some small ads. You'd be surprised how much money you can make. Sell modern copies of outofprint uncopyrighted material or books. Or sell something unusual you make at home, providing that it is something really useful to your prospective customers. Or sell some of your ideas such as #2 badges, #37 genealogy, and others. 19. Operate a Xerox Copy left The secret of this is not just selling one or two copies of each original (although on a 300page original manuscript, that can add up too), but using one of the latest highspeed highquality massproduction Xeroxes so that you can compete with the guys operating those quick printing services, by turning out 100 or 200 resumes, letters, or circulars just as fast, and probably a great deal faster, for the same (or potentially less if you want to be competitive) money as they charge. This way you have two kinds of work, giving you twice as many customers, and twice the profit opportunity, and with the right location, a chance to clean up. If you want to offer even more services, and have the space in your shop, as well as the potential customers, you can offer Xerox reductions (New York Timessize page down to 81/2"x11"), and Xerox copies in fullcolor, which are remarkably good. The color machine will also make color copies directly from 35 mm. color slides in one quick step. Of course, you can consider using other brands of xerographic copiers, such as IBM, Kodak, Savin, Canon, Minolta or others, but although you may theoretically save money, make sure of their service policies, and that they have field servicemen in your locality, or you may find yourself stuck with a copier on the fritz for a week, which could ruin your business. 20. Be a Local News Correspondent For big city papers some distance from your town. When an event occurs in your area you write the story for those papers (they have correspondents in many big places but not in most small towns or isolated areas) and they pay you for it. This is known as being a "stringer". If you're good with a camera, take photos to accompany the story. 21. Campground StoreOnWheels Use either a panel truck or a camper body on a pickup truck chassis. Go to public park areas and campgrounds selling charcoal, paper plates, watermelon, ice cream, eggs, milk, bread, insect repellent, sunglasses, newspapers, etc. 22. Create a New TourBus Service Even in affluent America, not everyone has a car, and even those who do often prefer to leave long trips to a professional bus driver. and although there are bus tours offered to some familiar places, there are still so many interesting, even exciting, places people would like to go to, if they were offered the chance. Here's where you come in. You must be creative about it, and study all the sixState areas around your hometown, to discover some original and different places to travel to on day trips which will "turn on" your prospective customers, and get them to sign up. The rest is easy. You get competitive quotes (from commercial bus companies) for a quality bus to do the roundtrip, with a suitable stopover at the destination point (enough to do the sights, shop and maybe eat as well). Then you figure you tour price per person so you can make a profit even if the bus is only half full or so. Then you have a safety margin  and if you sell every seat you will do very well indeed. Then all you have to do is sell. You put little ads in your local papers, paste up flyers wherever you can (supermarkets are good), contact local travel agents (of course you give them a percentage on what they sell for you), local hotel clerks, etc., and you also contact women's clubs, religious groups, fraternal societies, factory social organizations, and so on (they may take a whole bus, or even two, and you give them a special price, naturally). 23. Run a Pet Hotel Service For dogs or cats or both. People will pay high fees to ensure highquality care fo the animal they love. Separate kennels for each animal are essential. Good food and adequate care and attention must be assured also. You can hire responsible teenagers to help you. Advertise with posters in pet shops, veterinarians' offices; and if they're cheaply available, get the mailing lists of local ASPCA groups and other animal welfare groups, as well as membership lists of dog and cat clubs. 24. Sell SecondHand Kids Clothing Children usually outgrow their clothes rather than wearing them out. So many families have such clothing left around. You collect it, paying nothing or as little as possible. Then you resell it; you can do the selling by ads, handbills or through your church or community groups. 25. Breed Tropical Fish This requires only a moderate amount of space and a small investment in equipment. Properly done, it needs only a small amount of your time yet can make you a good profit. You can obtain your beginning stock from the large wholesale dealers. You can sell direct to consumers (the hobbyists) or to stores in your area. Hot Sources: Betta Tropicals Inc., 1310 Unionport Rd., Bronx, NY Tropa Co., 1685 3rd Ave., New York, NY 26. Make Plastic Engraved Signs All you need is a simpletooperate machine that engraves lettering in various types onto sheets of plastic of many colors, finishes and sizes. Perfect for signs for merchants, banks, doctors, dentists, schools and colleges, private front doors, and many other uses. Hot Source for the Machine: New Hermes Engravograph from New Hermes Inc., 20 Cooper Square, New York, NY 10003. 27. Sell Christmas Trees Seasonal, but if you have the time in the few weeks before Christmas, can be a good money maker. Find a vacant storefront or lot, or space inside a larger building, where people pass by. But be sure to order a supply of trees enough in advance. And if you own country land that is not being used, consider growing the trees yourself. Your first crop can be ready in four years, with steady crops from then on. 28. Open a Rubber Stamp Business Manufacture them in your basement. The materials needed are cheap. And the finished stamps can be sold to many people, storeowners, offices, individuals. You can market them by mail and through local merchants. Hot Source: The machine and a financing plan to buy it ar available from: Rubber Stamp Division, 1512 Jarvis Ave., Chicago, IL 60626 29. Camper's Equipment Rental Service With urban living, the backtonature movement is growing and camping is becoming very popular. Rent out tents, sleeping bags, portable propane stoves, chairs, etc. Demand identification from customers and reliable security (keeping one of their credit cards is good). 30. Operate a KeySafety Service Each customer is sold a special tag to put on his or her key ring. It says "Drop in any mailbox" and has the address of a post office box that you rent (Don't use your home address for the same reason your customers shouldn't have their home address on their keys  dishonest people finding the keys will come prowling around). You assign each customer's tag a code number from a list that you keep. When someone's keys arrive at your post office box, you return them to him, for another fee. 31. Be a Used Car Buying Consultant With a knowledge of cars, plus the proper test equipment (for checking the engine, transmission, brakes, fontend alignment, and chassis), you go with your customer to check out the used car he is thinking of buying. Advertise your service next to the ads offering used cars for sale. After a while you will get to know people in this field and you can pick up more money by acting as a middleman in sales between private individuals. 32. Sell "Loss Leaders" for Profit This may sound contradictory but it isn't. Supermarkets aren't the only ones who use loss leaders. A good mailorder idea is offering a cute item (worth much more) for $1 in women's magazines, giving prompt delivery and including with it stuffers (ads with order blanks) for half a dozen more expensive items. The repeat business on the other items makes the $1 offer profitable. 33. Baby Items Rental Service You rent everything needed for a baby's care  stroller, playpen, high chair, etc. When the customer's baby outgrows them you rent to the next couple. Of course, you must advertise, and also send direct mail pieces to all couples with new births (get their names from hospitals and newspapers and list brokers). 34. Operate a "Give a Party" Service You rent out everything needed for a party: tables, chairs, punch bowls, table cloths, cutlery, and napkins. You can also supply waitresses and bartenders, finding them through agencies that supply temporary help such as Manpower. But if you can find good workers yourself, you can save the agency fee and make more money. 35. Operate a Miniature Slot Car Racing Track In your basement (or wherever you can fit it) build a large and elaborate miniature slot car racing track (with a least 6 or 8 slots). Local kids, and often adults, pay you by the hour to race, using either your cars or theirs. To boost interest you can hold monthly contests with trophies. 36. AllService Service You line up the specialists in fixing almost anything, and take care of getting them customers by delivering handbills to homes and placing ads in supermarkets and local papers. They pay you 5% of every job refer to them, which can soon add up. 37. Genealogy for People Who Want Roots You seek out the records in public or university libraries, county courthouses and elsewhere, as necessary, for a sliding fee, depending on the size of family, difficulties in getting information, geographic dispersion, and other factors. 33 WAYS FOR AN ARTIST TO MAKE MONEY 1. Sketching stores 2. Sketching houses 3. Selling caricatures 4. Travelling painter in holiday resorts 5. Silhouettes 6. Portrait sketching 7. Suntan body tattooing on beaches 8. Calligraphy 9. A comic strip artist 10. Cartoons for T.V. 11. Political and gag cartooning 12. Painting murals 13. Making decorative screens 14. Personalized greeting cards 15. Making ceramic statuettes from photos 16. Oil portraits from photos 17. Painting on china 18. Wood carving 19. Interior bottle painting 20. Oil portraits for executives 21. Modelling busts for the wealthy 22. Interior designing 23. Customdesigning wallpaper 24. Designing packages for manufacturers 25. Store window displays 26. Decorating children's rooms 27. Sign painting 28. Promoting art shows 29. Art consultant 30. Mobile art gallery 31. Art rental 32. Art exchange 33. Teaching art 99 WAYS FOR A PHOTOGRAPHER TO MAKE MONEY SPECIAL EVENTS 1. Photograph vocational school graduates 2. Wedding photographer 3. Photograph large parties 4. Photograph at banquets 5. Prom and graduation photos 6. Photograph fashion shows 7. Photograph trade shows 8. Wedding movies 9. Photograph new stores' grand openings 10. Photograph local performances 11. Commencement day photographs PEOPLE 12. Take pictures of people mounted on ha horse 13. Make polaroid pictures of seamen going abroad 14. Take pictures of people wearing special costumes 15. Photograph people on a fancy motorcycle 16. Take pictures of people in nightclubs 17. Take pictures on the beach 18. Antique photo shop  produce 1890's type portraits for the "nostalgic crazy" 19. Take I.D. photos 20. Take passport photos 21. Specialize in legal photography 22. Produce community yearbooks 23. Produce company year books 24. Produce composites for models, actors and actresses 25. Photo fund raising 26. Take slowmotion sports film for athletes 27. Take executive portraits 28. Photograph children on a pony 29. Take portraits of children in department stores or malls 30. A day in a child's life  an album of 30 pictures 31. School photography 32. Santa Claus portraits 33. Travelling industrial photographer 34. Ilustrate manufacturers' sales manuals and catalogs 35. Ilustrate manufactuers' sales manuals and catalogs 36. Public relation photos for business 37. Photograph store fronts 38. Produce progress photos on construction sites 39. Real estate photography 40. Produce illustrated promotional brochures for business firms, hotels, etc. 41. Interior decorator's photographer 42. Photograph instore merchandise displays ON THE ROAD 43. Foreign fashion photography for textile and fashion manufacturers 44. Photograph tourists in famous places 45. Summer camp photographer 46. Roving festival photographer 47. Sell scenic prints to gift shops and hotels 48. Offer personalized vacation photo packages to resort clients 49. Sell slide shows of interesting places or subjects 50. Build a mobile portrait studio in a trailer or van 51. Be a slideshow lecturer on different subjects and geographic locations MAKING NOVELTIES 52. Candid keychain photos 53. Photo stamps 54. Color postcards for hotels or resorts 55. Exceptional color scenes for calendar printers 56. Personalized Christmas cards  with family portraits or photos of family home 57. Photo buttons 58. Photographs on coffee mugs 59. Photographs on shirts 60. Imprint a photograph of a child on the face of her doll 61. Photo sculptures 62. Bookends adorned with any desired photographic subject 63. Decorative photo plaques 64. Personalized photo matchbooks 65. Instant personal postcards by gluing polaroid shots to blank postcards 66. Stationery imprinted with personal portraits 67. Custom calendars SERVICES 68. A microfilming service 69. Photo duplicating service 70. Slide duplicating service 71. Restoring old photos 72. Producing filmstrips 73. Duplicating negatives to sell 74. Slidetitling service 75. Making offset negatives and plates 76. Collecting old photos to make into books 77. Making photomurals 78. Retouching service 79. Custom photo lab 80. Blowing up photos, on the spot 81. Photo oil portraits 82. Selling prints to photo agencies 83. Camera rental 84. Camera exchange 85. Repairing cameras 86. Teaching photography MISCELLANEOUS 87. Making postcards 88. Publicity photography 89. Photographic essays for various publications 90. T.V. news freelancing 91. Selling news photos 92. Taking and selling peculiar photos 93. Selling local photos for travel magazines 94. Aerial photography 95. Documentary film making 96. Photos of human interest 97. Composing photo guides for tourists 98. Photographing accidents for lawyers and insurance companies 99. Photographing parades 49 WAYS FOR A HANDY PERSON TO MAKE MONEY WOODWORKING 1. Building shelves 2. Stripping furniture 3. Floor refinishing 4. Making stereo cabinets 5. Making twoway pet doors 6. Designing closets 7. Refinishing and rebuilding furniture 8. Building patios 9. Building fences 10. Building secret compartments 11. Framing pictures 12. Making knives 13. Caning chairs PAINTING AND DECORATING 14. Painting houses 15. Whitewashing 16. Hanging wallpaper 17. Wall decorating with rollerwall CLEANING 18. Graffiti removal 19. Janitorial service 20. Windowwashing service 21. Fish tank cleaning service 22. Carpet cleaning service 23. Chimney sweep service 24. Doortodoor car wash service 25. Miniblind cleaning/ installation 26. Exterminator service MISCELLANEOUS 27. Glass etching 28. Weather stripping 29. Repairing vinyl 30. Recycling tires 31. Gym and locker maintenance 32. Pool maintenance service 33. Upholstering 34. Building barbecues 35. Grocery cart maintenance 36. Golf club renewal service 37. Curb  painting house numbers 38. Garden statue repair service 39. Auto parking service 40. Parking lot striping service 41. Driveway sealing service 42. Spray painting cars and trucks 43. Doll hospital 44. Screen and storm window service 45. Building carports 46. Changing patios into porches 47. Dog cleaning and clipping service 48. Boarding kennel for pets 49. Cemetery maintenance service 66 WAYS TO MAKE MONEY WITH HANDICRAFTS USING WOOD 1. Make house signs 2. Make walking canes 3. Refinish oldfashioned children's desks 4. Massproduce quality chopping blocks 5. Make wicker baskets 6. Handcarve picture frames 7. Make wooden greeting cards 8. Specialize in creating quality doll palaces 9. Build miniature furniture for dollhouses and adult collectors 10. Create decorative birdhouses USING CLOTH AND NATURAL FIBERS 11. Knit personalized sweaters 12. Specialize in batik wearing apparel 13. Tiedyeing 14. Make oldfashioned quilts 15. Make quilts that tell a story 16. Sell macrame products from home, a shop, or mail order 17. Custom rugmaking 18. Create doll clothes and restore old dolls 19. Create unique ethnic and character dolls 20. Produce custommade sandals 21. Make personalized leather snapon bracelets FROM GOURDS 22. Create eating and drinking utensils from gourds 23. Make lamps with gourds 24. Make gourd planters 25. Make gourd totem poles 26. Create gourd creatures 27. Create birdhouses from gourds FROM MISCELLANEOUS MATERIALS 28. Make face masks 29. Make copper cameos from photographs 30. Make babies' hand plaques 31. Make dolls with faces similar to their owners 32. Moulding and casting faces 33. Dry flowers 34. Make booksafes: hollowedout books for hiding valuables 35. Make personalized coffee mugs 36. Make jewelry from beads or seashells 37. Make bulletin boards 38. Embellish and redecorate household products 39. Make salt and pepper shakers from cow horns 40. Make custom wastebaskets 41. Create miniature replicas of antiques out of wood or ivory 42. Crate giant replicas of small insects 43. Decorate decanter stoppers with small clay caricatures of people 44. Offer natural tattooing with sun stencils 45. Make ceramic plaques of newborn infants' foot or hand prints 46. Make lamps from wine jugs, seashells, etched metal, rocks, transparent plastic, etc 47. Make money from mobiles 48. Make mosaics to decorate functional items 49. Make ceramic lawn decorations 50. Manufacture sundials 51. Make costume jewelry 52. Make weather vanes 53. Make unusual products from seashells 54. Manufacture terrariums 55. Make and sell bottled boats 56. Tint and sell pussy willows 57. Decorate penny match boxes 58. Make bottle gardens 59. Create novelty bottles 60. Manufacture stained glass windows 61. Make sculpture candles 62. Gift wrapping service SELLING 63. Operate a crafts marketplace 64. Operate a crafts consignment shop 65. Become a sales agent for handicrafts 66. Sell handicrafts at fairs BACKYARD CASH CROPS  YOUR GUIDE TO HIGH YIELD PROFITS Many large farms have had trouble making a profit in the past few years. However, there are several good ways to make money farming small gardens plots. Thousands of people are using these methods to earn parttime or fulltime incomes. This report will outline several profitable ways that you can use to quickly begin producing cash crops. Don't misunderstand, I'm not talking about growing common crops like tomatoes and so forth. No. The secret of cash crops from small gardens is growing special, hardtofind products that will bring you premium prices. And, in many cases, the demand far outstrips the supply for these crops. You'll also learn how to open a small roadside stand selling common and special vegetables and fruits. Something else. You'll not have to engage in "backbreaking" labor. While there is some amount of work required, there are techniques that can reduce the amount of labor once you are established. For example: raspberries can be heavily mulched each year to eliminate future weeds. BUSINESS OVERVIEW Raising backyard crops is a fairly easy business to set up and operate. You'll need at least 1/2 acre of ground. Preferably, 1 acre or more. Then you'll need to master the gardening techniques for growing top quality crops. After that, it's simply a matter of choosing how you want to market your crops for cash. PROFIT POTENTIAL How much money can you earn with this type of business? It depends on several factors, including: crop selection, quality of your crop, amount of acreage planted, crop yields, and effective marketing. Your earnings can vary from $2,000 per acre up to $20,000 per acre each year with the speciality crops described in this report. So this is not a business that can make you rich "overnight," but with several profitable acres your income can be good to excellent. KEYS TO SUCCESS There are several keys to success in this type of business. They are: (1) Plan ahead to grow the best kinds of crops for the amount of space you have, and type of soil and climate in your location. (2) Learn the best growing techniques (and easiest methods) for producing high yield crops. (3) Buy the best seeds, bulbs, trees, and vines and plant them in the proper manner. (4) Learn good marketing skills for selling the crops. These simple, and obvious steps are easy to take. Anyone can successfully raise cash producing crops with a little effort. Of course, some labor is involved in preparing the ground like weeding, trimming, packing and selling. However, some of these cash crops require less attention than common crops. Also, you could employ a high school student for 1 or 2 days per week to help out with portions of the work. Raising cash crops is also a very low risk and low cost business to start. In most cases, your start up costs can be $100 to $200 (or less) if you already own a suitable section of land. So you are risking very little money and you should always get some cash return even in a poor growing season. TOOLS NEEDED You do not need a wide array of expensive tools at the start. A shovel, hoes, wheelbarrow, seeds, plants and fertilizer are about all that is needed. However, it's quite handy to have (or have access to) a 5 horsepower rototiller. A tiller is a powerful assistant in the upkeep and preparation of your garden. And, of course, you'll also want to purchase, or borrow, a few books about specific gardening techniques in your area and for the specific crop you'll be growing. You'll find some excellent guides in the Source section of this booklet. LAND How much land do you need to produce cash crops? In part, this will depend upon what you want to do. There are 3 different sizes of land that can be used: (1) less than 1 acre, (2) 1 to 2 acres, (3) 6 to 20 acres. The size of your garden determines what your best crops will be in order to produce the most cash. For example: if you have one acre or less, you won't want to try growing apple and peach trees. You need more space for fruit trees. Instead, focus on crops like asparagus, strawberries, raspberries, herbs and other similar crops that can produce large amounts in small spaces. The other important factor is the type of soil in your area. Most crops require certain kinds of soil to produce the highest yield and the best quality. The good news is that you can improve your soil by using fertilizers. I recommend that you use natural types of fertilizers, such as horse/cow/chicken manure, and limit (or, best of all, eliminate) the amount of chemical fertilizers you use. Most of your customers will prefer "organically grown" produce. Since most "store bought" produce is usually laced with some kind of chemical, featuring organically grown crops can assure you of increased sales. There's always a market for health oriented produce. A great way to improve your soil is by composting. Composting turns leaves, grass clippings, scrap food, and other organic material into a rich soil. There are both long and short procedures for producing compost. Here's how: Pick a spot for a compost pile (4x4 or 6x6 feet) and begin by putting down a 4 to 5 inch layer of leaves or grass clippings. Cover with an inch or so of dirt and a shovelfull or two of manure. Then start another layer of organic matter. Continue in this manner until the pile is 3 or 4 feet high. You can sprinkle each layer lightly with water. If you like, you can construct an enclosed wire "box" for this compost pile. If you want to use the protracted method for composting, simply let the pile "cook" for about 9 months. If you want a "faster" compost wait 8 to 9 days then mix the pile. Then wait 3 or 4 days and mix again. Do this until the pile has turned into a rich soillike mixture. This compost can then be worked into your soil. The purpose of composting is to develop heat and moisture within the pile. This will cause the organic matter to decompose into components that are usable by the plants. It will produce a lot of nitrogenrich material as well as material rich loaded with minerals. You may need to add a cup of lime or bone meal between the layers of the pile to make an even better compost. You should have your soil tested to determine its acid, nitrogen, and mineral condition, or content. You'll then be able to determine what to add to the soil to correct any deficiencies. You'll also be able to determine what grows best in your type of soil. There are low cost soil testing kits available, or you can find local testing groups, such as your local county extension office or the agriculture department at most colleges. Most of the small cash crop growers I've talked with use a rototiller for preparing the soil. If the soil has never been used for a garden, you should have it worked up good with a tractor the first year. After that, a rototiller can do the job. Of course, if you have more than a one acre garden you may still want to save a lot of work and hire someone with a tractor to plow your soil. You should find several full time and part time farmers advertising in the classified section of your local newspaper for their tilling services. The better prepared your soil is, the better the results will be. So take the time to find out the soil's current condition, add plenty of fertilizing material and work the soil up in preparation for planting. Crop selection is largely a matter of preference and how you want to market your product. For example, some products can easily be sold only locally while other products can be sold nationally as well as locally. Herbs are examples of produce that can be sold both ways. I recommend that you don't just plant one type of crop unless you have signed contracts to sell that crop, or have plenty of marketing experience. There are some exceptions to this rule: for example, specialized crops such as mushrooms and bamboo. Planting more than one type of produce will help avoid problems if something doesn't produce as well as expected, or if the market becomes saturated. Using good mulching techniques will help to eliminate weeds and lessen the amount of labor you'll need to put into the garden. It will also keep the soil around your plants moist and produce stronger plants. Almost all successful small cash crop growers use the mulching method. SMALL FRUITS There are tremendous opportunities for part time fruit growers. Every large metropolitan area could use more fruit producers. This section will focus on the basic small fruit crops, such as blueberries, raspberries and strawberries. These fruits generally produce an excellent return on your investment. Much of the demand is for "UPick" fields near larger cities. Thus, a few acres of small fruits can produce a substantial income. Except for strawberries, most of the fruit plants can keep producing for as long as 10 years, or more. Also, small fruit crops produce a high return per acre  up to $15,000 gross income per acre. Blueberries grow on small bushes and require an acid type soil. You can get about 1,000 bushes on an acre. Many farmers argue that blueberries are the best crop for "UPick" operations. But blueberries take a little more care and careful adjustment of the soil acidity, and are a bit harder to grow than other berries. Yet once you have a good established stand of blueberries, they can produce an excellent income. Grapes can be grown almost anywhere there is fertile, well drained soil. Grapevines will last decades (up to 80 years!) and, therefore, can produce a permanent income. Grapes can be used in "UPick" operations, and also sold via retail stores. It's important to study the proper pruning methods for grapes. Further information can be gleaned from U.S. Government agriculture publications found in most libraries or from the U.S. Government Printing Office in Washington, DC. Raspberries can produce quick results and will continue producing for many years. The plants are low cost to purchase and establish, have little disease problems, and usually produce large crops. Best of all, there simply aren't enough of these delicious berries available. Thus, the demand is high and they will bring a large price per quart. You can easily propagate new plants yourself, adding to your crop each year. Raspberries require lots of sun, fertile, well drained soil, and effective mulching. Strawberries are also an extremely popular crop. You can easily sell all you grow either by the "UPick" arrangement or sell direct to the consumer. The cost to establish a strawberry patch is generally low. And yields range from 6,000 to 15,000 pounds per acre. Here are a few tips for "UPick" operations: (1) Have adequate parking, signs, and portable restrooms available. (2) Send each picker into assigned rows. (3) Use reusable containers and sell by the container, instead of by the pound. (4) Have plenty of empty containers to use, and make your customers feel at home. Some growers are also producing other types of lesserknown crops such as kiwi, guavas, and Chinese dates. But, for most people just starting in the "cash crop" business, the 4 small fruits recommended in this section are the most cost effective. FLOWERS There are several different ways to make profits from flowers: selling flower bulbs, cut flowers, and flower plants. These can be sold in a variety of wholesale and retail ways. A sizable flower business can be built upon 1/2 acre or less. Thus, flowers are an excellent choice if you have very little space. Here are a few examples of the most popular types of flowers: (1) Bulbs  canna, crocus, daffodils, gladiolus, iris, lilies, tulips. (2) Cut flowers  carnations, chrysanthemums, roses, snapdragons. (3) Live flowers  roses, violets, wildflowers, and virtually all other types of flowers. Recently, a USDA horticulturist stated that the production of flowers is the fastest growing agriculture business today. The demand far outstrips the supply. A great way to start making money from flowers is by building a greenhouse. You can then grow plants for selling to the many retail outlets that sell flowers in the spring. A number of people have reported that they completely paid for a $7,000  $10,000 greenhouse in just one season using this method. Flowers are always popular and will remain so. If you want to get into this business, you must become knowledgeable. And, more importantly, you must have or develop a love for flowers. HERBS Herb crops can be divided into 3 primary groupings. (There are some herbs that may fit into more than one of the following categories.) (1) Culinary herbs  used for flavorings, or as food. (2) Fragrant herbs  used for scents, potpourris, and sachets. (3) Medicinal  herbs used for as herbal remedies. Herbs are continually becoming more in demand. The demand outstrips the current domestic supply, thus there is plenty of opportunity for growing and selling herbs. It's a pleasant business that costs little to start, takes little space and can produce a substantial income. One of the best things about herbs is that you can produce a fair amount of income per acre. Some growers produce as much as $12,000  $15,000 per acre. Another important fact is that almost all areas of the United States are suitable for growing some type of herbs. Most herb crops can begin producing incomes in the same year they are planted. Therefore, you can plan a herb crop this winter and reap the profits next fall! You can find sources for herb plants and seeds by looking through the various gardening and farming magazines. Publications like, The Mother Earth News, Fine Gardening, Harrowsmith and Organic Gardening contain many ads for herb suppliers. Look in both the classified and display ad sections. Herbs can be sold in a wide variety of ways: (1) Direct to the customer as plants. (2) Direct to the customer as a finished product. (3) Wholesaling to retail stores. (4) Wholesaling to bulk herb buyers. (5) Wholesaling to arts and crafts people who use the herbs in other products. (6) Fresh herbs to restaurants. If you wish to become involved in growing herbs for profit, the first thing to do is to educate yourself about the different herbs. You'll discover that some herbs take special growing conditions to flourish. Then devise a plan to detail what herbs you will grow and how you'll market them. Here are a few examples of some popular herbs from the 3 classes listed earlier. (1) Culinary herbs  Basil, sage, chives, dill, parsley, mints, savory, rosemary, thyme. (2) Fragrant herbs  mints, tansy, clove, rue, thyme, rosemary, chamomile. (3) Medicinal herbs  borage, catnip, ginseng, gold seal, lobelia, pennyroyal, valerian. Most successful herb growers plant a variety of herbs. They also use several different marketing techniques, such as: direct to the consumer, selling herb plants to other growers, and selling to restaurants. Dried herbs can also be sold by mail order. A few herb growers concentrate on one or to varieties for which there is a big demand. Examples include: peppermint and catnip. Usually, they already have contracts for selling the product to large wholesalers or companies that use the herbs in their products. VEGETABLES Fresh, home grown vegetables is a constant indemand product. You can often beat the large supermarket chain on prices, and always on product quality. You can even become a supplier to small grocery stores. But most of your profits will come from direct retail sales to consumers who are looking for "farm fresh, chemical free" produce. There are literally dozens of different vegetable crops you can grow. I recommend that you pick 8 or 10 of the most popular vegetables. Using intensive gardening techniques can greatly increase the amount produced per acre. Some growers have reported incomes of up to $20,000 per acre! These are a few of the most popular vegetables: Asparagus  yields up to 2,000 pounds per acre at $2 per pound. Plants are started as roots and are ready to use in about 3 years. And will continue producing for up to 20 years. Beans  always one of the most popular crops, and come in many easytogrow varieties. Beans will produce several crops each growing season. Brussels Sprouts  relatively easy to grow and can produce late into the year, even after a frost. Carrots  requires lots of loose fertile soil. There is a strong demand for "baby carrots." Corn  one of the most popular fresh picked vegetables, although it does have a slightly lower profitability per acre. Lettuce  a quick and easytogrow vegetable. You should grow several different varieties, and it can be planted very early. Peppers  both the mild and hot varieties. Peppers need a long warm growing season and well drained soil. Other popular items include okra, onions, peas, radishes, spinach, squash, tomatoes, watermelon, and egg plant. Vegetables can be marketed in a variety of ways. There are even many "UPick" vegetable operations. However, by far the best way to sell vegetables is by operating a small roadside stand, or at an established farmer's market. Most communities have a farmer's market operating on weekends. There's a booming market for organically grown vegetables. And that market will continue. Chemical free produce will always bring you premium prices. Organically grown vegetables take a little more soil preparation and effort, but they can be well worth the extra effort. Other ways to market vegetables are: directly to restaurants, local stores, and to food coops. The key to all of these marketing efforts is to have a high quality, chemical free products. SPECIALITY CROPS This section will briefly cover other special cash crops. Some of these crops can only be grown in certain section of the countries. Also, some must have special growing conditions. LANDSCAPING PLANTS  Special plants for landscaping are always in demand. These plants include shrubs such as: rhododendron, azaleas and juniper, as well as some decorative trees. Landscaping plants can be sold directly to the consumer or to landscaping companies. If you begin supplying a landscape company or retail outlets with good stock, you'll soon have a steady source of income. A couple of important things to know about landscape plants are that they must be attractive and have a good survival rate. And you probably need to give some sort of guarantee that the plants are free from disease. NUT CROPS  Including almonds, chestnuts, filberts, pecans and walnuts. You can expect a wait of from 3 to 20 years for nut production. But some growers also produce and sell various aged nut trees for replanting. Nice two and three old trees will bring a premium price. Since nut tree crops require a long time to mature, some growers use a dual method ... they plant a raspberry crop between the nut trees. It takes about 8 to 10 years to get nut trees into nut production. But, after they have produced crops, they can also be used for valuable lumber production in 30 years or so. Nut trees could make an excellent retirement crop if you plant them while you're young. Some arrowstraight walnut trees, black walnut specifically, have brought as much as $10,000 each! BAMBOO  This crop is grown for its edible shoots, and can produce 3 to 10 tons per acre. Bamboo is also used for a wide variety of construction items, including furniture. Currently, U.S. growers cannot keep up with the demand, so bamboo is being imported from Asia. DRIED PLANTS  Are used for decoration and fragrance. Dried floral arrangements are especially popular. Many arts and craft shops, gift stores and speciality shops need a constant supply of dried flowers. There are two steps involved in producing these crops. First you must produce an attractive, quality plant. Next, you must use the proper drying techniques to preserve the plants while maintaining its looks. MUSHROOMS  Have become a very popular speciality food in fancy restaurants. The Shitake mushroom is specially adapted for production by small family farms. It can be harvested during the spring and fall. And it has both a meaty taste and medicinal properties. These mushrooms are usually grown outdoors on 6 to 8 foot logs. The logs are prepared and then inoculated with the mushroom spores. Then it's a 6 to 8 month wait for the first crop. Recently, a few growers have developed indoor growing techniques which result in a shorter growing season. OYSTER MUSHROOMS  Is another variety that is fast becoming popular. These mushrooms are fast growing and produce high yields. They can be grown on easily available material, such as wheat straw. The largest market for speciality mushrooms are restaurants, food coops, grocers and health food stores. You can enjoy a year round booming market for dried Shitake mushrooms. SEEDS  Many small growers are supplying the large seed companies with special crop seed. These include flower seeds, wildflowers seeds and hardtofind vegetables. Some small producers occasionally sell directly to the consumer. SPROUTS  Growing sprouts can be ideal for those who have very little space. Fresh sprouts can be supplied to major grocery stores as well as to restaurants and health food stores. MARKETING TECHNIQUES There are a variety of selling techniques that can be used get cash from your crops. Some producers use several of the methods at the same time. Several things can help make your marketing efforts easier. The first is quality. You want to produce the best product possible. Your product's good, clean, healthy appearance will impress buyers. Subpar products will be hard to sell. The way to produce quality is by proper initial soil preparation, using good seeds and by adhering to accepted growing methods. You should read books about gardening and carefully study any special growing requirements for each vegetable or fruit. Books covering most all special plants and produce are available at your library or from the U.S. Government Printing Office in Washington DC. Also, you'll want to take steps to eliminate pests that injure your plants. There many plants that act as natural repellents to some insect pests. For example: basil, catnip, marigolds, nasturtiums, savory, garlic, horseradish, tansy, and thyme. An important marketing consideration is timing. If you can get a crop ready when other producers aren't, sales will be easy. This can be done by using greenhouses, planting early, using hotbeds and, of course, good planning. Pricing is also important. Most sellers recommend that you price your products 10% to 20% below those in grocery stores. (But don't lock yourself into a price war by trying to undercut your competition from other small producers.) Products that are grown using organic methods will most often bring higher prices. Check will all the local retail stores and at farmers markets to get a feel for your local current selling rates. One of the most common marketing techniques is selling your wares at roadside stands. Two of the most important factors to consider before setting up your stand are signs and ample parking space. Your signs should be no longer than 6 to 8 words, neat, legible and easy to understand. Signs need to be placed far enough ahead of your stand to give the customer time to pull into your parking area. Next, you want your stand to be well organized and neat in appearance. Make it easy for the customer to see the product and prices. Neatness and cleanliness will pay off. Combined with quality products and good prices, you'll enjoy a lot of free advertising by "word of mouth." A variation of the roadside stand is to sell from the back of your pickup truck or car. You'll need to locate a well traveled road and a spot with parking that doesn't interfere with anyone. Of course, all of the previously mentioned factors apply. Another common selling method is at farmer's markets and flea markets. These gatherings are held in most localities. If not, you'll want to get together with other producers and organize a farmer's market. All of these methods can also be aided by advertising in local newspapers, "penny saver" papers, radio stations, and by posting notices on bulletin boards. Selling directly to retail grocery stores and restaurants is another good procedure. If you can provide them with a steady supply of fresh produce, sales should be easy. When contacting these stores be prepared to offer a 30% to 40% discount from regular retail prices. This allows the retailer a good profit margin. If you are a reliable producer, you may be able to set up a weekly route to service several retail locations. There are many food coops that are eager to buy large quantities of quality produce. You'll need to offer reasonable discounts. Too, you'll want to scout out these local coops and contact them directly. For some products you may have to prepare neat individualized packages of produce. Example: 1 or 2 ounces of herbs in labeled, plastic bags. UPick operations have been discussed previously. This marketing method will work for almost any product. However, it does present some special problems. Example: you cannot let very young kids into the picking areas as they may get hurt and/or damage some crops. In order to operate a successful UPick operation, you'll need to get along well with people. You also need to be friendly, courteous and treat everyone as if they are individually important which, of course, they are. GETTING HELP There's a variety of ways to get help with gardening and marketing your products. Almost every state offers free agriculture help through universities and state agriculture offices. The U.S. Department of Agriculture also offers many free programs. Local bookstores, newsstands, and libraries also contain many informative sources. Study these diligently and become skillful in gardening. Finally, you'll be able to find many newsletters and growers associations advertised in the gardening magazines. These are often your best sources for plants, seeds, growing techniques, and marketing strategies. SUCCESS ANALYSIS Eight contributing factors are measured on a 1 to 10 basis (with 10 being excellent) based on analysis of this opportunity. 1. Time Investment 8 2. Startup Costs 8 3. Gross Income Potential 8 4. New Income Potential 9 5. Income in Relation to Investment 9 6. Stability 7 7. Overall Risk 9 8. Potential for Growth 9 Overall Potential for Success: 8.38 CONCLUSION This is basically a labor intensive business, relying on your learned skills and work. Preparing the soil, planting, nurturing, harvesting and marketing are all details to which you must attend to on a continuous basis. Starting a backyard cash crop operation can be very, very rewarding. Plus, you'll not only get closer to nature while learning a valuable ageold skill, but you'll be producing a valuable, healthy product. "Cash Crops" is an enjoyable business you can start with little money, nearly risk free. It can also give you wonderful personal satisfaction and, quite possibly, help to improve your health by working in the outdoors. HOW TO START YOUR OWN HIGHLY PROFITABLE RESUME WRITING SERVICE Here's a business you can start for virtually nothing, and parlay into a million dollar enterprise in five years or less. Many established resume writing services in the large metropolitan areas are reporting annual incomes of $250,000 or more. Even the smaller operations, in towns as small as 15,000 are experiencing sales of $50,000 or more. No special knowledge, education or experience are required for total success in this business. An awareness of the general format of the "modern resume," and the ability to keep material are about the only prerequisites to successfully operate a resume writing service. Probably the most exciting and motivational aspects of this business idea are the low investment and risk factors involved, and the growing demand for resume service. Up until the past couple of years, few in any Americans really had to look for jobs. People in general have either forgotten how to look for a new job, or never knew how in the first place. Since the start of the World War II, back in 1941, the American worker has been spoiled by an affluent society and an ideal market for the job seeker. Usually, all he had to do whenever he lost a job or wanted to change jobs was to report in to local branch of his local employment service office, check in at his union office, look at the want ads in the Sunday paper, or call a few friends and ask about job openings. But no more! Times have changed! There are fewer jobs and an increasing number of people applying for those jobs that are available. Just recently, the post office department in a large west coast city advertised that applications would be accepted on two days only, 600 up coming openings. Would you believe that twenty thousand applicants showed up to fill out applications? Can you image the post office personnel people reviewing all those applications, and then interviewing all those people, according to the fair employment practices act? On another day, word got out that there was going to be an opening for a fork lift driver at a local warehouse. Fifteen hundred men and women showed up even before the job was advertised! Times are tough, and we're moving deeper into the age of specialization. Employers are demanding to know more about the applicanthis work record, natural talents and personality traits. They want the cold facts on the application form. Personnel managers are placing a higher premium on their time, and delegating to others the job of "weeding out" the unqualified applicants from those whose backgrounds and goals come closest to fitting the needs of the company. To get in to see the person doing the hiring nowadays, the job applicant has to "sell the shortstopper," and that calls for a professionally written resume. More and more firms are demanding resumes. Industry estimates are that by the year 2000, most of the jobs worth having will require a written resume before even an initial interview is granted. And that's where you can fit into the picture your Professional Resume Writing Service. Probably 80 percent of the people searching for jobs don't have a resume. Of the 20 percent who do have resumes, many are ineffective; they simply do adequately present the applicant's total qualifications. Everyonewith or without a resumeis looking for this key: A professionally written resume, a sales presentation of their qualifications and experience that will get the job for themthe job they want. The job hunters are wound up in their own specialties and problems. They don't know how, and they don't have the timeAND they're willing to pay you to put it all together for them. Just as you're willing to pay a doctor, dentist or investment broker, those who need a resume are willing to pay you for this service. The market exists in every city and town in this country, and the demand for this service is growing daily. Your opportunity for success beyond your fondest dreams has been greater! The brass ring is here! Grab it, and hold on! You'll need a modern, professional quality typewriter. You can begin, and perhaps get by for a month or so, with a top quality portable, but do yourself and your business a favor: Arrange to rent, lease or buy monthly payments if necessary, the best machine for the quality of work that will command top dollars for you. Setting up and operating from your home will be the most economical way to begin. In addition to your typewriter, you should have a typewriter stand, typist chair, adjustable longarm lamp, and a file cabinet. However, just as you can make do with a portable typewriter for a month or so, you can get by for starters with a kitchen table at your dining room table. To prepare yourself properly, invest in a good book on how to write "job winning" resumes. Select a book which discusses both the cover letter and format of the body of the resume. The most important part of any resume package is the cover letter the applicant sends as part of the resume. This letter states the specific job the applicant is applying for, explains why he believes he is qualified, and pointedly asks for an interview. In most cases, you'll be able to provide an "all purpose form letter" which your client can adapt to any position that interest him. More later about actual writing of the resume and the cover letter. The format and style of the body of the resume are the items you want to learn from this book. Resumes of today generally follow this outline: 1. Name 2. Address 3. City, State, zip 4. Phone number 5. Type of job or position wanted 6. Goals and/or desires in life. 7. Job history, starting with current or last job held 8. Special courses, education or training completed 9. Military History 10. Formal Education 11. Activities while attending school: athletics, offices, awards 12. Hobbies and special interest 13. Notation that names business and personal references will be furnished on request. 14 Availability 15. Health Once you've organized with space and equipment, you're ready for business. All that's necessary from this point on will be advertising, client interviewing, and producing the final product. Your advertising needs, in comparison with many other businesses, need not cost you an exorbitant amount of money. It should, however, be consistent and eyecatching. You should contact your area's widely read newspaper and arrange to run a onecolumn by one inch ad every day for the next six months to twelve months. By purchasing your ad space on a daily insertion basis, and over at least six month period, your rate will be much lower than the rate charged for shorter contracts. Your newspaper ad might read something like this: A complete, Professional Service MIDWEST RESUME SERVICE ResumesLettersPortfolios ...that results in jobs! Phone 1234567 Aside from an ad in the newspaper, and perhaps a similar one in your area shoppers' papers, the only other advertising efforts you should worry about are those that don't cost moneyfree bulletin board announcements, radio and television talk show interviews, and low cost flyers, circulars or brochures that describe your services. One method of gaining business exposure which is most often overlooked is the radio and television talk show interview. Call the broadcast stations in your area and get the names of the producers of these talk shows. Then write them a letter explaining your services, and how you believe an appearance on their program could be educational and beneficial to their audiences. Include a brochure with your letter, give them a call on the phone, and ask them to consider an interview with you. Another area to explore for free publicity is a guest speaker for your civic clubs. For these, simply write out a speech emphasizing the need for a resume and the proper way to write one that will result in a job for the job seeker. Explain the growing trend of employers to use the resume as a screening device, and the fact that a well written resume can get a better job for someone when there are seemingly no openings. Don't be afraid to explain what goes into a professionally written resume. Many of the people listening to youif you sell them they don't have the time or knowhow, and because you'll have the reputation of an "expert" after having spoken before their club. Basically, people are lazy in this respect, and would rather pay someone else to do something than to take the time to learn how and do it themselves. Once you spread the word that you're in the business of preparing resumes for people looking for work or wanting better jobs, you'll have no trouble at all keeping busy! Your brochure can be as simple as a Zfolded 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of paper. It should describe your services, emphasize your professionalism, fast service and reasonable cost. It would be best to have your story typeset and laid out in three columns down the width of the paper. Most quick print shops can handle all this for you, at a nominal cost. Once you've had your brochures printed, leave off a supply with your area high school and college counselors, vocational and trade school placement directors, and with as many private employment agencies as will take them. When a prospective clients call you, simply explain your services and prices, and set up an appointment for them to meet with you. For this it's best to prepare a script, which might read like this: YOU, answering the phone : Good morning! Midwest Resume Service. May I help you? CLIENT: Yes, I'm calling about your ad in the paper. YOU: Oh yes, and thank you for calling. Let me explain our services. We're professional resume writerswe interview job seekers such as yourselflearn the important features of their backgrounds as those features apply in helping us to write a resume that will land them the job they're looking for. Then we assemble all this information into a winning presentation, type it out, give you the original plus 50 copies and a cover letter (which you can modify as necessary on your home typewriter and have copied each time you submit a resume). Your cost is only $50, and usually we can have everything ready for you within three or four days. Now, does that sound like what you had in mind? CLIENT: Yes! That's just what I had in mind. When can we get together and start the ball rolling? YOU: How about this afternoon at 3:15 or would tomorrow morning at say 9:45 be better for you? We're located at 600 North Main Street. Are you familiar with the area? CLIENT: Yes, I know the area, no problem. This afternoon at 3:15 will be fine. YOU: Good! Now, let me have your name and phone number please. CLIENT: Gives his name and phone number. YOU: All right, Bob, we'll look forward to seeing you this afternoon at 3:15. You now have a client, and an appointment to interview him for background information in order to put together a resume that can result in a job for him. Be sure you're prepared with a "researcher's questionnaire," to guide you in the questions to ask. Type your resume format on a separate sheet paper, numbering each question you want an answer to, or subject you want to cover. This of course serves as a "master" which you duplicate and use as the researcher's questionnaire guide. For each interview, take one of these "interview guides" and an ordinary yellow legal tablet, and start asking questions. Identify each page of notes with a number or subject matter from the resume format, and use a separate page of the tablet for each subject and each job the client may have had. The interview should be relaxed, with the client doing most of the talking. However, you should control the interview and take notes as the client gives you the information you need. Be confident, but friendly. Maintain your confidence and ask leading questions that elicit complete, revealing responses. Take your time, and "listen" to what the client ISN'T telling you as well as what he IS telling you. With a bit of practice, you'll be able to find out all there is to know about your client in twenty minutes or less. Look ahead to the day when you have employees working for you. Develop your interviewing techniques to a state of maximum efficiency for your business, and then record three or four interviews for use in training your employees. You should also reproduce several examples of completed resumes and put them into an instruction book for study by new employees. After the interview, you need to interpret your notes and type the information into a resume. This would be easy because you've gathered the details in sequence with your resume format. Familiarity with format writing style makes the task of putting everything into finished form quite simple. At the very least, a quick course in resume writing will be necessary. Check out a book on the subject from your local library. The important thing to remember is to drop the "I's" and write in a kind of note taking reportorial style: "Hired as entry level shipping clerk. Recognized need for organization on the loading dock to eliminate congestion. Suggested designated spaces for incoming and outgoing shipments. This program was adopted and immediately eliminated congestion of trucks and decreased overtime requirements, with an estimated savings of $700 per week for the company. Promoted to Line Expeditor after six months.." Don't put a time limit on the amount of time you devote to each client, but once you're organized and established, the interview through the finished resume shouldn't take more than an hour or two. After you have the resume typed, call the client in to check it over and approve it. In almost every case, he'll be very favorably impressed and ready to go with anything you suggest. The secret is in the quality of your worka modern typewriter with good type, clean paper and error free copy. So, you explain to your client that his resume will make more favorable impression on the prospective employer when it is printed on better quality paper. Suggest to him that you have it printed for him on colored "offset" paper instead of ordinary bond. Ivory, tan or blue shades are desirable. For the really expensivelooking resume, suggest that it be printed on 11x17 paper, and then folded in half to make a kind of "book" about the client. The charges for your service should be about $50 for the interview, original resume, 50 copies on white bond paper, and an universal cover letter. For colored offset paper, or 11x17 sized sheets, check current rent prices at your print shop. You should pass those costs onto your client, plus a nominal service charge of $5 or so. Also explain to your client that you can up date or add to his resume whenever the need arises, and for this service you charge $10, plus the cost of printing as many copies as he requires. Now for the cover letterprobably the most important part of any resume submitted for job consideration. The first thing to ask your client regarding the cover letter is if he intends to submit his resumes in answer to advertised positions, or if he intends to "shotgun" them out to possible employers. According to his stated plan, you simply use one of the two general forms for cover letters. And that's itthe basics you need for starting your own highly profitable resume service. A couple of things always to bear in mind: Your success will be directly related to the quality of the finished product you put out. Learn to do it right, and then strive for perfection with every job you complete for a client. Remember too that image you project is the credibility rating you'll carry with your customers. Shabby surroundings, a disorganized office and an less than personal appearance will doom you to failure. Be impressive! keep your eyes open, and move into an office among professional people as soon as you can. Finally, put some real planning into starting your business; get it well established and running smoothly; then hire other people to do some of the work. The object of a business of your own is not steady employment for you, but financial security and independenceto achieve and enjoy the fruits of your labor. Plan your business, nurture its growth and then hire people to do the work while you guide, supervise and make bank deposits. COVER LETTER IN RESPONSE TO AN ADVERTISED OPENING Your recent ad, expressing a need for an experienced stock clerk, has come to my attention. I'd like very mush to get together with you at your earliest convenience to discuss my qualifications for this position. With hopes for such a meeting in mind, I'm enclosing a copy of my resume for your information and consideration. I assure you that I am experienced, learn very quickly, and am adaptable to new methods of operation. I have heard favorable comments about your company as the place for one with ambitions for growth and selfimprovement. I'm available to come in and meet with you at your convenience and can begin work immediately. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration. A call from you will be most welcome and appreciated. Sincerely Yours, Your signature Your Typed Name (123) 4567890 COVER LETTER FOR THE SHOTGUN APPROACH WHERE NO KNOWN OPENING EXISTS AS a salesman, I have ambitions to improve my status in life. Your company's reputation as a leader in the publishing of educational materials impresses me, and i would like to explore the possibilities of becoming a part of your sales force. I'm currently a topproducing salesman, but feel stymied with my present employment. I think I could do much better with a company receptive to innovative ideas and energetic people such as myself. Could we get together and discuss the possibilities of my joining your organization in some capacity that would utilize my abilities to a greater extent, and at the same time benefit your company? I will be free from 10 o'clock on, next Tuesday, the 27th. Please give me a call at (123) 4567890. Thank You! I am looking forward to meeting you. Your signature Your Typed name PS: enclosed is a resume that will give you an in depth look at my accomplishments, and an idea on my potential. I appreciate your time and consideration. HOW TO START YOUR OWN MOBILE LOCKSMITHING SERVICE The locks on the doors on most homes keep the skilled burglar out for about 30 seconds! This is especially true if the only thing slowing him down is a standard keyintheknob lock. Statistically, there's about one residential burglary every 30 seconds in this country. Traditionally, as the economy falters and times get harder, the number tends to rise. Quite naturally, people are concerned and frightened. As a result, locksmithing is not only one of the new "demand" businesses, it's rapidly becoming one of the more profitable businesses for entrepreneurs with not too much capital to invest. Today's locksmiths are usually well versed in mathematics and basic electronics. They almost always have to be, what with the new types of locks being introduced. Today's locksmith is more likely to be known as a "Security Specialists," then just ordinary locksmith, as in the past. Even so, most locksmithing businesses are still oneman operations. In many instances, it's a husband and wife family affair, with the husband handling the mechanical end and the wife doing the books and financial end of the business. Most of these small operations concentrate on the repair side of the business, and deliberately choose to remain small in size. As we will discuss later, however, this need not be the case; these small businesses CAN "grow up." According to the area in which he is located, and established, well organized and trained locksmith may gross between $50,000 and $60,000 per year, using a van as a mobile "workshop," and space in his home as an office. Remember: As the economy turns toward recession, burglaries increase and people become aware of the need for better locks to protect what they own; thus the locksmith enjoys an increased income during hard times. Just because locksmithing is a "personal" kind of business, and can be started on a shoestring and operated out of the home, that's not to say that a locksmithing service cannot be developed into a million dollar business. On the contrary, there are a number of operations in some of the larger metropolitan areas that have several mobile locksmith vans on the road, in addition to retail store locations. These operations are grossing well into the million dollar figures every year. It's a matter of desire, determination and personal fulfillment and satisfaction. Attitude, marketing skills and general business knowledge are also positive attributes necessary for real success. Very definitely, the sharp businessman with determined ambition can dominate any market with a modern locksmithing service. The key ingredient to this business is the utilization of proper marketing and selling skills. It goes without saying: you can know all there is about the mechanical functioning of the business, but without innovative marketing and selling skills, your business will surely flounder. However, given the marketing knowhow, plus persistent sales efforts, you can succeed in this business with the knowledge you can acquire of the technical side. The success of any business is built upon the marketing and sales expertise of its founder, because after all, "mechanics" can always be hired, if you decide to go that route rather than learn the trade and the business. Your marketing efforts should stress the theme that your services will allay the fears of your buyers. You want to get across to your prospective customers the sense of security your service will provide: You can make them safe in their own homes; no longer will they have to worry about being rudely awakened in the middle of the night by a burglar rustling around in their house; no longer will they have to worry about coming home to a house that's been cleaned out or ransacked. Once you understand that fear is a basic human instinct, it's easy to see that virtually everyone can be a prospect for your service as a locksmith. Your potential market includes everyone in your area, because everyone has possessions. So every homeowner, every apartment dweller, every business owner, all the schools, churches, government institutions, and a wide variety of other commercial and industrial accounts can be yours. In this day and age, new homeowners and apartment dwellers want locks changed the day the move in, so that the former occupants and other key holders will not have access to their place. In addition, there will probably be the need for additional keys for each member of the new family, now that new, safer locks have been installed. Commercial and industrial accounts present and even lucrative market. larger companies tend to want their keys "departmentalized," so that office workers can get into the building on weekends, but not into the factory or shipping areas, and vice versa. Banks and savings institutions frequently need the safe deposit locks changed. Generally speaking, newcomers to this field should focus their efforts on the commercial market is vast, and often up for grabs in many areas. In addition, the profit margins in these areas are excellent! With one of these accounts you'll have to work paying about $500 or more per visit, compared with $25 to $50 per visit per residential job. With commercial/industrial accounts, there's also the possibility of ongoing service and maintenance. Definitely, the commercial/industrial business is well worth going after, and can put your business in the black very rapidly. However, it does take aggressiveness, and the determination to sell these accounts. Start small, Consider working out of your home in the beginning. Most of today's successful locksmiths began by working out of their homes, with the family car or van outfitted with the tools and equipment needed. Such an approach will enable you to get started for a little as $1,000. You should be aware however, that this is just a beginning, and not all it's going to take to really establish your business. With this level of investment, you're more or less limited in the business you can handle and the money you can make. Locksmiths who want to make the really big money should be investing all their early profits into more equipment and inventory up to a level where they can offer complete full service locksmithing. Such a business would require at least $5,000 in equipment, perhaps even $10,000, depending on how many different services you want to offer. this estimate for startup costs does not include your van or inventory of spare parts and new locks. Perhaps a quick word of caution is in order here. You've no doubt seen or heard some of the advertisements promising all kinds of big money to be made with your own locksmithing service; "just send for the learnathome correspondence course, and you'll be home free." It's true that you can earn big money in this business, but as we've noted earlier, without a lot of sharp marketing and selling expertise, plus at least the essential equipment to handle the kind of work these courses teach, enrolling in one of these courses will put you no further ahead than you are right now. This business requires EQUIPMENT and KNOWLEDGE. You can make excellent money as a locksmith, so long as you operate your business capably and in a professional manner. But without a full line of the equipment required to handle a wide variety of jobs, you will be limiting your total income potential. The more you invest in quality equipment, the more different kinds of jobs you can handle, and thus the more money you'll be capable of making. This is definitely a business in which you decide for yourself exactly how far and how fast you want to go. As we've said, some operators are perfectly content to work out of their homes, using a mobile van. They don't want the larger problems involved in hiring employees, or the expense of maintaining a retail location. But to make really big money in this business, starting small and working out of your home, you should plan to put more mobile trucks on the road, and as soon as possible, open a retail location. Each mobile van will give you another satellite business, and a retail location will afford you a base headquarters for your mobile vans. It is of the utmost importance that you build and maintain a professional image as a quality locksmithing operation from the start. Clinging to the craftsman type of image will be of advantage only if you wish to stay in the "Mom and Pop" category. You should endeavor to handle all jobs as quickly and as efficiently as possible. Outfitting yourself and your help in sharp looking uniforms will help. Making your calls in a clean, wellorganized van will also play an important part in the image your customers have of your business. You want your customers to have confidence in your business, and in the quality of the work you do for them. When they do, you'll find they are more likely to pay their bills with fewer reminders. Think of it like this: A large invoice presented by a man in a clean uniform who drives up in a good looking truck and does quality work is going to be paid more readily than one for $25 presented by a guy in grubby jeans who drove up in a 10year old decrepit truck. With so many technological changes occurring within this field on an almost monthly basis, it's to your advantage to stay on top of what's happening within the locksmithing field. This means subscribing to some of the better trade publications. You should be attending the various Locksmithing Association promoted seminars and workshops that offer ongoing help in both the technical and financial side of this business. In other words, you should plan to keep yourself up to date with a program of continuous learning. There are several ways to get started in this business. You can buy an existing operation from a retiring craftsman. Ask him to help you with the technical side of the operation while you spend most of your time actively promoting and managing the business. Or, you can hire the technical help you need, and the sales force to build the business while you do the managing. You can enroll in one of the popular correspondence courses, become involved in the business as you learn from the various trade publications, and progress at your own speed. Our recommendation is that you learn the fiscal and management side of the business, and hire others to handle the mechanical or technical side. Thus the purpose of this report is to indoctrinate you to the business side. To explain the technical details of this business would take volumes and probably much of the information contained would be outdated by the time it came to press. However, we will provide you with an outline of the most common types of jobs a locksmith should be able to handle. RECOMBINATION LOCKS: A customer may want to change an existing lock to work off a new keythe most common type of lock being the keyintheknob cylinder or pin tumbler lock. When the proper key is inserted in the keyway, springloaded pins are pushed up and out of the cylinder, allowing the plug to turn, and opening the lock. When recombinating, you're changing the depth of these pins so that a new key is the only one that will work. Most house, auto and padlocks are the pin tumbler variety. Different brands of locks use different depths, space and keyways. But with a given brand of lock, up to 50,000 variations exist. Thus, it's not always necessary to change the new lock. COMBINATING ALIKE: Some customers will have a house or business with several different locks and keys, none of them alike or using the same key. Sometimes people will want to change to a system that will require the least number of keys to carry around. Here, you'll be required to change the key coding so that one key works all the locks. Sometimes this requires the installation of common door hardware; however, in most cases, you'll find the same brand locks are used throughout the building. MASTERKEYING: Apartment owners and other commercial accounts may want dual key access. This is done by using locks with dual pin tumbler sets. One works with the apartment key, the other with the master key. Keys are spoken of in terms of code numbers. These are sets of digits reflecting the depth of serration. A given lock is a master key setup might respond, for example, to keys with code numbers 12345 and 6789. Mathematical progressions are used in master keying. LOCKOUTS: Frequently a person finds himself locked out of his home, office, warehouse, car, etc. Invariably this happens at odd hours of the day or night. So opening locks at odd hours of the day or night will be a role you'll definitely play live of your customers. A typical pin tumbler lock can generally be picked open in about 30 seconds, using either picks or a single piece of spring steel and good wrist work. All locks have tolerances and variations in manufacture which will allow you to push the cylinder pins up and out of the way while exerting a turning pressure on the cylinder itself. AUTOMOBILE LOCKOUTS: This problem occurs frequently and will require a different procedure. A tool called a "Slim Shim" is often used here, and works on most domestic and many foreign cars. this is pushed down between the glass and the weather stripping on the door far enough to reach the back of the lock cylinder on the door. You simply push down or pull up. A "button popper" is also used, worked through the weather stripping on vent windows in older cars, and angled back to the latch button. LOCK INSTALLATION: Much of your time will be spent installing new lock and door hardware. In many cases, homeowners and business people will want to upgrade their security with the latest model hardware for older homes, offices and other buildings. Many locksmiths get involved in new construction of apartment houses, condominiums, shopping lefts and the like. Often you'll be adding more security to an existing door, such as installing a deadbolt lock. PANIC BARS AND DOOR CLOSERS: Many locksmiths working the commercial or industrial market get involved in the repair and installation of panic bars in public access areas. Panic bars are those large bars you can push on to open the outside doors of many public buildings. Door closers are those hydraulic devices mounted at the top of these doors which return the door to the closed position after it has been opened. ALARMS, SAFES, AND VAULTS: The sale and installation of alarm are a natural adjunct to the locksmithing business. Many larger locksmithing operations move into this area, which is somewhat specialized. Alarms can be the "perimeter" type which sound when a door is opened after hours, or "area" alarms. "Space" or "area" protection is generally preferred, and involves infrared, ultrasonic or microwave sensors triggering alarms by detecting movement. Safe and vault work is another specialty. Some locksmiths have major banks and savings and loan associations as clients. They spend a good deal of their time changing safe deposit box locks and maintaining vaults and the like. Gaining in popularity is the safe and service of safes for homes and business use. You will be exposed to all these specialties and to new technology at seminars, conventions and workshops. HIGH SECURITY WORK: A typical locksmith is a "general practitioner," while the highsecurity locksmith is a "specialist." High security work is often done for major corporations, government institutions, large banks, race tracks, museums and wealthy private individuals who desire maximum security. Often this work involves access control systems using card readers or voice print equipment, possibly combines with electronic push button locks that work off a combination of numbers known only to a few individuals. In addition to these major areas of activity, locksmiths the world over do key duplicating and impressioning, which is replacing of lost keys with custom made copies, and a wide variety of other types of sales, repair and service work. In order to achieve maximum profitability as a locksmith, you must be able to offer all these services to your customers. Locks and security are the prime concern to your customer, and it follows that when a customer wants help in this area, he wants it taken care of immediately. Thus, you must position yourself to handle this job immediately, or lose him to a locksmith who can take care of his needs on the spot. Do some market research. Analyze your local market area before you embark upon this business. This can be done via letters to the local locksmithing association, Chamber of Commerce, or even by checking through the yellow pages. As important as anything else, you'll want to know how many locksmiths are already operating in your area, and how much of the market you can expect to attract with your business. Most industry experts agree that any more than one locksmith for every 30,000 people tends to saturate the market. However, you should study the operations of the existing locksmiths to determine if you can capture a good portion of the existing market by offering more and better service, especially with wellplanned efforts towards the commercial and industrial accounts. In many areas, the established locksmiths have been in business for 20 years or more, and are not interested in expanding their businesses to include the newer and more intricate types of protection available. Look your market over. Determine if there's been any real effort to "sell" the market on upgraded protection. Doortodoor sales efforts; direct mail advertising campaigns; local "hard sell" newspaper advertising; home protection and business security seminars, are angles that can be used to launch your business. These approaches should prove to be especially profitable if the existing locksmiths have been sitting back and letting the people come to them when they have a problem. Get to know the building contractors and start bidding on the installation of locks on their building projects. You will get your share of business, even though at first you may get contracts only from the new builders who have not had experience with the other locksmiths. For a fast start in this business, we suggest that you set yourself up with a van and take your business to your customers. It isn't absolutely necessary to buy a van off the showroom floor and outfit it with all the equipment you'll ultimately need for a full service locksmithing business. That would be nice, but it would probably run you close to $50,000 or more. By shopping around, you should be able to pick up a good, late model van for about $3,000. You might be able to work an even better deal by leasing a new van, and writing off the payments as a business tax deduction. One thing you'll definitely want to consider is a van that has a raised roof in order for you to stand upright in it. After all, you'll be doing most of your work in it, and to have to stoop all the time would soon become quite tiring. Generally, you can run a workbench down either or both sides of your van. COPY SUCCESS! Don't be ashamed to be a "Copycat". Most everything that is worthwhile today is an approximate copy of something that came before it. Examine the sales materials of your competitors and notice what is selling for them, then copy it. There is nothing illegal about this. If something is selling for the other guy, then that same "something" should sell just as well for you, all other factors being equal. However you must recognize that when too may people try to sell the same product, using the same advertising tactics, etc., a vicious competitive circle often develops. Therefore you should vary your programs just enough so that you are not locked into such a situation. When you examine the program or product of your competitor, pay particular attention to any weaknesses, then when you "copy" it you can make yours superior. What your are really doing is copying a successful idea and making your product or service better than the original put out by your competitor. Since most people will not necessarily switch from one product to another unless they have a good reason, such as price or quality, they will purchase your product only when they think it is better priced or is superior. By making a small change in the right direction in your "Copy" you can capture the market. So remember both sides of the "Copycat" equation... find out what others are selling successfully and how they are accomplishing it, then be slightly different in compiling and selling your own products or programs. If you can convince people that you are the exclusive source for a particular product or piece of information, they will be looking toward you, not your competitor. RICHES THROUGH CREATIVE THINKING! When solving problems after you have exhausted the normal means of coming up with the solution, think in terms of unorthodox methods. Vary your thinking and try to solve the problems by creating something completely new and irrelevant. Come into the problem through the "back door". Research and curiosity go hand in hand in solving the toughest problems. Quite often the answer is so simple, it is not obvious to us. Use an organized plan to work with and record the results logically so you will have a format to follow and a basis for review as you proceed to create something new or solve an "unsolvable" problem. Creating new programs or products by association is another method of thinking. You first think of an object which is similar or adjacent to the subject item, then continue the "chain" of associated thoughts until new and useful programs or products emerge as ideas. Relate these ideas to the subject item by trial and error or by analysis of all the variables involved. Plain old fashioned "daydreaming" is another method of creative thinking. Make up a fantastic story in your mind and try to visualize (dream) your way to a successful conclusion based on what results you are trying to achieve. Consider all the alternatives to what you're trying to come up with. Gather together and analyze all the data you can find about the subject. If you get into a rut, leave it lie. Go to some other aspect of the puzzle. come back to it later. Quite often as you progress it will suddenly appear, bright and clear. When it does, write it all down so you won't lose it as your mind drifts to the next step. Complete one step at a time. By breaking it down to size you can solve it in segments. Don't try to override your mistakes. Recognize them and bury them so they will help, not hinder, your progress toward your creative goal. Don't further confuse the issue by doing so much study and research that there are too many roads to take. START A PETSITTING SERVICE TURN YOUR LOVE OF ANIMALS INTO A PROFITABLE NEW VENTURE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Flexible hours, Promising salary.Holidays negotiable. Be your own boss. No experience necessary. If you spotted the above ad in the Help Wanted section of your local newspaper would you laugh, "Too good to be true"? But it is true! Have you always said, "I'd never have the money or the skill to start my own business." But you do! One of the easiest businesses to start and operate requires very little money. The only necessary skills are patience, time, and lots of love. The business? Petsitting! Jackie McDonald owner of Jackie's Pals in Houston, Texas, started her petsitting business after working eight years in a doctor's office. "I wanted to do something I enjoy," she says. "I love animals and I find this work is very calming." Mcdonald spoke with other petsitters in her area and discovered how busy they all were. She felt her neighborhood could support another petsitter. She was right. Mcdonald just completed a very busy and successful holiday season. Petsitting involves going into someone's home and caring for a pet when when the owner isn't available. The service can include plant watering and mail and newspaper pickup. The focus, however, is on the animal. Petsitting saves a client and the animal the aggravation of dealing with a kennel. Clients expect a variety of services: feeding, watering, liter box cleaner, pill giving, and especially some Tender Loving Care for a lonely animal who misses its master. ADVANTAGES, DISADVANTAGES Owning a petsitting business has many of the same advantages of owning any businessyou are your own boss, you set your own hours (depending on the number of clients you serve per day), and your paycheck will be limited only by your willingness to work. McDonald especially enjoys the flexible hours. "I also work out of my home," she says, "and that's a big advantage," Another advantage of petsitting is the opportunity of getting to know some real characters: Missy, the cat that only eats facing north (a real example, believe it or not), or Rufus, the bluefooted Amazon parrot who refuses to stay in a cage. Your list will be endless. McDonald describes the pleasure she finds in meeting both pets and their owners, "Ninetynine percent of the people are very nice. Most are concerned about their pets or they wouldn't call me. And the animals love me no matter what." As with any business,petsitting has a few disadvantages as well. If the business is to succeed, long hours and hard work is necessary. "this is not a get richquick scheme," McDonald says. Holidays will be especially busy. Servicing fifteen pets, each two times a day is not an unreasonable expectation. This doesn't leave much time for football viewing on New Year's Day. Unless you're a real animal lover some of the tasks can be unpleasant: Who wants to clean a litter box twice a day for two weeks? But that wildly wagging tail or the purr of a lonely animal that greets you at the door does make it worth the trouble. So do those paychecks at the end of the Christmas holidays. "you must truly love animals," McDonald advises, "or you won't enjoy this business." STARTUP COSTS Startup costs for petsitting business are small. Expenses can be divided into three categories: marketing, insurance, and transportation. Initial outlay can be as little as $200 or as much as 4300 if you choose to pay for a visit to an accountant. That isn't a bad idea. An accountant can explain tax laws and policies governing this type of business. In some states, for example, he or she will tell you not to charge sales tax because you perform a service that is not taxable. Although most clients will come your way by word of mouth, invest in a few marketing tools. Business cards are essential. Costing anywhere from $25 to $50, business cards can be placed anywhere pets are foundpet shops and vet clinics. Because most vet clients have kennel facilities, some may not allow you to place your card with them. Establish a relationship with a vet in your area, though, and he or she will begin to recommend you when the kennel facility is full. Design a flyer and place copies on community bulletin boards, church bulletin boards, at the grocery store, and any other place you can think of. "Welcometothecommunity" associations may be willing to give your card to new residents, too. Keep trying to get your business known. People will be delighted with this service when they hear that you are a top quality petsitter. If you can afford it, buy an answering machine. Once your business is booming, you'll need one to take all your business calls. Clients will ask if you are bonded. This means that an insurance company finds you trustworthy and is willing to put this in writing. An insurance policy protects the homes you enter. If something is broken while you are there, your policy will cover it. Being bonded, however does not protect against damage to pets while in your care. With this type of policy, your premium increases as your business increases. Initially your coverage cost $100 per year. As you client list increases, you can pay as much as $500 per year. Being bonded, however, is worth the expense. Clients are more likely to use your service if they know you're backed by an insurance company. Keep a log of business miles traveled in your car. Also keep track of gas and auto expenses. These are all tax deductible. OPERATIONS What are the mechanics involved with petsitting? When a client calls, arrange a meeting before his departure. This gives you an opportunity to see the pet, familiarize yourself with the routine, and get a key. The client also gets to check you out and give instructions. Appear professional. Have a printed instruction sheet ready for the client to complete. Include space for emergency phone numbers and vet information. Also include a section on pet preferences. A pet whose routine has no disruptions is a much happier one when his master returns. The master will be satisfied and you'll reap the benefits by gaining a repeat client. "Suggest that clients limit changes to a pet's routine," McDonald advises. the pet will be happier and easier to care for. Provide references to all clients who ask. When you're just starting out, ask a neighbor whose cat you've fed once or twice if she'll be a reference. Most clients won't call references, but will be wary if you've got no one to vouch for you. An important note here: ask clients to be specific about when they'll returning. Have them call you when they do get home. Avoid the disaster of one petsitter who clients was three days delayed and whose cat went unfed for that time. When you return your clients key you pickup your payment. WHAT TO CHARGE Determining a fee is a personal matter. McDonald consulted other petsitters in the area to determine an appropriate charge. fees range anywhere form $5 to $10 per visit. Some petsitters charge more for initial visit and less for subsequent visits. The fee will also depend on the number of pets involved and the amount of trouble they will be. Obviously the household with three cats, a turtle, two birds, and a hamster should be charged more than the one with a single dog. Decide in advance what your limits are, too. If you don't care to feed, water, and brush a horse each day be prepared to say no. Once your business takes off, one turned down request won't affect you. A wide variety of people will use a petsitting service. Certainly vacationers will be a numberone market. Therefore, holiday times will be extremely busy. Some people own pets but have little time to spend with themcouples who both work fulltime, and singles who travel. A few words of advice and notes of caution: * Be prepared for a mess. Bored animals are messy little things. They knock over plants, break vases, and chew furniture. Although yours is not a houseclenaing service, your clients will appreciate your efforts to tidy things up. * Follow your client's instructions to the letter. Even if no one but you knows Fido ate exactly at 6 P.M., do what is asked. Owners can detect when a pet's routine has gone wary. * Pregnant women should be aware of a condition known as toxoplasmosis. caused by a parasitic organism found in cat feces, toxoplasmosis can cause severe damage to a fetus. Pregnant women should use extreme caution when disposing of cat feces or else wait until after the baby is born to start a petsitting business. * Expect a few complainers. Most clients will love you. Some, however will be annoyed that Fifi's nails grew too long while she was in your care, or that Bucky seems listless since their return. A petsitting business is an easy one to start. The only requirement is a real love for animals. You will find that people are quite interested in your service and are more than willing to pay for it. McDonald sums it up this way: "this ia a very time consuming business. But I really enjoy it and I've learned from it. You're certainly compensated and it is very satisfying." WHAT IS MULTILEVEL AND HOW SHOULD IT BE WORKED? Multilevel marketing is really a partnership. You go into business with someone that has the same interests and goals you have. You make a commitment to each other. You work with the same people. Working multilevel marketing correctly not only makes success easier, it eliminates many problems. The hardest thing is to find the person you want to work with (your sponsor). You want someone who is willing to work and assist you when needed. You should join programs under the same person all the time. This makes for a solid downline. If your sponsor isn't interested in a particular program, contact his sponsor. By doing this, you will strengthen you group. Many people complain about others stealing their people. They seem to think that just because they signed someone up once, they should always have them. If someone gives their downline the help and assistance they should, there would be no need for them to worry about someone stealing them away. They should want to continue with you because they know you will help them. Why should someone stick with you if all you do is collected commissions from them? Can you really blame them for not following you into other programs? Take a look at the other side of the "coin". Having the right people in your downline is just as important as having the right sponsor. If someone sponsored you into a program and helped you, don't expect them to sign you in another program if you haven't tried to do anything on you own. Granted, they make money for those they sponsor for you, but why should they make you money if you don't do anything? Mailing out hundreds of brochures may get you several people in your downline. This may look good on a printout, but what about on a commission check? Would you rather have a printout a foot long with a small check  or a small printout with a large check? Be choosy in whom you recruit. Let them know what you expect from them and what they can expect from you. Level with them completely about the program you are trying to get them into. Having 2 or 3 good people will make you more money than having 10 or 12 deadbeats. Don't join every program that comes along. Find one you like and work it. It takes time to build a solid downline. Help your downline and have them do the same. This way everybody will make money. You can't expect to keep your downline if you leave them stranded when you get into profit. You have to help them get in profit too. They will be more apt to follow you in other programs this way. Be careful what you promise people. Remember, nothing is guaranteed. Be as honest as you can. Don't tell someone you'll do something if you can't. Offer your help, but guarantee nothing. No matter how good something might seem, it might not work. If you mislead people, how long do you expect to keep them? Doing things this way may take a little longer, but look at the advantages! You have a solid downline. You don't have to race to the phone or mailbox to be first to contact someone. Because you are working with the same people, you will get to know them. You will have a steady income. You don't have to worry about finding new "schemes" and new "victims" every few months. Actually, four things are needed to be successful in MLM. A good product, a good marketing structure, a good sponsor and a strong downline. The time and money spent to find these four things is well worth it. Don't settle for anything less. To do so will only restrict the goals you can achieve. Once you have found these four things, it's easy. All you have to do is keep in touch with your 5 or 6 people. If everyone does this, no one will fail. Everybody will be a success. HOW TO PROFIT IN FLEA MARKETING! On the outskirts of nearly every town across the U.S., especially in The spring, summer and fall, you will see a Flea Market setup. Often there will be hundreds of trailers, booths and tables in a large field just off a major thoroughfare. How do these people operate? Where do they get their merchandise? Do they make any money? Whether they make any money or not depends on the way each individual merchant operates, what type of merchandise is offered and how much time is devoted to the business. Most of them set up their wares on weekends an spend the rest of the week searching for goods to sell. Good antique dealers who know their product generally make very good profits. Clothing dealers, in the right location, can often bring in up to $600 on a typical weekend. Jewelry, including rings, various kinds of necklaces, and silver and gold are bIg sellers. Large, heavy and bulky items are not generally favorable for flea markets. The secret to making a profit in Flea Marketing is not what or how you sell. It's what you buy and how you buy it! You must find items which will sell for 8 to 10 times more than cost, unless you have really favorable products that will sell in large quantity. The products should be unusual; things which can't be obtained locally, unless the price is substantially below market. You can get seconds and damaged goods direct from many factories across the country, often at very little cost just to get them out of their warehouse where they are taking up room and gathering dust. Call on the managers in person or send letters offering to purchase factory closeouts, etc. Hand out your business cards letting people know that you are in the business of purchasing various kinds of merchandise. Auctions, garage sales and yard sales are other good sources. Don't overlook the classifieds in the paper. Offer to clean out attics and garages and haul "junk" away. Many times the "junk" turns into the most lucrative profit items. You will have to learn to "bargain" with the people on all your purchases in order to get them to sell for a low figure. MAKING THE MOST MONEY AT FLEA MARKETS Over the last several years the flea market and swap meets have become as American as apple pie. According to a recent issue of Swap Meet magazine, over 600 such functions are being held on a regular basis. Most of these are weekend affairs, but more and more are operating every day of the week. The biggest flea market of them all is the monthly affair held on the grounds of the Pasadena Rose Bowl. Over 40,000 people attend this function, with over 2000 "dealers" selling their wares. Another giant of the circuit is the one held each week in San Jose  the famous San Jose Flea Market. It isn't unusual for 25,00030,000 people to visit this great function each and every day, rain or shine. It is so popular and profitable for the "dealers" that nearly 50% of the spaces are rented on a permanent basis. At timeS there is a one or two year waiting list to get a permanent space. Practically any item imaginable can be  and is  sold at these affairs. Your author has visited several, and talked to hundreds of dealers. The overall average NET INCOME seems to be around $125 per day. Some of the socalled "smart" people are earning as much as $500 per day. Most of the people sell two days per week, while some travel and sell four and five days a week. What to Sell As mentioned before, almost anything can be sold at flea markets and swap meets; however, some lines seem to outpull most of the rest. I know one guy who has set up a regular route and collects used spark plugs from dozens of service stations and garages. He takes them home, soaks them in a cleaning solution and then applies a spark plug sand blasting machine. He then sorts them according to application and packages them according to the size of the engine. You will find him every weekend at the San Jose flea market, offering his products for $1.50 per set. He tells me that he is usually sold out by noon every day  which is all he wants to work anyhow. He averages about 100 sets  or $150 per day. One of the most popular lines to sell is clothing: jeans, blouses, shirts, skirts, etc.  both new and used. Shop the Goodwill and Second Hand stores for your inventory. Also keep an eye on your local newspaper for closeouts. Other popular items are jewelry, auto parts, tools and used books. As always, flea market shoppers are looking for a super deal on anything they buy. So be sure to price your merchandise below the retail price; the lower the price, the faster you'll sell  dealing in volume will make your NET PROFIT higher! $25,000 per year, working just three or four days per week, is not unusual in this business. One guy, an electronics engineer who was without a job, started selling unusual novelty items at the flea market. Inside of just five weeks, once he discovered what was selling at his flea market, he was earning $500 per week  more than he earned at his old job. Perhaps one of the most profitable items to sell at flea markets is used paperback books. It isn't unusual for a serious dealer to earn over $200 per day selling this line. People will buy books at all times of the year  nearly everyone reads something. One such dealer is Willie Nelson, who earns his fulltime income selling books at the flea market. He spends two days each week locating used books, and two days per week selling them. On average Wilie sells over $300 worth of used books each week, and his cost is less than $50 for the merchandise, along with about $10 per week for the rental space. The last time I visited a flea market I counted seven different dealers specializing in used books, and all of them were selling something. The largest dealer, with a giant selection, was pricing his books at 25% of the cover price  and they were selling like hotcakes. His cost for the books was about 5 cents each. So you can see that his profits were excellent. To conclude this section, remember, nearly anything will sell at flea markets and swap meets if the discount is large enough, but some items will sell faster than others. The big sellers are clothing articles, auto parts, tools, jewelry, toys and used paperback books. Later in this presentation I'll give you some ideas that will be helpful in locating your merchandise at the right price. How to Sell If you are selling other than handcrafted items, most people are looking for a real bargain. If an item sells for a dollar in a store, you must be prepared to sell it for less, no matter how new it looks. If you have access to a public address system or a call horn, use it! You have the added versatility of telling people what you are selling even if they are too far away for you to see what you have for sale. When you set up your table, step in front of it to see if it catches your eye. Don't forget bold signs, especially for the smaller items you have for sale. Remember, most of your crowd is just walking by, therefore, you must attract their attention in some way, make them stop and look. Display racks can be used for making your item look more expensive  and thus a better bargain. You might be able to make use of a rack on top of your car. It can carry things to and from the flea market and hold signs to attract customers while you are there. Also, remember how you packed the car. If you're outdoors, and it rains, you'll want to repack your items in a hurry! Prices have to be clear unless you intend to haggle. If you decide to haggle, quote a price higher than what you expect to sell for, and come down to the level of the price you have decided your article is worth. It is generally not a good idea to haggle over very lowpriced items unless the customer wishes to purchase an exceptionally large quantity of the item. If you'd rather simply sell your items for a set price, make signs that are easy to read from far away. Be sure to bring a marker and extra paper in case you decide to raise or lower your prices at any time during the day. Things to Bring Another person. This is very important. You will not want to leave your table unattended while you go to the restroom or to look at something on someone else's table. You'll also be glad for the company if things get slow. Plenty of change. You wouldn't want to lose a sale because you couldn't change a given dollar bill, would you? Be sure to bring chairs or something else to sit on. It can be a very long day if you have to stand. Check to see if tables are provided or if you are expected to supply your own. Make sure in either case that you have enough display space so that your items are not hidden. It is also a good idea to bring a thermos or cooler with drinks and food to last you the day. Much of your fleamarket profit can be spent at the concession stand if you don't! Check to see how much of an admission fee there is and be sure to bring it. Also ask if there are any items that are forbidden for sale. One last thing: Get there early! At some eight o'clock openings, for example, the lines start forming at five a.m. Have a good time! Sources of Supply... The following sources of supply are good for purchasing the merchandise indicated within each listing. These are the items that have proved profitable over the years by successful flea market merchants. Write to them for full pricing details (addresses accurate at time of publication, but cannot be guaranteed). Lakeside Imports, 6800 N. Campbell Ave., Chicago, IL 60645. Provides a large selection of merchandise available at up to 85% discount. Write for catalog. Atlantic Imports, 743 Beaubien, Detroit, MI 48225. Fastselling low price items are available at giant discounts. Write for wholesale catalog and prices. Sheldon Cord Co., 2201 W. Devon Ave., Chicago, IL 60625. Giant selection of nearly anything you wish to sell  featuring closeout prices on stereos, jewelry, toys, gifts, gadgets, etc. Send $1.00 for giant catalog. Wallfrin La Cal Industries. 1535 Har Pl., Brooklyn, NY 11224. Offers catalog of auto accessories. 50% discount and more. North American Auto Supply, Box 897, Aurora, IL 60507. Oil filters for all makes of car. Write for price lists. Unique Products, 426 S. Clinto St., Chicago, IL 60607. Air fresheners, deodorizers and novelty items. Catalog available  discounts to 80% or more in volume. Bar Zim Co., 930 Newark Ave., Jersey City, NJ 07306. Games and toys. Free details. Flinson Co., 6014 Kentucky Ave., Raytown, MS 64133. Fastselling household items ideal for flea markets. Write for catalog. Salton Co., 519 E. 72nd St., New York, NY 10021. Or, Gallant Co., 527 W. 7th St., Los Angeles, CA 90014. Catalog on gift appliances available. ScanAm Co., 23404 Harland, Canoga Park, CA 91304. Large selection of gift products available, the kind that sell at flea markets. Free price list. Ward International, Box 3268, Granada Hills, CA 91344. Loads of specialty merchandise that sells good at flea markets. Free catalog. Edwards Products, Box 63, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034. Good products, such as the "Hamburger Maker". Free catalog sheets. Leather Co., Box 71, Nestor, CA 92053. All types of jackets, purses, wallets, etc. 75% discount and more Write for free catalog. American Cartridge Recording, 24 W. Sheffield Ave., Englewood, NJ 07631. Offers stereo tapes  all brands. Free catalog. Jakla Gems Co., 2849 Southport Ave., Chicago, IL 60657. Catalog of rings and other jewelry  discounts to 90% of retail prices. Worthington Gem Co., Box 1324 New Brunswick, NJ 08903. Catalog or rings and stuff  discounts to 80%. Federal Vending Co., Box 1713, Des Moines, IO 50306. Complete line of vending machines. Ideal sideline profits at flea markets. Write for details. Stride Publications, 11 W. 42nd St., New York, NY 10036. Assorted titles of paperback books  Free catalog. Nostrand Book Co., 276 Brighton Beach Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11235. Used and overprint paperback books. Select Discount Books, 712 S. Missouri Ave., Clearwater, FL 33516. Surplus, overstocks, remainders, etc., paperback and hardcover books. Up to 85% discount. Miscellaneous Sources of Supply... Good used merchandise sometimes can be located at the right price at garage sales, local Salvation Army Stores, Goodwill, rummage sales, etc. Check the local factories in your area. Seconds are big sellers at flea markets. Check the classified ad sections of your newspaper for super sales  goingoutofbusiness offers and that sort of thing. In this fastmoving market local closeout sales may be your best supply source. Last, but certainly not least, how about looking around the flea market itself? Lots of people clean out their garage and bring their "junk" to the flea market to sell. If you catch them at the right time, make an offer on their stuff. If you are going to be there each week, you can afford to take the chance, whereas they don't want to have to cart back the stuff that doesn't sell. Remember Willie Nelson, the book dealer I mentioned before? Most of his used books are purchased right at the flea market. What he does is look around at the tail end of the day and make an offer to purchase the whole lot of books that people are trying to sell. He once took a look at four boxes of used books  about 200 of them  and bought the whole lot. The owner was asking 25 cents each, and the cover prices ran from 95 cents to $1.95 each. He bought he entire lot for 5 cents each and the owner was thrilled to death. He certainly didn't want to tote the books back home again; to him, some bucks were better than no bucks at all. Here's another tip you should remember: a large percentage of the sellers at flea markets are there just for the day, while you are the Professional Fleamarketeer... so don't get desperate and try to unload at any price. What doesn't sell today may very well sell tomorrow, or next week. If you keep your inventory up, the sales will come, provided you have carried the right line of merchandise. A Few Thou Shalls and Thou Shall Nots Everyone enjoys earning a profit, but there is also a great deal of ego boosting by the buyers when they are able to reduce your "asking" price. Remember, everyone at flea markets and swap meets is looking for a bargain. If you are selling, for example, brand new electronic watches, with a retail price of $50 and a cost to you of $12 your asking price should be $35  let them talk you down to $25. This still gives you a tidy profit, but more important, your customers have saved a big $10, and they're happy. Once of the most successful Fleamarketeers I know sells nothing but $1 sellers, and he sells out nearly every day  all he can carry in his van. He specializes in just one or two items at a time. The last time I passed his space he had set up a pegboard display and was selling disposable lighters and new doubleedged razor blades, both wellknown brands. Because he buys these two items in such large quantities his cost is just about 15 percent of retail price. Now you are going to say, "How in the world can you make any money at about 50 cents profit per sale?" Well, if you sell 500 units per day, that's $250, right? This guy has sold as many as 1000 units in a given day, and that's $500 profit! For small items that you might price under $1, use a box, and make up a sign, "Any Item in this Box 99 cents each". People at flea markets love this type of thing... they will buy items on impulse if the price is right! Walter Harpin was selling toy items one year, with an asking price as low as 50 cents up to $1.50 each. This was during the summer months, when there were lots of kids around, most of them with a buck or two in their pockets. Walter set a great big box in front of his space, tied a few balloons around the edges and priced everything in the box for 99 cents each. Within an hour the box was empty. Needless to say, from that point on Walter had two and sometimes three such boxes full of such items. His profits nearly doubled when he used this method, and you'll find him at every flea market meeting day in San Jose. If you are selling used merchandise, be sure to polish everything before you put it up for sale. Clean "junk" will outsell dirty "junk" every time. Don't be afraid to be different! Some sellers string up flying banners  the type popular with car dealers  or balloons. Anything to attract attention and people to the space. Another idea is to find something unusual and big to place upfront. Something that everyone will stop and inspect. Then place a ridiculous price on it and make up a story that attaches an emotional value on it. One woman came up with an old wooden horse from a merrygoround, and put a price of just $1 on it. It didn't sell, but the people sure gathered around her space  and her sales were fantastic! Send for a copy of Swap Meet magazine, which provides interesting reading about the business, and contains a directory of every flea market in the world. Write to Swap Meet, 793 Higuera St., San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. With the exception of used books, the bestselling merchandise is NEW stuff  not old, used junk as most people would guess. Purchase in lots at rockbottom price, keep your selling price under $3 and offer discounts of at least 30% of retail. It will make the difference; you'll carry home money instead of merchandise. When you are stuck with slowmoving merchandise, offer it in groups  two for the price of one, three for a buck, that sort of thing. Answers to a Few Key Questions... Q How much profit should I expect? Take your cost and add 40%, on the average. Some items, such as used books, will allow for more profit. And then, of course, if you buy smart, you will certainly make more. Q Do I have to collect a sales tax? Yes, but most flea markets provide you with a form to fill out; you collect the tax and turn it in at the end of the day. A better way to handle this, though, is to obtain a permit from city hall and collect the tax yourself. Q What is the average cost of space? Usually between $3 and $10 per day for an open space. If you are going to be there regularly, it may be a good idea to rent a permanent space, which can run as little as $50 per month. Some markets offer covered buildings, which may be locked at the end of the day (meaning you don't have to lug all your stuff home). Spaces in these buildings average about $150 per month. Q What equipment will I need? How high is up? Some types of merchandise require display racks, the pegboard type; others can be stacked in boxes, or on portable shelves. A good folding table is useful for displaying your merchandise, and you will need a few paper bags for your customers. Other than that, a cash box that locks is all you'll need. However, don't forget about yourself! Bring along some creature comforts  a chair, radio, refreshments, etc. During the summer months it's also a good idea to bring along something that provides shade, unless you enjoy having your top exposed to the rays. Q I can't operate as a salesman  what kind of pressure is required? Flea markets have become a family outing type of thing these days, and most people are having a good time simply hunting for super bargains. For the most part you should either mark the price on each item, or make up signs stating your prices. Actually, there is very little selling you have to worry about, and certainly no pressure. Pick your merchandise carefully, price it right... and the rest will take care of itself. This report cannot possibly give you all the facts, but it will get you started earning some bucks at the flea market. The more you get into it, the more you learn. And the more you learn, the more money will come your way. you might give it a try. HOME BUSINESS GUIDE TO EASY MONEY Because tens of thousands of people all across America want to know how they can work at home and earn enough money to run a household, there is a special need for this report. Today the need for women to work out of the home is stronger than ever. According to recent surveys, almost 70% are married and contribute up to 50% and more to the family income. Because family responsibilities play such an important part in the lives of men and women, millions of individuals and couples are seeking ways to make money at home. In the past decade moneymaking, homebased opportunities that match a person's skills, interests, abilities, and ingenuity have become almost limitless. This purpose of this report is to show you that it's simple and easy to join the ranks of successminded people by choosing a workathome program that suits your interest and needs. Business histories have shown over and over again that the rewards and advantages of working at home can go far beyond a person's wildest dreams. In fact, it's perfectly possible to launch a small business in your garage, backyard, basement, or a room in your home, and become a giant corporation. Your first step will be to study the company listings in this report, and then contact those that interest you. It's possible you may not be interested in many of those listed in this brief report. But others may serve as that great motivator that makes you look further with a renewed determination. Once you develop that mindset, persistence will follow and then nothing will stop you from achieving your goals. BECOME A GOAL SETTER! If you expect any level of success you must set goals. If you expect to be successful, you must determine what that means to you and the best way to achieve it. There are two basic steps you can take to covert goals into achievement: 1) You can decide on a specific dollar amount; and 2) You can set a time frame for obtaining the dollar amount you want. Your goal should be specific and indicate, What, When, Where. After making a list of every possible way you might accomplish a goal, select the method that best suits your situation. IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS YOU MUST ASK YOURSELF 1)"How can I support my family while I build up my business?" This question must be worked out according to each individual's circumstances. Many people start out on a parttime basis after their regular jobs to see how much they can handle. Then when their incomes reach a certain level they will switch over and go full time. 2) What are my abilities? To determine your abilities you will have to take an inventory of yourself. Decide what you enjoy doing the most and what your "feel" you would be good at. Examine every possibility and include every skill you have no matter how slight. 3) Is there a market for the product or service I have chosen? Be cautious before you invest any money! Check it out by making inquiries directly to the company, competitors, or firms who are marketing a product similar to the one you are interested in. Test it on a small scale. Check it thoroughly. 4) How long will it take this business to reach the financial goal I must have? It's really a question of knowing how much time you can dedicate to your business, and what your profits are for that time. From there, a simple addition will tell you how long it might take to reach a particular financial goal. SUCCESS IS HAVING THE COURAGE TO BEGIN! Starting a business at home is an economical way to start a small business that can easily grow into to a larger one. Many entrepreneurs have proven that you don't need a huge manufacturing plant to develop a successful business. Some of the most successful businesses in existence today started in a spare room or garage. It isn't how you start out that is important. What really matters is did you have the courage to begin. SELECTING THE RIGHT PRODUCT OR SERVICE Take a close look at your interests and abilities, and then decide what type of marketing you want to do. For example, do you want to sell directly to people; or would you prefer selling wholesale to retail outlets? If you prefer doing piecework or assembling items for manufacturers, make certain it's something you enjoy working with. If you enjoy oneonone sales, then test the product out on your friends, relative,neighbors. The object is to find out what has the most appeal. DEVELOP A GOOD MARKETING TECHNIQUE A good marketing techniques is one part of the business plan that is absolutely essential to it's success. In fact, the ability to properly market a product or service is actually more important than the product itself. Even an inferior product can be a financial success if marketed properly. Seek out the advice of everyone in your field. Explain your needs and ask them questions. Experience is the best teacher. With good advice and a salable product, you should be able to develop a winning marketing plan. FINANCING YOUR HOMEBASED VENTURE The first place to look for financing is right at home. Take an inventory of items you don't need and have a garage sale. Most people are pleasantly surprised at how much cash can be raised in a single weekend. Next, turn to members of your family or close friends who have faith in you and want to see you succeed. Offer to repay them through profitsharing. Go to individuals in your community who and believe in your personal worth. If you have a good credit history your banker should consider you a good financial risk. Two other excellent sources would be your local Small Business Administration (SBA) and Chamber of Commerce. SBA has low interest loans available for qualified applicants and your Chamber of Commerce can assist you with referrals and other helpful information. WORKATHOME OPPORTUNITIES ARE EVERYWHERE! Anyone who is serious about workathome opportunities need only look around them. There are thousands of options everywhere! There are employment opportunities that involve becoming an independent contractor; working on a commission basis; working for a salary; freelancing for pay; getting paid by the hour, receiving pay for each piece assembled; getting paid by the project, or a combination of any of the above. No doubt, what you finally decide on will depend on your particular needs and interests. Read the following listings carefully, and when you're ready contact any that interest you. Don't become discouraged if the company you contact isn't hiring right at the moment. Often circumstances change rapidly. Use you imagination to convince an employer there are great advantaged to giving you work! Be a selfmotivator and continue moving forward towards the goals you want and deserve. Do it starting NOW! DIRECTORY OF HOMEWORKER INCOME OPPORTUNITIES INFOPRENEUR, Box 96, Dept K18, Purdy, MO 65734-0096 If your looking for a business that offers huge mark-ups on products and were you don't have to share the profits with anyone, then selling reports that you copy for pennies and sell for dollars just might be for you. It's an easy and very profitable business to be in. To get a copy of the 28 page guide "Reprintable Riches" which lists over 1000 reports with reprint rights simply send 3 stamps or $1 to Infopreneur, Box 96, Purdy, Dept K18, Purdy, MO 65734-0096. LITTLEGUY'S Box NFP, Winkleman, AZ 85292. If you enjoy making craft items but hate selling them, or are looking for a way to sell more, look no further! This company says they will purchase homemade items from you, or refer you to other companies who are buyers. All types of hobby crafts are considered. Enclose a 29 cent postage stamp when writing for more information. ELITE ENTERPRISES P.O. Box 31577, Chicago, IL 606310577. Get your share of the billion dollar popcorn market! Elite enterprises has put together a incredible program for making money that involves the distribution of one America's favorite foodsPopcorn! 56 gourmet flavors of popcorn to be exact. Write to Robert Doncaster for more information. WOMAN'S EXCHANGE, INC. 3 Village St.,Heritage Village, Southbury, CT 06488. Woman's Exchange, Inc. is a nonprofit national organization with 41 lefts. Handcrafted items of all kinds are marketed at small markup through storefront operations. Most needed are children's clothing, quilts, and fine hand sewing. Most needed are women are participating nationwide. SUITCASE BOUTIQUE 12228 Spring Court Place, Maryland Heights, MO 53043. Suitcase Boutique is a home party. This company buys many types of handcrafted items including stuffed animals, wood crafts, toys, soft sculptures, framed pictures and cross stitch. Crafter should send a photo and description of their products. CRADLE GRAM, P.O. Box 164135, Miami, FL 33116 The sale of personalized birth and baptismal announcements can be made in a variety of ways from inhome direct sales, to fundraising organizations. The CradleGram marketing department is especially good at assisting with any type of instore promotion campaign. This company has been in business several years and pays representative 30% commissions on each sale. Payment is immediate, and all orders are filled within 72 hours. ARBONNE INTERNATIONAL, INC.,, Direct sales of European cosmetics and skin products. Representatives build customer bases using any direct sales method that works for them. Training and ongoing managerial support is provided. Pays commission. CAMEO COUTURES, INC.,9004 Ambassador Row, P.O. Box 47390, Dallas, TX 75247. Home party sales of lingerie, cosmetics and food supplements. Training is provided. Pays commission. OLSTEN HEALTH CARE SERVICES, STAFFING COORDINATORS. Olsten has over 300 offices nationwide in it's health care services division. Each office has a minimum of two homebased staffing coordinators jobsharing on a sevendayson, sevendaysoff schedule. The jobs consist of taking calls during the day evenings, and on weekends to dispatch the appropriate personnel for hospital and home health care positions. Some staffing experience or medical background is required. Write to locate the office nearest you then apply directly to that office. Pays weekly salary plus placement bonus. RESEARCH TRAINING INSTITUTE, Hanes Bldg.,Research Triangle Park, Raleigh, NC 27601. __________________________________________________________ Interviewers for option research surveys conducted primarily in the field. Triangle is a nonprofit social research organization operating nationwide. Good communication skills required. Send letter of interest. Pays hourly rate in some areas, pays per survey in others. Training is provided. TOM SYNDER PRODUCTIONS, INC., 123 Auburn St.,Cambridge, MA 02138. __________________________________________________________ Contract programmers and software engineers. Company produces educational games for Apple, Atari, Commodore and IBM. Most of the available work is conversation from machine to machine. Send resume and work samples. Pays by the job or hourly rate of $10$40 per hour. QUICK KEY DATA, 415 Rutgers Road, West Babylon, NY 11704. Quick Key Data is a data and wordprocessing service that acts as an organization of homebased freelance professionals. For an annual listing fee of $25, homeworkers in upstate New York and Long Island can receive subcontracted assignments for secretarial services and/or database management. Homeworkers keep 7080% of the billed amount. DREAMSCAPES, 2140 E. 7th Place 1, Los Angeles, CA 90021. Put yourself in an exciting new profit picture with this company's original Dreamscapes, a unique picture of sand and colored liquid that when turned over creates and endless variety of beautiful landscape. It's fascinating, irresistible, mesmerizing, and profitable. Sell them at flea markets, fairs, and anywhere people gather. Write for details. HANKINS MARKETING GROUP, P.O. Box 1681, Salisbury, NC 28114 Aching feet is America's No. 1 medical complaint. AirFlo Insole is a revolutionary breakthrough that helps. Its patented vacuum principle allows air to enter the insole when the foot is lifted and gradually releases it when the wearer steps down. It's like walking on air! Learn how you can make up to 160% profit selling this item to individuals, retail, and chain stores. Write for details. GLASSMATE SIGNS, 409 Calle San Pablo, Camarillo, CA 93010 The manufacture of the original sliding "OPEN/CLOSED" signs are offering you a chance to make some good profits. 30 new colors have been added. Write for details. FAMOUS PHOTOS 475 Kahali Avenue, Honolulu, HI 96816 Start your own celebrity photo pose business. This is the hottest novelty concept in years! You photograph customers with a lifesize figure of President Bush or some other national figure or celebrity. All the profits are yours! Write for details. NATIONAL COLLEGE OF APPRAISAL & PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, 6065 Rosewell Road, Suite 2232, Atlanta, GA 30328 Become a professional real estate appraiser with this home study course. Study at your own pace. Enjoy the excellent income potential, and become financially independent! Write for more information. PICNIC PROJECTS, P.O. Box 87, Towanda, PA 18848 You can make $600 week or more, building and selling high quality picnic tables. if you enjoy working with wood, contact this company for more details. VON SCHRADER COMPANY, 1600 Junction Avenue, Racine, WI 53403 If you have ever dreamed of owning your own business, this company may have the perfect opportunity for you. Carpet, upholstery, and wall cleaning are in high demand and the profits are huge! You can offer all three of these services for a fraction of the price a franchise would. Write to them for more information. CAJUN COUNTRY CANDIES, 502 Evangeline Drive, Lafayette, LA 705015534 Who ever invented the word Delicious, was probably eating Roy Babineaux's "sweetest ever yet" Cajun Country Candy! This product is a leader when it comes to "selling itself." One taste and you're hooked. You could be the first to introduce Roy's world famous products into your area. Roy has a marketing plan that can make you rich! No inventory is required. BADGEAMINT, 346 North 30th Road, Box 800, LaSalle, IL 61301 You have seen them worn by people, each with a different message, but have you ever considered the huge profits that are made from button sales. Write for details. HOLIDAY MAGIC, P.O. Box 882314, San Francisco, CA 94188 This company offers three different products that can be assembled at home. 1) The Christmas Oven Mitt, 2) Crystal Splendor (a Christmas Ornament), and 3) a Valentine Heart MiniPillow. They pay supply costs write for Free Details. SATIN DOLL ENTERPRISES, 78 Water St.,Beverly, MA 01915 Earn up to $100 per day with doll lingerie that sells itself. Write for startup information. TV PROJECTOR COMPANY, 2410 Orchard Road, McHenry, IL 60050 New TV Projector kit turns any TV set into a lifesize 7foot screen! This is a product that sells on sight for only $20. You can make 400% profits fast! Write for details. MODERN CARD COMPANY, INC.,3855 N. Lincoln Avenue, Chicago, IL 60613 Greeting cards represent a billion dollar business and the oders are large. this company says it needs sincere, ambitious people who can show their line of cards and other items to merchants. Write for samples and details. RECOGNITION SERVICES, P.O. Box 30288, Indianapolis, IN 46230 Every business, corporation, institution, church, school and organization is a potential customer of recognition awards. As a representative of this company, you can provide jewelry and custommade embroidered emblems that include: Lapel pins, medals, medallions, and cloth emblems that are custom made in any shape or color. Write for details. NAVAJO MANUFACTURING CO., 5801 Logan St.,Denver, CO 80216 Navjo Manufacturing is a source of products for retailer that includes fashion and authentic American Indian Jewelry, sunglasses, toys, plush animals, and many other novelties. Write for more details. POLISH MASTERS, 364 Ramble Ridge Rd.,Thousands Oaks, CA 91360 Polish Masters will help you become part of the hottest new concepts ever to hit the auto appearance industry. With their systems you can earn up to $400 per day cleaning and polishing autos, boats, R.V's, and airplanes. There is no franchise fee to pay, and they will work with you every step of the way. Wwrite for free details. WORLD DISTRIBUTORS, 331 W. Montrose Ave.,Chicago, IL 60618 You can sell jewelry, watches, perfumes, clocks, wallets, religious items, tapestries, cutlery, tools, lamps, toys, housewares, and much more when you become a distributor with this company. Send for Their catalog. CADIE PRODUCTS CORPORATION, 100 Sixth Ave.,Paterson, NJ 07524 Involves packaging small items produced by the company. No machinery or experience is required. Pays piece rate. LUCKY HEART COSMETICS, INC.,138 Hurling Ave.,Memphis, TN 38103 Lucky Heart Cosmetics, Inc. carries a line of cosmetics for Black Women. Independent distributors are wanted. Commission plus bonuses. Management opportunities available. NICHOLS BRONZE SUPPLY, 389 Sebring Airport, Sebring, FL 33870 Bronze baby shoes at home and make $250 per day. A free brochure will show you how to start making money immediately preserving baby shoes, sports items, and many other types of keepsakes, in bronze, gold, and chinakote pearl. This company claims to be the world's largest supplier of elegant cultured marble mountings. DICKENS MATSON U.S.A., 21023 Gratiot Ave.,East Detroit, MI 48021 This company is looking for people to assemble clowns from their home. The work is fun and easy. Write for free details. ARBITRON RATINGS, INC.,312 Marshall Ave.,Laurel, MD 20707 This company hires telephone interviewers for market research surveys. Positions require communication skills and private phone lines. NOWCO INTERNATIONAL INC.,1 George Ave.,WilkesBarre, PA 18705 Work at home and cash in on the gift basket boom! This company sells gift basket packaging to the champagne and caviar trade throughout the country. Write for more details. MAGIC SYSTEMS, INC.,P.O. Box 23991, Tampa, FL 33623 Make profits of up to $100 or more per hour imprinting messages and designs on TShirts. Hundreds of other items can also be imprinted. Write for free details on how you can get started without lengthy courses. CENTRALSHIPPE, INC.,46 Start Lake Ave.,Blomington, NJ 07040 Involves manual assembly of color cards, swatching, inserting and mailing. Homeworkers receive piece rates for putting swatch cards together. ANKA CO.,INC., 90 Greenwich Ave.,Warwick, RI 02886 Attention wholesalers, retailers, flea market dealers, and independent homebased salespeople. This company has rings and costume jewelry for men and women at low wholesale prices. There are several hundred different ring styles with genuine and simulates stones, gold and silver plated necklaces, bracelets, earrings and watches. Write for full color catalog. HOW TO MAKE UP TO $1,000 EVERY WEEK WITH YOUR CAMERA! As millions of Americans look for greater control over their financial destiny, the dream of selfemployment has become more compelling that ever. Just the idea of launching a small business to become their own boss, and financially independent, drives many people to stake their life savings on everything from franchise opportunities to some gadgets they've invented. To entrepreneurial spirit is, of course, a part of our great national tradition. The problem is that many people devote a lot of their time to halfbaked ideas and highrisk flings that have little chance of success. There is always some gamble involved when you start a business, whether your investment is $50.00 or $500.00, or more. But once you begin to view your new business as a "gambling" the riskreward radio tilts out of wack! The shrewdest and most successful entrepreneurs know that "taking the plunge" works best when you take along tested principles that put the odds in their favor. TAKE WHAT YOU HAVE LEARNED AND BUILD YOUR BUSINESS AROUND IT If you decide to join the ranks of selfemployed freelance photographers, you will soon discover there is no magic in being able to earn thousands of dollars every year. Forget about the notion that you can start up a business just because you have a camera laying around you know little or nothing about. If you try the casual "learn on the job" approach with photography and competitors will capitalize on your mistakes, promoting customers to turn elsewhere for the products and services you market. Then your business will be floundering by the time you get to know what it takes to succeed. Never expect people to pay you while you practice on them and waste their time and money. And never take an assignment you can't handle. Being honest with yourself and your customers will be your benefit in the longrun. The best approach to starting your freelance photography business is to start off slowly and build on a base of knowledge and experience. In other words, take the knowledge that you presently have about your camera and build a company around it. Start out by offering a particular service where you can be competitive from the first day you are open for business. YOU DON'T NEED A STUDIO & FRENCH PROVINCIAL FURNITURE TO GET STARTED You don't have to open a studio with elegant french provincial furniture, glass showcases, and large expensive frames all over the walls, to go into business as a freelance photographer. It's actually just the opposite; you don't need a studio at all! What you will need, is a camera, a couple of stobe lights, lights stands, and a blackandwhite darkroom setup. From there, it's just as easy for you to go to your customers as it is for them to go to a studio. How much money you make will depend on the amount of time you want to devote to your business. The beauty of being a freelance photographer is that you can create your own markets, and establish your own rates. If you go into freelancing with the intent to earn extra money working on weekends, you should be able to earn $1,000$2,000 per weekend if you did nothing but shoot weddings followed with package deals. If you decide to go into business on a fulltime basis, then you could earn up to $50,000 and more depending on your specialty. It really boils down to one important thing; you must have the ability to use the equipment you have to produce a good photograph. People are willing to pay top dollar if you produce quality results. They don't like paying for poor work that isn't pleasing or effective. BEING SUCCESSFUL IS SELLING WHAT YOU ALREADY KNOW HOW TO PRODUCE In this report we are assuming that you already know something about operating a camera, taking pictures, exposure, lighting, composition, and darkroom procedures. This is the production end of it. Turning your knowledge into salable photography is the next step. The first rule to remember is that if you are offered a job, and you don't even know the basics, you better say "no thank you," and tell the client why you're passing it up. Tell him what you do specialize in at the moment. When the next job comes around, you will have an established reputation on being honest and that same person will be back 1) because he respects your honesty; and 2) because if you say you can do a job, you can. ADVERTISE YOUR WORK IN A PORTFOLIO Make up a portfolio of quality 8x10 prints to show your potential clients. It should consist of both color and black and white prints. Mount your 8x10 prints on attractive 11x14 boards, that way you can include a few 11x14 prints as well. A complete portfolio should include some 35mm slides. Display them in 8 1/2x11 plastic sheets, which hold 20 slides. If you intend to produce 2 1/4x 2 1/2 transparencies for commercial and industrial assignments, sheets are available. When you are satisfied with your portfolio, call on advertising agencies and show the art director what you are capable of. Make appointments with the art and fashion directors of department stores and boutiques. Show business and industrial firms and consider beforehand how their advertising and public relations departments could use your services. Be prepared to show your work to anyone at anytime. Everyone is a potential customer, and you never know who will be needing your services next. Carry your portfolio in the car at all times. If you are proud of your work, show it! Make advertising what you do part of your everyday life. KNOWING WHAT TO CHARGE The first thing to remember is that you aren't going into business to give it away. Being fair to both yourself and your customers is the principle you should follow when setting fees. The way to do that is to determine what amount will adequately compensate you for your time, talent, and investment in equipment on a job by job basis. Don't fall into the trap of charging less for your work just because you aren't working out of a studio, or don't have brandnew, expensive equipment. You still have overhead! At times your expenses will seem endless as you pay for photo supplies, office supplies, advertising, travel expenses, water and electricity if you operate your own darkroom, darkroom supplies and equipment, taxes, business license, business stationery, portfolio costs, business cards, and depreciation of your vehicle and photo equipment. Never let anyone convince you that you should work for less because you don't have overhead. What you ultimately decide to charge for your work is something you will have to decide for yourself. the area you live in, the economy in that area, the competition, and how much you need are all influencing factors. There are basically two ways to set your fees: 1) You can charge per individual photograph or job. On a job you would have to know exactly how many different shots they would require, and allow for differences in your price quote; or 2) You can charge an hourly rate that compensates you for your time and talent. Your hourly rate does not include the rolls of film you shoot, proofs, processing, or prints ordered by your client. Your hourly rate is for your time only, starting from the time you leave your home until you finish the job and return home. In some cases charging by the hour just wouldn't be practical. For example, prom sets, graduation packages, dance schools, or Little League Teams where you are further ahead to charge by the photo. Commercial shots on the other hand, where you may be asked to take a single photo that ends up taking 12 hours to set up, wouldn't pay if you charged by the photo. EARN $50,000 PER YEAR WORKING 1DAY A WEEK! Whether it's a good or bad economy one thing for certain there will always be weddings and work for freelance photographers. Wordofmouth advertising works well no matter what product or service you are selling. But it works especially well if you are a photographer in the wedding pictures business. When a bride is pleased with the quality of your work, she will pay a $1,000 for your time, talent, album for each of the parent couple, wall photos, and her album. But it is her album that everyone she ever knew, or will ever know, will be invited to look at. Most of the work will come through referrals from brides who were happy with your work. You should also promote your business, however, by showing samples of your work to florists, bridal shops, boutiques, and caterers who normally have a lot of wedding business. Just tell them you would be happy to send business their way, if they will do the same. Always sign a contract with the bride so there are no misunderstandings. Specific which photos will be taken, and of whom. Always include a "release Paragraph" which states that you are not responsible for the loss of photographs resulting from camera malfunction, accidents in development, or film lost in the mail. You may also want to include a "Model Release" which will give you the right to use any photo as samples for advertising purposes. SETTING YOUR FEE Make certain the bride completely understands what your fee is. and what she will receive in return. There are various ways you can price weddings: 1) Offer a complete package that includes an engagement photo for the newspaper, formal bridal portrait, and coverage of the rehearsal party, wedding and reception. 2) Coverage of the rehearsal party, wedding and reception 3) Wedding and reception 4) Wedding only Weddings can be a goldmine. It's not uncommon for a complete package that includes an 8x10 album for the bride, and a 4x5 album for each of the parents to run $1,000 or more. Many photographers set a minimum charge of $500 for weddings. Even if you only did two weddings per weekend at the minimum charge, you could easily make $52,000 per year. The complete weeding package per week would earn you over $100,000 per year. That's working one day per week! Now imagine how much money you could earn working full time. OTHER FREELANCE JOBS THAT CAN MAKE BIG MONEY! DANCE SCHOOL RECITALS: Dance recitals are only once a year, but taking photographs of beautiful children in their costumes can mean increasing you bank account substantially. Dance schools are everywhere and they come in all sizes. By offering a photo package of 18x10, 25x7s, 4wallet photos, and 15x7 class photo, you can make anywhere from $1,000 for the smallest classes, up to $5,000 for a class of 400500 students. If you make the teachers responsible for posing the students, and offer one pose per child, you can process the largest classes in just a few days. CHILDREN'S SPORTS PHOTOS: Children's sports, such as Little League baseball, football, hockey, soccer, and basketball offer a very profitable opportunity to make fast cash for freelance photographer. Every team (and the hundreds of parents in the stands) all want group shots and individual photos of every player. Most leagues will have at least 810 teams, with up to 30 children on a team, depending on the sport. The person to approach for working out arrangement for a photographer session may be the coach, a director, committee, or sponsor. Dealing with one person works best. Check with the city or county recreation department. They will know who is using their facilities. REAL ESTATE & ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY Some of your best clients can be real estate agents, residential and commercial contractors, and architects. Real estate agents know that photographs are more effective in advertising a home or business than the typical classified ad. Doing all of a real estate agency's listings can add substantially to your income. INSURANCE PHOTOGRAPHY Insurance companies will reimburse a policy holder only for those items they have documented. increasingly, insurance adjusters are urging clients to photograph everything that's covered by their policy on their home or business. It's difficult to argue with a photographic inventory and for that reason people will way you to photograph their possessions and file them away in a safety deposit box. FAMILY PORTRAITS When you take family portraits it's best if you don't use a studio. people always act and look more natural in their own homes or yards. Family pets are also easier to include when they are in familiar surroundings. You can promote your "on location" family portrait service in the Sunday newspaper. Note the fact that they won't even have to leave the comfort and privacy of their home, because you will come to them. Charge an initial fee, which includes the first portrait (16x20 and 20x24 are not uncommon) plus travel expenses and other shooting costs. Always promote the Christmas card portraits, which the labs offer. CHURCHES & SYNAGOGUES When church members become old enough to become regular members they are confirmed and officially admitted to the church. Churches usually want group shots of the entire class plus individual photos for each family. A Bar mitzvah in the Jewish faith is similar to confirmation. When a boy turns thirteen, he becomes a recognized member of his religion and the synagogue in a ceremony. With a confirmation and bar mitzvah are joyous occasions and are followed by a reception for family, friends, and religious members. ANIMAL SHOWS & PET PORTRAITS Pets and animals add up to a multibillion dollar business in America. What animal and pet owners spend every year on food, grooming, petsitting, petwalking, health products, and accessories is staggering. Offer your services as a pet and animal photographer and they will buy that also. There are freelance photographers who make a good living just going from show to another that features horses,cats and dogs. Get in touch with your local veterinarian who should be able to provide you with the names and addresses of sponsors for the various shows and organizations. ANTIQUE DEALERS & AUCTIONEERS Some large antique dealers have photos taken of their items for sale, and send the photos or color slides of special or unusual pieces to other dealers or customers. When auctioneers are hired to auction off items for an estate, bankruptcy, a large business or industry, or any other large job that has valuable items on their list of sale items, they will often use color slides for TV ads, brochures, and other promotional pieces. GOLF COURSES & COUNTRY CLUBS You can make some fast cash by making arrangements with a golf course or country club to have action photos taken of golfers when they hold tournaments and there is a crowd. Set up your camera on the first tee for foursome shots and action shots as each player swings. PONY & CHILD PHOTOS Back in the 1940s and 50s photographers would travel the country and go door to door. For a fee, children could put on cowboy hat, vest and chaffs, and climb onto a saddle less pony to have their picture taken. All you have to do is rent a gentlenatured pony, have a three piece (1size fits all children) cowboy outfit, and an assistance standing by just in case the pony gets skittish, or the child decides to jump off. Then make arrangements to appear at crazy days festivals, school carnivals, family reunions, shopping mall promotions, parades, or any other place where crowds gather. PHOTOGRAPHING SCHOOL & COMMUNITY BANDS Make arrangements with the band director or booster club and make arrangements to take color group photos of the band and individual members. Mail sample prints to band directors outside your area and arrange for appointments to show your work and explain package offers and fees. GRADUATION PHOTOS Contact the senior class advisor and make arrangements to take graduation photos of seniors in their caps and gowns as they practice before the actual graduation ceremony. If you don't have a portable background, use the stage curtains. Borrow a diploma from the school that each graduate can hold. YOUR MONEY GUIDE TO FREE GOVERNMENT GRANTS Anyone thinking about going into business for themselves, or wanting to expand an existing business should rush for the world's largest "onestepmoneystop" where FREE MONEY to start or expand a business is being held for you by the Federal Government. It sounds absolutely incredible that people living right here in the United States of America wouldn't know that each year the world's largest source of free business help delivers: * Over $30 billion dollars in free grants and low interest loans; * Over onehalf trillion dollars in procurement contracts; * Over $32 billion dollars in FREE consulting and research grants. With an economy that remains unpredictable, and a need for even greater economic development on all fronts, the federal government is more willing than ever before to give you the money you need to own your own business and become your own boss! In spite of the perception that people should not look to the government for help, the great government giveaway programs have remained so incredibility huge if each of the approximately 8 million businesses applied for an equal share, they would each receive over $70,000. Most people never apply for a FREE GRANT because they somehow feel it isn't for them, there's too much redtape, or simply don't know who to contact. The fact is however, that people from all walks of life do receive FREE GRANT MONEY and other benefits from the government, and you should also. HOW TO FIND FUNDING SOURCES WORTH BILLIONS As with all grant seeking, the key to obtaining grants is preparation and knowledge about funding sources. Preparation means identifying programs that are available, and determining if you fall within their restrictions. The following sources will be invaluable to you in locating thousands of sources of FREE MONEY FEDERAL REGISTER This daily publication contains changes, proposed changes, and notices about rules and regulations affecting all government agencies and their programs. Federal agencies must publish the program description, eligibility requirements, and program guidelines in the Federal Register. For current subscription costs write to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, Dc 20402. CATALOG OF FEDERAL DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE This publication lists a complete description of every program in the federal government that makes funds available to private business. Write to the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. COMMERCE BUSINESS DAILY This publication contains a daily listing of U.S. Government procurement invitations, contract awards, subcontracting leads, sales of surplus property, and foreign business opportunities. For current annual subscriptions costs write to the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, Dc 20402. THE FOUNDATION left 888 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10019, will provide you with a listing of philanthropic foundations. FREE FEDERAL MONEY GIVEN AWAY TO ASSIST BUSINESSES GRANT MONEY FOR BUSINESSES IN POOR ECONOMIC AREAS Contact the Economic Adjustment Division, Director, Economic development Administration, Herbert Hoover Bldg.,Rm. H7217, Washington, DC 20230. GRANT MONEY FOR MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Grants are awarded up to $2 million dollars to stimulate business growth. Contact the Minority Business development Agency, department of Commerce, Washington, DC 20230. FREE MONEY TO PROVIDE ASSISTANCE TO ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED BUSINESSES Management and technical assistance is provided free to disadvantaged business. Contact the Associate Administrator for Small Business, 1441, L Street, NW, Rm. 602, Washington, DC 20416. GRANT MONEY FOR INVESTORS IN RENTAL APARTMENT BUILDINGS WHO ARE IN FINANCIAL TROUBLE Contact the Chief, Program Support Branch, Management Operations Division, Office of MultiFamily Housing Management, department of Housing and Development, Washington, DC 20420. GRANT MONEY FOR WOMEN'S ENTERPRISES Up to $200,000 dollar grants are awarded to women in business annually. Contact the Grants Management Office, Small Business Administration, 1441 L Street, NW, Washington, DC 20416 GRANT MONEY FOR REAL ESTATE INVESTORS WHO RENT TO ELDERLY OR HANDICAPPED PEOPLE Contact the Director, Office of MultiFamily Housing Management, Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC 20410. GRANT MONEY FOR INDIANOWNED BUSINESSES Contact the Office of Indian Services Director, Bureau of Indian Affairs, 18th & C Streets, NW, Rm. 4600, Washington, DC 20240. FREE STATE GRANT MONEY There simply isn't enough room in this report to begin listing all the FREE MONEY programs that are available from the federal and state governments. We can tell you however, the general types of programs that are available and where to begin. As you contact different agencies for grant money, learn not to accept "no" as a final answer. There are so many new programs being offered each year that often an agency's own employees won't be aware they are offering the one you ask about. If being persistence doesn't help, get in touch with your Congressman and let them track down a program that meets your needs. TYPES OF PROGRAMS THROUGH STATE & FEDERAL AGENCIES FREE MONEY Usually through direct grants that do not have to be paid back. BUSINESS CONSULTING Free management advice is offered on almost every business subject by the Department of Economic Development to minimize new business startup management costs. BUSINESS SITE SELECTION State hired specialists are available to assist new entrepreneurs select the best possible location for their new business. MANAGEMENT TRAINING Most states will assign specialists to work with a new business with oneonone management training. EMPLOYEE TRAINING ASSISTANCE This program provides FREE MONEY to train employees. FREE MONEY is also available to send employees to school. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT GRANTS FREE MONEY is available to attract hightech related companies. PROGRAM CONSULTANTS States have highly trained management consultants who will locate Federal Grant Programs to help you through the application process. FORMS & DOCUMENTS State professionals will help a new business owner apply for permits, licenses, or any other legal document a business may require. VENTURE CAPITAL FINANCING This method can provide FREE MONEY in the sense you wouldn't have to pay it back. You would, however, probably have to give up part of the ownership of your business in order to receive financing. Most states have their own venture capital finance firms that invest in high risk businesses. MINORITIES & WOMEN FREE MONEY grants are available in most states for women or minorities who want to start a business. LOW INTEREST LOANS A state may raise money through industrial revenue bonds to buy your fixedassest equipment. The public, which invest in these bonds, do not pay taxes on the earned interest. When a low interest loan is granted, the state does not guarantee that investors will get their money back if the business fails. If a state issues a general obligation bond, a public investment is then guaranteed. the states will also make direct loans at low interest, or even cosign a commercial bank loan. If a state cosigns a loan for you, it may subsidize your interest and reduce an already lowinterest rate lower yet. SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT leftS Every state has Small Business development lefts who can match you with the right FREE MONEY grant program. All development lefts offer free counseling to anyone wishing to start or expand a business. Their services are varied but include; FREE seminars, workshops, business planning, feasibility studies, marketing research, management analysis, sales technique, financing, exporting, inventory control, accounting, record keeping, and grant application. Whatever your questions about FREE MONEY grants or starting a business, refer to your telephone directory under State Offices and contact your Small Business development left. GETTING FREE MONEY FROM VENTURE CAPITAL SOURCES A venture capital company is another source for FREE MONEY in financing your business plans. But since they are willing to assume some risk by investing in your business, they also expect some equity in the business itself. Venture capital companies invest in projects they feel will be successful and bring a return on their investment. If you are interested in asking a venture capital company to invest in your business refer to your telephone directory under Venture Capital Companies or Investment Companies, and contact those who are in the same area you want to start your project in. SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Small business investment companies can provide your business with the capital it needs by; 1) giving you a free loan; 2) making a stock investment in your business; or 3) offering a combination of the two. Small business investment companies are in the business of making money just like any other business. The biggest difference between them and another investor is: 1) They are privately managed firms who are licensed and partially financed by the federal government's Small Business Administration. 2) All of its transactions are regulated by the government. 3) Their success depends on the growth and profits of companies they own stock in. They often give money in exchange for stocks. 4) Their loans usually carry lower interest rates than commercial banks. 5) Straight loans repayments are carried over a longer period of time. 6) Most businesses are eligible, especially if they are 50% minority owned. For a complete listing of the thousands of Small Business Investment Companies, visit your local library and ask for the SBIC Catalog. Study the catalog and note the companies that specialize in your area of interest. Then write them and request more information on what they have to offer. WRITING A SUCCESSFUL GRANT APPLICATION To write a successful grant application for FREE MONEY it should be well planned. You should be familiar with exactly how a particular agency prefers to have their grant proposals completed. If you have no experience in writing grant proposals, this is another area where your Small Business development lefts can help. WORK CLOSELY WITH THE FREE MONEY GRANTOR AGENCY Once you decide which government agency you want FREE MONEY from, contact them and ask for a grant application. Get to know some of the grantor agency personal. Experts love to talk about their programs, so ask for advice, suggestions, and criticisms about your proposed project. In most cases, the more the agency knows about your grant proposal, the better your chances will be of getting support from the personnel who ultimately approve your FREE MONET request. Often it is to the grantor's advantage to send their grant proposal summary to an agency official they have developed a contact relationship with, and ask them to review and return it to you with their comments. Be certain this approach is acceptable with your agency. You wouldn't first want a first draft mistakenly processed before it was finished. Making a personal visit to the agency's office in your area is also important. Face to face contact will help you understand eligibility requirements, deadlines, maximum FREE MONEY amounts you can apply for, and other details you want to know about. You can also utilize an agency's library and determine through books, brochures, and conversation if there are other agencies you could apply for FREE MONEY. there is nothing that says that you can't apply for, two three, or more FREE MONEY grants at one time! ESTABLISH YOUR OWN PROFESSIONAL NETWORK Do some networking and maintain continuous contact with people who can gather information for you about FREE MONEY GRANTS. Nothing can be substituted for personal contact with the decision makers who are in charge of grant programs. Learn to use your personal influence (and theirs) to achieve your goals. The US. Government Printing Office maintains a wealth of information that people never take advantage of! Write to them and ask for a copy of the "U.S. Government Directory" and ask for a list of books, brochures, and documents that covers your field of interest. Tell them you are especially interested in obtaining information about FREE FEDERAL MONEY that's available to private citizens.Remember, "FREE FEDERAL MONEY" doesn't mean you have to travel to Washington, DC. It just means finding out where the agencies are within your own state and local government. 21 STEPS TO HOME BUSINESS SUCCESS Twenty million homebased businesses will be in operation by 1999, according to Link Resource's 1995 National Workat Home Survey. All around the country, people who want more control over their lives are starting home businesses In New Orleans, Rick Hart's home based cajun Cargo ships seafood nation wide. In Palatine, Illinois, Stephaine Heavey works from home designing and selling original patterns for fabric dolls. And in Dallas, Lisa McElya published the Dallas Party & Event Planners Guidebook from the entire first floor of her twostory home. These three people are living the new American dream of owning a business, but avoiding the high overhead and startup costs of a commercial location. If the idea of working from home is appealing, but you don't know where to begin, here is a stepbystep guide. STEP #1 DECIDE WHAT PART OF THE HOUSE TO USE Select an area away from family activity. The perfect space is a separate room (or perhaps the garage), but any area will do, if it can hold all the business supplies and equipment, and also provide enough work space for desks, tables, or counters. STEP #2 DETERMINE HOW MUCH TIME YOU CAN SPEND ON THE BUSINESS Many people start a home business on a parttime basis while raising children or working outside the home. Others start fulltime when family and finances allow. However you begin, figure out how may hours per week you can devote to the business Make a weekly chart of your activities, examine it, and determine where the business fits. Don't assume you have time and find out later you don't. STEP #3 DECIDE ON THE TYPE OF BUSINESS Make a list of things you like to do, your work and volunteer experience, and items you own that can be used in a business. Look over this lineup, and using ideas from it, list possible businesses to start. Eliminate any business that isn't appealing or doesn't fill a need people have. For ideas on different types of businesses, consult the end of this article. Other ideas can be found in the source material listed at the end of this article. STEP #4 CHOOSE A LEGAL FORM The three basic legal forms are sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation. The most common is the sole proprietorship. As its name implies, a sole proprietorship is owned by one individual. It is the oldest form of business, the easiest to start, and the least complicated to dissolve. Here are some of the advantages of this business form: 1. You own all the profits 2. Your business is easy and cheap to organize. You don't need any government approval, although you may be required to carry a city, state or county license. Your only other obligation is to notify the Internal revenue Service (IRS) for the purposes of sales tax. 3. You're the boss 4. You enjoy certain tax savings. You must pay regular individual taxes on your income, property, and payroll, but these are not levied as special taxes, as with a corporation. You will also have to pay sales tax which you have received from your customers. 5. Greater personal incentive and satisfaction. Since you have your investment to lose if your business is not successful, you should be more willing to put time, thought, and energy into the business. And when your business is successful, you enjoy maximum sense of accomplishment since you know its success was dependent upon your decisions about your management ability alone. For more information about this and other forms of business, send for the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) Publication MP25. Selecting the Legal Structure for Your Business (50 cents). It outlines the advantages and disadvantages of each legal type of structure. If after reading it you are still uncertain what form of the business should take, consult an attorney. STEP #5 DETERMINE WHERE THE MONEY WILL COME FROM There are three ways to finance startup costs: use your own money, obtain a loan, or find investors. If possible, it is better to start small, use your savings, and not worry about repaying a debt. also keep in mind that since you are a homebased, chances of qualifying for a loan or finding investors are slim until the success of your idea is proven. STEP #6 GATHER INFORMATION Spend a few weeks researching homebased businesses. A library or bookstore can provide numerous books on business basics, and on the specific type of business that interest you. Homemade Money by Barbara Brabee (see sources) is an excellent book to start with. If you are considering a computer business, get in touch with the association of Electronics; Cottagers, P.O. Box 1738, Davis, CA 956171738. To keep informed of what is happening in home business world, contact National Home Business report, P.O. Box 2137, Naperville, IL 60566, for subscription information; and Mothers Home Business Network, P.O. Box 423, East Meadow, NY 11554 (send SASE for free information). STEP #7 CHECK ON ZONING RESTRICTIONS Find out how your property is zoned, the call City Hall and ask what regulations apply to home businesses in that zone. Also, if you rent or live in a condominium, check the lease or homeowner's association rules to be certain a home business is allowed. Generally, if you do not annoy your neighbors with excess noise, odors, and traffic, you will not be deterred from running a business at home. The neighbors may not even be aware of the business, but it is necessary to know exactly what you can and can't do before you start. This is important should any problems or questions arise later. STEP #8 PICK A BUSINESS NAME AND REGISTER IT If the business you choose is different form your name, file an assumed (or fictitious) name certificate with the county. You are notified if another business already has that name, so you can select a new one. Do this before investing in expensive stationery and brochures. It costs only a few dollars to file, and it protects the business name from being used by someone else in the county. STEP #9 WRITE A BUSINESS PLAN A good business plan clarifies your ideas and establishes a plan of action. A good business plan should include a description of what you are selling, your background and qualifications, who the prospective customers are and where they can be found, what is needed to build the business, how you plan to promote, and how much money is need for startup costs. SBA Publication #M925, The Business Plan for HomeBased Business ($1) is helpful. STEP #10 GET AN IDENTIFYING NUMBER If you are the sole proprietor of the business and have no employees, you may either use your Social Security number or an Employee Identification Number (EIN) as the business number on official forms. If you have employees, or the business is set up as a partnership or corporation, you must obtain an EIN. To do this, complete IRS Form SS4 (Application for Employer Identification Number) and file it with the nearest IRS left. STEP #11 OBTAIN A SALES TAX PERMIT If the product or service you sell is taxable, you need a state sales tax permit. Call the local tax agency, explain the type of business you have and what you sell, and ask if you need to collect sales tax. If you do, they will send you the necessary information and forms to complete. You also use this tax number when your purchase items for resale. STEP #12 OBTAIN LICENSES & PERMITS It's very important not to overlook any necessary license or permit. For example, some cities and counties require a general business license, and most have special laws regarding the preparation and sale of food. Call City Hall to find out what is need for your particular business. In addition, Chamber of Commerce provide information on city, county and state licenses and permits. STEP #13 SELECT BUSINESS CARDS, STATIONERY, BROCHURES Spend time on the color, design and paper for these items. They make a definite impressiongood or bad on the people who receive them. If you are not certain what is most suitable and effective, consult a graphics designer or a creative printer whose work you like. STEP #14 OPEN A BUSINESS CHECKING ACCOUNT Call several banks to find out what services they offer, and what minimum balance, if any, must be maintained to avoid paying a service charge. Also ask about credit card if you plan to offer this convenience to your customers. Bank fees can be significant, so shop around for the best deal. If your personal checking account is with a credit union, see if it can also provide a separate business account. when you open your account, you may need to show the assumed name certificate and business license. Finally, investigate obtaining a credit card in the business's name. If this is not possible, set aside a personal credit card to use for business expenses. STEP #15 SET UP RECORDKEEPING SYSTEMS Put together a simple and effective bookkeeping system with an 8 1/2 x 11" threering binder, columnar pad sheets and twelve pocket dividers from the office supply store. For each month, set up columnar sheets for income and expenses. Use a pocket divider for each month's receipts, bank statement, deposit tickets, and canceled checks. In addition, an automobile log for business mileage, and filing system for correspondence, invoices, supplier catalogs, client records, etc. are two other useful tools. For more information on recordkeeping, see IRS publication #583, Information for Business taxpayers. STEP #16 CHECK IRS REQUIREMENTS If you comply with basic IRS guidelines, you can deduct a percentage of normal household expenses (mortgage, interest, taxes, insurance, utilities, repairs, etc.) as a business expense. see the box accompanying this article and, for more detailed information, IRS publication #587, Business Use of the Home. Also become familiar with these IRS forms: Schedule SE (compensation of Social Security SelfEmployment Tax) and Schedule 1040 ES (estimated Tax for Individuals). Depending on circumstances, you may have to file them. STEP #17 OUTFIT THE BUSINESS Make a list of everything needed to start the business, but before you buy anything, look around the house for things you already own that are usable. When you are ready to start purchasing, check the classified ads and garage sales. Both are good, inexpensive sources for office furniture, typewriters, computers, answering machines, etc. But only what is absolutely necessary for startup, and wait until the business is off the ground to get the extras. STEP #18 DECIDE ON TELEPHONE REQUIREMENTS Call the telephone company to find out the cost of a business phone in your area. If you cannot afford a separate business line, investigate the telephone company's regulations on using your personal phone in a business. It may be possible to do this if you follow certain guidelines. Keep a record of long distance business calls as they are a deductible expense. Finally, consider the benefits of an answering machine to catch calls when you are out. STEP #19 CHECK OUT THE POST OFFICE & UPS Using a post office box as the business address down plays the fact you are homebased. It also prevents customers from dropping in at all hours. While looking into box rental, ask for information on the various postal rates, particularly bulk rate, if you plan to do large or specialized mailings. If you mail many packages, check out United Parcel Service (UPS), as it is less expensive than the Post Office. STEP #20 PURCHASE THE NECESSARY INSURANCE Check with your homeowners insurance agent about a rider for your existing policy or the need for a separate business policy. Also make sure you have adequate personal and product liability coverage. Shop around, as each company has different rules regarding home businesses To save money on medical insurance, join an association and participate in their group plan. One such body is The National association for the SelfEmployed: they can be reached at 8005275504. STEP #21 ORGANIZE THE HOUSE & YOURSELF To have more time for business, organize and simplify household routines. Start by holding a garage sale to get rid of unnecessary possessions. Next, have a family conference and divide household duties, making sure each person does his or her part. The, set up a planning notebook to keep track of appointments, things to do, calls to make, errands to run, shopping, etc. Finally, set up a work schedule so you won't get sidetracked by TV, neighbor's visits, snacking, and telephone calls. Creating and operating a home business is a wonderful and rewarding challenge. The satisfaction is not only in the money earned, but in doing what makes you happy. SOURCES SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. Pamphlets mentioned in this article are available by calling the nearest SBA office or ordering from SBA, P.O. Box 15434, Ft. Worth, TX 76119. NEWSLETTERS HOMEWORKING MOTHERS. Mothers' Home Business Network, dept. 106, P.O. Box 423. East Meadow, NY 11554: sample available for $2 and SASE. NATIONAL HOME BUSINESS REPORT, Barbara Brabec Productions, Dept 106, P.O. Box 2137, Naperville, IL 60588; $18/year, quarterly. (Sample issue, $4.00) BOOKS, REPORTS ELECTRONIC COTTAGE HANDBOOK #2 MAKING $$ WITH YOUR HOME COMPUTER by Lisa Fleming. Fleming, Ltd., P.O. Box 1738, Davis, CA 956171738; $7.00 ppd. HOMEMADE MONEY by Barbara Brabec, Barbara Brabec Productions, P.O. Box 2137, Naperville, IL 60566; $16.95 "BUSINESS @ HOME PROFIT REPORT" - Free Subscription for 3 stamps or $1. Infopreneur, Box 96, Dept K18, Purdy, MO 65734-0096. THE #1 HOME BUSINESS BOOK by George and Sandra Delany. Liberty Publishing Co. Inc., Dept 106, 50 Scott Adam Rd., Cockeysville, MD 21030; $4.95. THE COMPLETE WORKATHOME DIRECTORY AND IDEA BOOK. E.A. Morgan Publishing Co.,Dept. 106, P.O. Box 1375, Huntington, NY 11743; $15. (Includes free report: " The Legalities and Tax Advantages In a Home Business.") THE WORKATHOME SOURCEBOOK by Lynie Arden. Live Oak Publications, Dept. 106, 6003 N. 51st Street, Suite 106, Boulder, CO 80301; $13.95 STAY HOME AND MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS by Jo FrohbieterMueller. Betterway Publications, Box 219, Crozet, VA 22932; $11.45 101 BEST BUSINESSES TO STAR by Sharon Kahn & The Philip Lief Group (Doubleday, 1983, $19.85). Many of the businesses profiled are suitable for running at home. ASSOCIATIONS AMERICAN HOME BUSINESS ASSOCIATION, 60 Arch St.,Greenwich, CT 06830. NATIONAL ALLIANCE OF HOMEBASED BUSINESS WOMEN, Dept. 106, P.O. Box 95, Norwood, NJ 07648; $30 annual membership. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE COTTAGE INDUSTRY, Dept. 106 P.O. Box 14850, Chicago, IL 60614; $45 membership. MAKE $600 A DAYEVERY DAY AS A VIDEOGRAPHER We've seen a lot of new hitech developments come into our lives during the past several years: The home computer, word processor, electronic typewriter...and how in the world did we ever get along without the ever popular VCR? One of the major products on the scene, of course, is the video camera, also known as the camcorder. The camcorder is to video what the tape recorder was to audio when it was popularized back in the early 50s. The major difference between the two, aside from the obvious functions, is the price. The audio tape recorder, first introduced at a price of just a couple of hundred dollars (now as low as $19.95 for some smaller cassette recorders) can't compare to the high price of the camcorder which goes for $1,400 to $4,000. At these prices, the camcorder is certainly not a toy or novelty that the average person wants to own. It's an expensive, complex instrument that only comparatively few people want to buy because, let's face it, it's use is somewhat limited to occasional happenings or special events. It's not something a person would use every day. This combination, however, is what makes the camcorder a fabulous potential money making marvel: LIMITED USE AND HIGH COST! Yes, you can start a business with a camcorder and enjoy a hefty income of hundreds of dollars daily...many thousands of dollars annually. And...you can operate right from your own home, at least using your home as a base operation, the actual business being conducted "in the field." How can you become a Videographer, and in what areas? HERE ARE A FEW IDEAS THAT ARE MAKING BIG MONEY FOR OTHER VIDEOGRAPHERS: * Weddings * Tournaments * Birthday parties * Conference speakers * Anniversary parties * Local bands & musicians * Bar mitzvah * Special dances * Graduations * Sporting events * Ceremonies * Newborn babies * Christmas parties * New Years parties These are just some of the opportunities in videographing. The possibilities are limited only by your imagination, the area in which you live, the events going on around you. Why is this such a lucrative business? For one thing, because it gives them a permanent VIDEO RECORD of something that's happening in their lives..which they can see over and over again on their TV by playing the tape through their VCR . What couple wouldn't love to have a recording of their wedding to show their children in 10 to 15 years? What aspiring singer or rock band wouldn't want a video tape of their performance for their families and friends...and as a VIDEO RESUME to help them get additional engagements? Consider things that will never happen again: A graduation, sports tournament, newborn baby, and important speech, a bar mitzvah. These are oneshots that can never be repeated...but they can be captured on video tape to be relived again and again! CAPITAL INVESTMENT Yes, there is an investment involved in getting started, but it's a cost that can repay itself many times over. The primary investment will be for the camcorder. There are relatively cheap models on the market priced from around $800 but these are not recommended. Since this is not for pleasure, but for business, you should consider getting one of the best that money can but, and that means an investment of at least $2,000. Some models are priced higher, depending on the features you want. You will also need accessories such as a light kit. LEARN BEFORE YOU EARN Maybe you know all about camcorders. Maybe you already own one, or at least have had the opportunity of using one. But we'll assume neither of these is true. We'll assume you don't know the first thing about them, what they can and cannot do, or how to turn the darn thing on. If so, visit your local public library and ask for books on the subject. Spend a few nights reading up on the subject. Next, check your local colleges and high schools. They usually offer night classes on videotaping that are quite reasonable in cost and you can learn everything necessary in just a few classes. Only the basics are necessary to learn. Most of your education will come from practical use of the video marvel on the job or in your own practice sessions. Video taping is not unreasonably complicated, so the learning process need not concern you at all. Remember how complicated driving a car seemed to be before you learned how? Today it's like a second nature to you. The same will be true of using the camcorder. TEST BEFORE YOU INVEST This will probably be music to your ears: You don't have to invest thousands of dollars in your new equipment UNTIL you are sure you will be able to make the business work for you. For your first few jobs you can RENT the equipment from a video store. The rental fee is about $50 for a 24 hour period, a little more or less, depending on your area. With a rental camera, you can go out on your first job (or first couple of jobs) and test the waters, see if you like doing it. See if you can do a good job that will satisfy your clients. The best way to begin, in fact, is to do a job for a friend or relative. You can either give them a nice discount or even do the entire job for free, just to get the experience. It should be worth the rental fee and your time to get some needed experience in the field where the action is. You can learn from any mistakes you make and not feel too guilty or obligated, especially if they are paying less or nothing at all. You will find that your best advertising will come from wordofmouth; one person recommending you to a friend...and that friend giving your name to another, and so on. You don't even have to pay for this kind of advertising, and it can really multiply your assignments. When word gets around that you have good video equipment, really know your stuff, do a great job and your prices are reasonable...your phone will probably start ringing off the wall. PERFECT HOME BASED BUSINESS With this type of business you don't need a fancy showroom, store or outside office. You can set up an office right in your own home. Naturally you will need a telephone and an answering machine would be a good addition. You don't want to miss incoming calls. You might want to invest a few extra dollars in business cards, letterheads and envelopes, also statements for billing clients. All printed matter should cost no more than $100. PRICING YOUR SERVICE One of the main obstacles in beginning a new business, especially a service such as Videographing, is how to charge clients. Priced too high and you'll get no business; priced too low and you'll make no money. Here's the best way to arrive at a fair and profitable price: 1. Check around to see if anyone else is offering a video taping service in your area. If so, find out their prices and keep this (or these) figures in mind when tabulating your own. 2. Determine how much time will be needed to do each job. Figure that your time should be worth $50 to $75 an hour. Don't let those figures throw you; remember you are not a salaried employees, but an independent business person with no paid vacations, no health insurance or other extras. You get paid for your work and for the time it takes to do the job, excluding travel expenses. 3. Now figure in the travel time and transportation necessary to arrive at the job. Add at least 50 cents a mile within a 25 mile radius. 25 cents a mile for distant jobs. 4. Figure the cost of renting or purchasing equipment on a percentage basis. 5. Add the cost of any help or assistance required for each job. 6. Now include the cost of any tape editing that may be requested, also copies of each tape that maybe requested for family and friends of your client. Determine editing on a time basis; copies on a time plus cost of each tape. Since this is YOUR business, you want to be flexible and provide a few of these extra free or a greatly reduced prices. For instances, if you're well treated and you really like the people you're working for, you might want to give them an extra copy of finished tape FREE. This is a good will gesture that can only work in your favor in the long run. Of course, occasionally you might run across someone who is impossible to please, finding fault with everything you try to do for them. In this case, all prices will apply. PRODUCING INCOME Once you get rolling in this business, you can set up appointments on a daily schedule. If you arrange 3 jobs per day, each averaging $75 per hour (plus extras as indicated) and each job averages two hours...this should give you $600 per day. That's $3,000 income from an average five day work week. If you want to take additional jobs Saturdays and Sundays, you might want to adjust your prices upward for this weekend work. On the other hand, if you seem to have slow day during the week (monday for instance) you can offer a discount to fill the gap and get additional business for this offday. ADDITIONAL INCOME IDEAS This could be just the tip of the Videographing iceberg, because there are many other ways to cash in on this type of business. One man developed a "Welcome Channel" idea and sold it to local hotels and motels. On an unused TV channel he showed a video on closed circuit of various stores, shops and activities and events in and around his area. He went to local merchants and offered to make commercials on video tape which would be then shown on his "Welcome Channel." What are others doing in Videographing? Here are a few ideas to get you thinking: Produce a series on howto tapes hiring professionals in a specific field and tape him/her doing the job. This could be a mechanic showing how to tune a car's engine; a cook or baker; an electrician showing how to wire a home; a plumber; a carpenter, etc., each doing what he or she does best, showing the layman how to do a specific job. This has great possibilities for those who don't like to read books or just don't have the time. Much more can be learned in far less time by SEEING it being done by a professional then if it had to be read, analyzed and digested from a book. Think about it. The opportunities are just beginning in the field of Videographing, and the income potential can be astounding. Remember: Whatever ideas you can come up with for producing on video tape can be offered to video rental stores and other stores on a commission basis. This can mean a nice additional income above and beyond your Videographing business. HOW TO PROVIDE A TYPESETTING SERVICE. Suppose you're new to mail order, and you want to put your ads into the many ad sheets, tabloids and publications you're seeing in your mail box everyday. The only problem is, you don't HAVE any ads! Here's where a typesetting service comes into play. Typesetting isn't as hard as it sounds. It's just a glorified name for making a clean, clear ad. If you have a computer, you can produce professional quality typesetting easily and quickly. However, typesetting can even be done with a regular typewriter. If you are going to typeset with a typewriter, you should first visit your local office supply store and pick up a carbon ribbon for your typewriter (it prints darker and more evenly than a nylon ribbon), some rubon transfer letters and borders in different sizes (don't worry if they're big, I'll talk about that later), a "nonphoto blue" pencil (which doesn't show up when photocopied) and a book or two of mailorder or business related clip art. You should be able to get all this for $15 or less. Next, put ads in ad sheets and other publications for your typesetting service. Observe what other typesetters are charging and be competitive. You should probably expect to get $1  $3 per inch. This doesn't sound like much, but the work is easy, and you will be doing other things besides just typesetting, as you will see later in this report. Typesetting should be offered as an "addon" service, best in connection with your own ad sheet. Your customers will be providing the ad copy, so all you have to do is arrange it. Usually, around 35 words will fit into a oneinch ad, leaving room for a border and a piece of clip art. Here's sample wording for an ad: "PROFESSIONAL TYPESETTING  Get your ad typeset and mailed to 1000 hungry buyers! $5/inch (35 words max.), $1 each additional inch. You get 15 cameraready proofs FREE! Send payment & 2 first class stamps to: (Your name and address)." What you will be doing here is typesetting the ad, inserting it into one of your adsheets, and sending the customer 10 extra copies of their ad, along with as many of your other offers as you can for 2 stamps. You may be giving the typesetting for free, based on your ad sheet rates, but it's worth it, as this is a great way to get new ads, as well as new customers. So, here's how to typeset a oneinch ad. First, don't worry about trying to fit everything into one inch! That's right. Make it twice the size it will be when printed. This gives you more room to work with, plus it will be a better quality when reduced to one inch on a photocopier (that's the trick!). For a oneinch ad, make a 2 inch tall by 4 1/4 inch wide border on a piece of white paper with your rubon borders. Next, make a light guideline with the blue pencil for the headline. Use rubdown letters of the appropriate size to make the headlines, being careful to follow the guideline to keep everything straight. Then, load the paper into your typewriter and neatly type the copy into the remaining space. If your typewriter will do extrabold words, use them to highlight important words in the ad, as well as the name and address. When you type the ad, leave a bit of space on one side for an appropriate piece of clip art. Cut the clip art from the book, and using either rubber cement, "spraymount" glue or clear, nonshiny tape, attach it to the ad. Use liquid paper to cover any specks or smears on the ad. Then, reduce it 50% on a photocopier. You've just typeset an ad! You should always offer extra copies of the ad to your customers. So, make five copies of the ad, cut them out, and place them straight face down on the copier glass. Make two copies of that, cut out the ads from the copies, and you have fifteen copies to send your customer, plus the original to put in your own adsheet. If you have a computer, it can be much easier, especially if you have a laser printer and a good graphics program or word processor. Use your graphics program to do the layout steps above. You can add clipart in the computer, or manually, after printing the ad. You won't have to worry about reducing the ad on a photocopier, as you can do that within your graphics program. Plus, printing extra copies is a snap. Most graphics programs will let you "copy and stamp," which means making a copy of what you have made (your ad), and stamping it elsewhere on the screen. Hence, you can make your fifteen copies all on one page and print them once, quickly and easily. And, your typesetting will look superprofessional! For more information on exactly how to do this, send $8 to Pat Flanagan Publishing & Design, 540 Imus, Mishawaka, IN 46545 and ask for the "MailOrder Computer" report. You'll also find out the best system setup to get, if you don't already have a computer. Remember how I asked for two first class stamps in my sample ad? That gives you plenty of "envelope space" for your other offers and ad sheets. You should be sure to include a copy of the ad sheet your customer's ad appears in, so they can be assured you delivered on your promises. Offering typesetting will get customers who are new to mail order, as well as seasoned professionals who don't want to bother with doing their own ads. It will also expand the number of people who get your ad sheets and offers. HOW TO START A PRINTING BUSINESS WITH NO EQUIPMENT Everyone in any business, especially mail order, needs printing. But being a printer takes huge, expensive printing presses, long hours and messy work, right? WRONG. YOU can make money without the mess and expense by being a PRINTING BROKER. A printing broker is, basically, an order taker for one or more commercial printers. You take orders for anything from business cards to circulars to large printing orders, take your agreed upon commission, then pass on the order to the printer. The printer then does the job and ships the order back to you or your customer, depending on your arrangements. Because the printer won't insert any of of his or her literature in with the job, YOU will get the return orders and commissions. You can even insert some of your circulars for your other products and services with the job, saving your mailing costs. Here's what you need to do... Prepare a letter explaining your desire to become a broker and mail it to all the printers in your area. The smaller printers seem to be the most likely to work well with you on this. Set up a time to meet with any printers who are interested. During this meeting, explain exactly what you will be doing (selling printing jobs by mail through advertisements in mail order publications). You won't have to explain much because almost all printers are familiar with brokering. Usually, you should be able to get a 20%  30% commission agreement, though it may depend upon the competition in your area between printers. You should be able to find printers interested in working with you, though, even those who already have brokers. Printing is a very competitive business and printers always want more work. So, you should have no trouble setting up connections. One good printer is all you need, though being set up with more than one may be an advantage (one may be cheaper for business cards than the other, who may be cheaper at single sheet printing). Try to get a price list of YOUR costs drawn up by each printer. This will help you if someone needs a price quote on a job. Also, you can check the mail order publications and see what other printers are charging. If you can undercut them and still keep a good margin (which you should be able to do, easily), you can make good money in this business. Another good idea... Instead of a commission, you may want to set up a "work account" with the printer, and get your printing done for free! Printers hate to have "down time," where their presses aren't printing anything. Work out an arrangement where you will have flyers, circulars, ad sheets or whatever, ready to be printed whenever the printer has down time. Turn over the full amount of orders you receive, instead of taking your commission, and get your printing done free during this down time! Most printers will be more than happy to take this arrangement, and you can get great benefits from it! Be sure your printer will be able to deliver QUALITY products ON TIME. These are the two biggest considerations to keep in mind when selecting a printer or printers to work with. Get samples of their previous work. Talk to them about the importance of being timely with the orders you bring in. Most printers will be understanding of your concerns, and will do their best to keep you happy, as you will be bringing in orders they otherwise wouldn't have. You have the capability to bring your local printer orders from across the country... building their business while building yours! Printing brokering is an easy way to expand your profits while expending little extra work. HOW TO PRODUCE AND SELL CLIP ART COLLECTIONS. Have you ever seen an ad in a publication that was just text? Just a big block of words. I'm sure you have, and wasn't it boring? If you're scanning quickly through ad sheets, your eye won't stop at a block of grey text. It'll skip right over. What you need to use to make your ad interesting and eyecatching is CLIP ART. Clip art is readytouse pictures, borders, headlines and other little pieces of art, printed in groups on a page, that you can clip out and use in your ads and publications. Clip art can be found at office supply stores, and from mail order dealers. Here's how you can get into the business of selling clip art. First, you need a source of clip art. If you, or a friend, are artistically inclined, draw your own. Don't worry about having to draw it small enough, you can reduce whatever you've drawn with a photocopier. It's a good idea to make your art relatively free of small details, since they'll get lost when you photocopy the picture. Draw items that would be useful in mail order ads (business related pictures, money, mail, etc.). Then, reduce them and assemble them on one page. You now have a product you can sell! Another source of clip art is other dealers. Many dealers sell copyrightfree clip art packages that you can resell, either for 100% profit or for a commission. The only drawback is it will be the same clip art that others are selling. That's ok, though, if you make sure to advertise it in places where other dealers aren't. Finally, if you own a computer, you have a wealth of clip art at your fingertips. Many graphics and signmaking software packages allow you to create your own graphics. These can be printed out and used as clip art. A laser printer will produce the best, professional quality clip art you'll ever see. One thing to make sure of is that the clip art you sell is copyrightfree. Otherwise you could find yourself in trouble. However, there are tons of copyrightfree clip art collections available from public domain software dealers and computer networks. Use your clip art collections as a way to expand your customer base and make a small profit. For example, you could use an ad like this: "100 pieces of professional quality clip art, and 50 ad frames and borders. Only $4 and two first class stamps. (Your name and address)." I'm sure you know by now what the two stamps are for, but in case you don't, they give you plenty of "envelope space" for your other offers. This way, the clip art is an enticement for customers to send for your other offers. Clip art collections can liven up drab, boring ads. They can also perk up your profit margins, and customer base! Be sure to use this easy business method in your own business! HOW TO MANUFACTURE AND SELL EMBOSSING KITS! An embossing kit is a novelty item used to emboss names in raised gold or silver lettering on books, cards, stationery, etc., with a beautiful effect. Looks expensive. Very simple to use, and it can be manufactured very simply and cheaply. All that is needed to emboss names in gold or silver is embossing powder, fusing ink, and an ordinary pen. In order to advertise your embossing kit, leave room to emboss a name in raised letters, such as "Joseph" or "Janice" so as to give it a personal effect, and the customer can see a sample of the work. Mix as follows: Embossing powder... 4 parts of finely powdered resin, 2 parts gold or silver bronzing powder... Mix well. Fusing ink... 1 part white syrup, 7 parts water, 1/2 teaspoon Lysol and enough coloring to see when writing. DIRECTIONS: Write with the fusing ink the name or names wanted, using the ink pen. Then the embossing powder is spread over the writing. Shake off the surplus. Now apply heat from an iron, toaster, or burner until the raised effect is seen. It's unbelievable! You can pack it in boxes or bottles and sell it for $1.00 to $2.00 per onehalf ounce. WOODWORKING PROFITS! If you are handy with table saws, wood lathes, and related equipment and woodworking tools, a lucrative business is the purchase, repair and resale of old furniture. We don't mean just davens or arm chairs. We're talking about everything from baby furniture and children's play equipment, to antique bedroom sets. You can pick up just about anything at garage sales, moving sales, yard sales, flea markets and sometimes find a bargain at a second hand store. Quite often you can clean out someone's attic or garage and take the "junk" as pay for your services. Strip and repaint the various furniture, tighten it up, change and modernize, do whatever is necessary to put it in good saleable condition with the least amount of time and expense. Advertise that you purchase old and broken down furniture on one side of the newspaper and on the other side your ad can detail the large choice of all types of tables, chairs, baby furniture, children's play things and other furniture and toys you have available at bargain prices. You can start out in your basement or garage, but eventually, as your business grows you may have to rent or buy a workshop and sales display area, or set up a retail outlet. After you become more experienced you can specialize only in those items that have the best market and make the most money per unit. Then when you grow large enough, distribute your works to various sales outlets on a distributorship or wholesale basis! HOW TO START A PICTURE FRAMING BUSINESS! This business can be started and operated within the comforts of home surroundings. You can start on a sturdy table or solid work bench in a small storage area, such as your garage, shed or basement; even a small room can be devoted toward this purpose. If you are handy with tools you could be on your way to a nice sideline business that could grow with time. Many wood mouldings can be bought at reasonable cost from lumber yards and can be used as the basic product for manufacturing frames. Everyone has photos and prized possessions which need framing. Many people don't like the plastic frames found in stores today, thus creating a ready market for beautiful, natural wood frames. Quite often you can find old, beautiful, rugged picture frames at rummage or garage sales. They can be repaired and cut down to today's standards. Good frames can add substantially to the value of art, paintings, posters, certificates, etc. The list is endless. No matter where you live you can start a picture framing business. To some, it can be an exciting and fascinating trade. With just a little experience and proper tools you can also learn to cut your own glass for the frames. You local library may be a great source of information on the subject. Also, in the various mailorder magazines you will find firms that offer free information on custom picture framing. Check out your local variety stores and others that handle picture frames and get ideas from what they have to offer. There are many variations and you may be able to dream up different and better designs. The frames may be sold locally or through the mail, and maybe even get you out of the everyday "rat race"! 16 IDEAS FOR LOWCOST PROMOTION Promotion and advertising can be a heavy expense, especially for a new business that wants to make itself known in a community. A homebased business, however, more often than not, has a very limited budget when it comes to advertising. The home business owner needs to make the public aware of his or her product or service at the lowest possible cost. There are many ways. A pet breeder in a large city was struggling for several yearsuntil he came up with a novel idea. He started giving away customized "birth certificates" for the pets he sold. Almost immediately, his sales rose more than 10 percent. The owner of a new home cleaning service was trying to attract clients. She couldn't afford much advertising, so she began offering "home cleaning seminars" to civic groups. After two months of seminars, she was swamped with inquiries and clients. Promotion often makes the crucial difference between business success and failure. Customers or clients must know about a business or product line before they'll buy and they must have a reason to buy. If you are trying to promote your business now, you can move in one of two directions: 1) You can take the conventional route to promotion and mount an elaborate media campaign, spending a considerable amount of money. 2) You can let your creative juices flow and mount a lowcost promotion effort, using a potpourri of attentiongetting gimmicks to bring your message to the buying public. Now, to be sure, conventional advertising is valuable. If your enterprise is large enough or if you're selling numerous product lines, you may find that a fullfledged media campaign is the most efficient and cost effective way to promote your business. If money is tight, however, or you're not sure you can amortize the heavy cost of a media campaign over a period of time, following is a assortment of lowcost techniques you can try. Not all may be appropriate for your particular business, and certainly it would be costly to try them all. But you're sure to find some ideas that will work for you. GIVEAWAYS. People love to receive "free" items, especially items they can use to gain knowledge or improve their lives. You can base and entire promotional campaign on this desire. If you're running a furniture repair business, for instance, you could give away a furniture repair brochure, free furniture planning guides, or color swatches. Once you begin giving away authoritative information customers will begin to perceive you as an expert in your field. NEWS CREATION. Want to get names and news from your business in the local newspaper? It may be easier that you think. If you don't have any news to report to the local media, create some. Maybe you've taken on a new associate. Or maybe you're selling an unusual product line. Or maybe you've opened a free advice left for the community. Or maybe you've received an award from a civic or professional group. Local Pennysavers and weekly are often quite interested in business news of this sort and can help you attract the attention of thousands of people. EVENTS. You may be able to attract the attention of the media or a crowd by staging a special promotional event. If you run a fitness classes, for instance, you could stage a celebrity instructor day. If you're promoting a new real estate business, you can offer tours of a model home in the area. If you're selling children's products and it's springtime, you can offer lunch with the Easter bunny. Get the idea? CHARITY TIEINS. Are you launching a new product? trying to increase visibility among a particular segment of your community? Offer your product to one or more local charities as a raffle prize or for use at a fund raising event. You'll receive lots of exposure among people who buy tickets or attend the event. CONTESTS. Offer a desirable or unique itemor even several itemsas contest prizes. First, find a contest theme that tiers into your business. A caterer might offer a quicheeating contest. A photographer might offer a young model contest. A mail order craft firm might offer an "Early American" handicrafts contest. Invite contest submissions and offer prizes to the winners. Do contests attract attention? You bet. All it takes is a few signs, a small press announcement or two, and the word will spread throughout the community grapevine. COMMUNITY SERVICE. Nothing brings you to the attention of the people fasteror more favorablythan community service. Ask yourself how your enterprise can be a "good neighbor" to your community. If you're running a lawn care and gardening service, perhaps you can offer one season's services at no charge to a needy charitable organization or nursing home in your area. Hundreds of people will hear about your work in the process. Volunteer for various community causes. If appropriate, you can step in during community emergency, offering products and services to help an organization or individuals in need. COUPONING. Americans are very couponconscious. Test the market: at what level will coupons increase the volume of various product or service lines? When you get some tentative answers, start distributing coupons that offer a discount on your services. Distribute them to area newspapers, on store counters, in doortodoor mail packets (which can often be quite inexpensive), at the public library, at laundromats, at any location where people congregate. BADGES AND NOVELTIES. You can easily and inexpensively produce badges, bumper stickers, book covers, and other novelty items for distribution in your area. You can imprint your business name and the first names of the customers on many of these products at little cost and distribute them for free. Or you can tie your novelty program into a contest: once a month, you can offer a prize to any individual whose car happens to carry one of your bumper stickers or badges with peeloff coupons, redeemable at your place of business. CELEBRITY VISITS. With a bit of persistence, you may be able to arrange to have a local media celebrity, public official, or entertainment personallyeven a fictitious cartoon character or clownvisit your service. The celebrity can sign autographs, read stories to children, perform cooking demonstrations, or perform any one of a hundred other trafficbuilding activities. CELEBRATE HOLIDAYS. You'll probably want to celebrate major public holidays with special sales. But celebrate some of the offbeat holidays as well. Almost every business has a few littleknown holidays. Ever hear of National Pickle Day, for instance? Or Cat Lovers Month? Once you find the "right" holiday, you can sponsor a special sale or special product arrange special media coverage of a holiday event. GO WHERE THE PEOPLE ARE. Can you open sales information booths at community fairs and festivals? This promotional technique can work for gift retailers, craftspeople, and personal service firms. If you have the people and the time, can you handle regional fairs or even trade shows? MAILING LISTS. Once you begin establishing a committed clientele, gather their names on a mailing list. Save the names from your mail orders and telephone inquiries. Eventually, you'll be able to send product circulars or even catalogs to the folks on your list and you'll be able to promise your products by mail. SCAVENGER HUNTS. If you want people to buy NOW, offer them an unbeatable deal. If they bring an old producta small appliance, a book, whateverto you, you'll give them a worthwhile discount on a comparable new item. Or stage a general purpose scavenger hunt. Customers who bring in three canned goods for your community's food bank will receive a discount on products purchased that day. PARTIES. Everyone loves a party. Why not celebrate the anniversary of your business or some special holiday by offering baked goods and beverages? If you're running a service business, perhaps you can offer an open house or obtain a small banquet room in your community. Besides refreshments, be sure the place is brightly decorated. GREETING CARDS. Do you send out greeting cards to major customers or clients? Holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries make nice greeting card occasions. Greeting cards create enormous goodwill and keep your name in front of people. SEMINARS. In this information hungry age, people love to receive advice, especially about their personal needs and hobbies. If you sell health foods or run fitness classes, perhaps you can offer "wellness" seminars during lunchtime to your area's business community. If you're an interior decorator, perhaps you can offer onehour decorating workshops to any group of ten people who will gather in someone's home. If you're running a printing business, perhaps you can offer tours and layout seminars at your plant. If you're not pleased with your promotional efforts today or if you simply must increase your exposure among customers and prospectsit's probably time to increase your publicity efforts. By all means, advertise in the media if you can or must. But don't neglect your greatest promotional assestyour mind. Ponder the products, services, and events you can offer the community and devise a creative promotional strategy around them. You'll have to invest a bit of time and energy in the project, but the payoff will be worth it. You'll save hundredsor even thousandsof advertising dollars and, better yet, you'll travel a wellworn shortcut to profit. 450 FIRMS THAT OFFER VARIOUS WORKATHOME OPPORTUNITIES On this sheet are approxiamtely 450 Firms that offer WorkAtHome opportunities. Firms that will pay you by the hour or by the piece. Pay you a commission or a percentage of the profits. Set you up in your own business or let you become one of their associates. Listed on this sheet is an opportunity for almost evryone. Whether you are looking to start your own business or assemble items for various companies. Maybe your looking to sell jewelry or run home parties..whatever you interest...there are firms listed that can help you get started. When sending for information, please be certain to enclose a SASE (Selfaddressed, stamped envelope). *** This list is sold as information ONLY! All firms are belived to be reliable. However, we act only as a reporting service and are not responsible for any dealings you may have with any of the firms listed. Nor are we responsible for address changes or fims that may go out of business. AMERICAN WOODCRAFT, P.O. Box 167, Ft. Lupton, CO 80621 S R ENT, Box 118, Fort Lupton, CO 80621 INFOPRENEUR, Box 96, Dept K18, Purdy, MO 65734-0096 RIBBON TEK USA, 900 E Filmore St.,Colorado Springs, CO 80907 CAMERA VENTURES, P.O. Box 771, Lamar, CO 81052 JD ENT, Alamos, C0 81101 GARRETSON'S ENTERPRISES, Box 1381, Worland, WY 82401 SPECIAL SELECTIONS, Box 3243, Boise, ID 83703 M & H, 1370 left, Orem, UT 84107 BLAIR ENT.,812 William Way, Murray, UT 84107 BALLOON WRAP UP, 2382 S. Redwood Rd.,Salt Lake City, UT 84119 WESTART, 221 E. Camelback 1, Phoenix, AZ 85015 BARRA CHEMICAL CORP.,6843 N. 21st Ave.,Phoenix, AZ 85015 DISCOUNT PERFUMES INTER.,6843 N. 21st Ave.,Phoenix, AZ 85015 SUPER GLOSS MFG. CO.,3431 W. Carendon, Phoenix, AZ 85017 DEPENDABLE MAILING SERVICE, 3620 E. Thomas, C133, Phoenix, AZ 85018 US GOLD CHAIN MFG. CO., 11460 N. Cave Creek Rd.,Phoenix, AZ 85020 BAKER, 2211 W. Bluefield, Phoenix, AZ 85023 DEFENSE CORP.,201 Lone Cactus Dr.,Phoenix, AZ 85027 GUARDIAN, Box 31175, Phoenix, AZ 85046 LLYOD ATKINS, 9025 E. Crescent Ave.,Mesa, AZ 85208 LITTLEGUY'S, Box NFP, Winkleman, AZ 85292 MINIWORK, AA, Winkleman, AZ 85292 PASTERZ, 6239 W. Charter Oak, Glendale, AZ 85304 SUCCESS, 5932 W. Bell #D106, Glendale, AZ 85308 GOOD EARTH, 14 Sunset Pt.,Oracle, AZ 85623 GOOD EARTH CRAFTWORKS, Old Hwy 77, Drawer 1150, Oracle, AZ 85623 AZ HANDICRAFTS, 7315 N. Oracle RD.,Suite 105354, Tucson, AZ 85704 AAZ HANDCRAFTS, 4365 E. 20th St.,Tucson, AZ 85711 RUNNING BARE, Box 32045, Tucson, AZ 85751 SUN FASHIONS DESIGNS, INC.,Box S10745, Prescott, AZ 86304 LUCKYBUCKS, Box 1185, Chino Valley, AZ 86323 TURNERBRADSHAW, 303A Washington S.E. Albuquerque, NM 87108 NEW MEXICO CUSTOM DESIGNS INC.,Box 27417, Albuquerque, NM 87125 BOSCO JEWELERS, INC.,P.O. Box 8426, Albuquerque, NM 87198 VIEJO PUBLICATION, 3540 Wilshire Blvd.,#310, Los Angeles, CA 90010 DREAMSCAPES, 2140 E. 7th Pl.1 Los Angeles, CA 90021 WDC, 639 W. 60th St.,Los Angeles, CA 90044 INTERNATIONAL, Box 46689, Los Angeles, CA 90046 PROGRESS, Box 93248, Los Angeles, CA 90046 ENTERPRISE, 263 S. La Cienega #B211, Beverly Hills, CA 90211 CREATIVE CIRCLE,15711 S. Broadway, Gardena, CA 90248 CREDIT CLINIC, Box 10323, Marina del Rey, CA 90295 AMER. MILLIONAIRES CLUB, 1100 Glendon Ave.,Suite 2045, Westwood, CA 90330 CATTANI OF CALIFORNIA, 11842 Hamden Pl.,Sante Fe Springs, CA 90674 SM PUBL.,20119 Rhoda Cir.,Cerritos, CA 90701 NATIONAL MARKETING SERV., 321 E. Carson St.,Carson, CA 90745 JUNECO, 4228 Lakewood #U, Long Beach, CA 90808 P.K., 1621 Gish St.,#1A, Long Beach, CA 90815 BASCO, 9401 De Soto Ave.,Ste B38431, Chatsworth, CA 91311 COLOR FAST MARKETING SYS.,9522 Topango Canyon Blvd.,Chatsworth, CA 91311 CUSTOM CASE SUPPLY, 9329 De Sota Ave.,Chatsworth, CA 91311 SMC 9401 De sota Ave.,Chatsworth, CA 91311 SPECIALITY MERCH. CORP.,9401 De Sota Ave.,Chatsowrth, CA 91311 MULTPURPOSE DRINKING WATER SYS.,21339 Nordhoff St.,Chatsowrth, CA 91311 JAKS OF CALIFORNIA, 15652 Hill View ln.,Granda Hills, CA 91344 MONEY FOR COLLEGE, 18846 Balboa Blvd.,Granada Hills, CA 91344 OMNI CREATIONS, 28651 Darrow Ave.,Saugus, CA 91350 MELLINGER CO., 6100 Variel Ave.,Woodland Hills, CA 91367 DH FINE, 13659 Victory #226, Van Nuys, CA 91401 TODDCO, 4219 W. Olive St.,Burbank, CA 91505 j. fINNIN ASSOC.,6850 Vineland Ave.,Unit J, N. Hollywood, CA 91605 CPC, 407 N. Huntington, Monterey Pk.,CA 91754 ACTION, Box 5499, Diamond Bar, CA 91765 MCDOWELL, Box 5529, Diamond Bar, CA 91765 SD, 1313 N. Grand, Walnut, CA 91789 ENTERPRISE, Box 4309, W. Covina, ca 91791 financial, bOX 4309N. W. Covina, CA 91791 HOMEWORKERS, Box 711348, Santee, CA 92072 NBM, Box 1087D, Valley Ctr.,CA 92082 LEATHERWORKS, LTD.,993C South Santa Fe Ave.,Vista, CA 92083 AIMYN, Box 60329, San Diego, CA 92106 PACIFIC, Box 23614, San Diego, CA 92123 MOUNTAIN PUBLISHING, Box 1573, Big Bear Lake, CA 92315 IMAGES, 2727 Pacific #107B, Highland, CA 92346 ASW MARKETING, Box 306B, Wrightwood, CA 92397 LOTIONS AND LACE, 6235A Rivercrest Dr.,Riverside, CA 92507 TWT, 755 E. Date St.,Brea, CA 92621 PFA, Box 697, Dana Point, CA 92629 ROBERT BINNY, 9341 Hudson Dr.,Huntington Bch.,CA 92646 EQUAL OPP. FOUNDATION, Box 2335, Laguna Hills, CA 92653 TOPPMED, INF.,1 Corporate Park, 100, Irvine, CA 92714 AUTOMATED COMMUNICATION, 203 Tulane Ave.,Ventura, CA 93003 MY ESSENCE PERFUMERY, 133 E. DeLaGuerra, 423, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 NATURESAFE, 133 DeLaGuerra, 423, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 STRICTLY VACTIONS, 108 1/2 W. Mission St.,Santa Barbara, CA 93101 SHOP, 433 Douglas, San Francisco, CA 94114 HOLIDAY MAGIC, Box 883786, San Francisco, CA 94188 H & W ENT.,1238 W. Hillsdale Blvd.,#304120, San Mateo, CA 94403 DISCOVERY TOYS, 400 Ellinwood Way, Suite 300, Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 FUNCRAFT, P.O. Box 2760, Fairfield, CA 94533 HOMESPUN, Box 3338, Fairfield, CA 94533 ADPA, Box 7990, Fremont, CA 94537 SHAKLEE CORP.,1922 Alpine Way, Hayward, CA 94540 FIBER WORKS GALLERY, 1940 Bonita Ave.,Berkeley, CA 94704 SAN FRANCISCO JEWELRY CO.,Box 10267, San Rafael, CA 94912 CALIFORNIA HANDICRAFT, P.O. Box 2210, Novato, CA 94948 DIET GUIDANCE INTER.,100 Upper Rd.,1502, Ross, CA 94957 SREC. ENT.,Box 8133, La Verne, CA 95159 ENVELOPES, 1545 Parkmoor, San Jose, CA 95159 SNAIL FARMS, 4928 Everglade, Rincon Valley, CA 95405 FOUR WINDS PUBLISHING, 4729 Amelia Dr.,Fair Oaks, CA 95628 HOME CRAFT BUYERS, Box 370, Garden Valley, CA 95633 CREATIVE TREASURES, 6836 Duckling Way, Sacramento, CA 95842 DYNAMIC IDEAS, 6055 Nash Way #C11, Sacramento, CA 95842 PROFIT, 3731 Kanaina #325, Hinolulu, HI 96815 SHUTU, Box 349, Oregon City, OR 92708 HOMEWORK, Box 4385, Portland, OR 07208 RENTASTORK, Box 12302, Portland, OR 97212 JOSE MARINO, 6999 Talmadge Rd.,Independence, OR 97351 SANDCASTLE CREATIONS, Box 563, Newport, OR 97365 WES STATE MORTGAGE, 834 Pearl St.,Eugene, OR 97401 HARTWICK, Box 348, Pt. Oxford, OR 97465 JASON TOLLESON, Rt 5 Box 1031, #8, Klamath Falls, OR 97601 LASER PRODUCT CONSULT, 1075 Bellvue Way NE, 501, Bellevue, WA 98004 SPARKLE & SHINE CLEANING SERV.,9330 Juanita Dr. NE 402, Kirkland, WA 98034 WORLD WIDE TRADE, Medina, WA 98039 HOMESTEAD, Box 988, Friday Harbor, WA 98250 CONSULTANTS, Box 1922, Sumas, WA 98501 R & R, Box 111733, Tacoma, WA 98411 MERCANTILE, 1023 Adams, Olympia, WA 98501 PANTHER PUBL.,Box 2293, Aberdeen, WA 98520 VINEYARD, 771NC, Battle Ground, WA 98604 R.K., 4700 Lavina St.,Vancouver, WA 98663B BOB'S NOTIONS, 2341 Boston Rd.,Suite 502, Wilbraham, MA 01095 AMERICAN TOY PARTIES INC., 20 Craig Rd., Acton, MA 01720 SOLLIEN ENT.,Box 2060, Wakefield, MA 01880 SATIN DOLL ENT., 78 Water St.,beverly, MA 01915 BLUEJAY SYSTEMS, 41 Driscoll St.,Peabody, MA 019620 ROBCROSS, Box 8768, Boston, MA 02114 NWC PUBLISHING CO.,158 Boomingdale St.,Chelsea, MA 02150 JEFF ROBERTS C0.,299 Newport Ave.,Wollaston, MA 02170 ASTRASCOPE CORP.,78 Stone Pl.,Melrose, MA 02176 RICHMOND SALES, INC.,42 Power Rd.,Pawtucket, RI 02860 ANKA CO.,INC.,90 Greenwich Ave.,Warwick, RI 02860 HOOK FAST, Box 1088, Providence, RI 02901 ANCHOR SPECILATIES CO.,P.O. Box 3958, N. Providence, RI 02911 CHEMICAL SPECIALTY LABS, 61 Potter St.,E. Providence, RI 02914 UNITED BRONZE, INC.,Box 4799, Rumford, RI 02916 ANKA CO.,INC.,40 Freeway Dr.,Cranston, RI 02920 COMPUTER PROFITS, Box 3103, Nashua, RI 03061 MORIARITY, Box 175, Danville, NH 03819 OPPORTUNITIES, P.O. Box 2780, North Conway, NH 03860 COVONS, Box 1305, Brunswick, ME 04011 BEN, Box 169, Franklin, VT 05457 HARROW PUBL.,Box 176, Danielson, CT 06239 WORLDWIDE ENT.,Old Colony Rd.,Eastford, CT 06242 LEISURE GROUP LTD., 58 River St.,Milford, CT 06460 ART STUDIO WORKSHOPS, 662 Boston Ave.,Bridgeport, CT 06610 MAILERS, Box 30, Thomaston, CT 06787 DOUBLE EG CREATIONS, P.O. Box 772, Brookfield, CT 06804 PCW, Box 3349, Danbury, CT 06813 RSB, Box 2659, Danbury, CT 06813 ECENT, Box 108, Bayonne, NJ 07002 AMERICAN WREATH RING CO., 1114 Birch St.,Boontown, NJ 07005 LENHART, 8 Sanford, W. Caldwell, NJ 07006 O'DONNELL'S, 9 Sewanois, Lincoln Pk.,NJ 07035 INT'L INT. NEWSLETTER, Box 636AA, Newark, NJ 07101 TESTRITE iNSTRUMENT CO., 135 Monroe St.,Newark, NJ 07105 CORVI FASHIONS, INC., 195 New York Ave.,Jersey City, NJ 07307 MAIL ORDER ASSOC.,INC., 120 Chestnut Ridge Rd.,Montvale, NJ 07645 AFE, 879 West Park Ave.,#228A, Ocean, NJ 07712 GS & NHOME PROFIT, P.O. Box 416, Toms River, NJ 07854 ACADEMIC GUIDANCE SERV.,15000 R Commerce Pkwy.,Mt. Laurel, NJ 08050 N. ROLAND, Box 350, Elwood, NJ 08217 FINANCE UNLIMITED, D Box 277, Mays Landing, NJ 08330 ABRAHAM BOXER & SONS, 110 West 26th, New York, NY 10001 WORLD WIDE BEADS, 217 East 85th St.,Suite 399, New York, NY 10001 PROFITABLE IDEAS, Box 5337, New York, NY 10185 AGENCY BUREAU, 250 West 55th St.,New York, NY 10019 HOME MAGAZINE SALES, 250 W. 55th St.,New York, NY 10019 VIEJO PUBL.,217 E. 86th Suite 272, New York, NY 10028 COMMUNICATIONS, Box 996, New York, NY 10268 PETERS ENT.,Box 646, G10, Bronx, NY 10452 BODYLOG INT.,34 Maple Ave.,Armonk, NY 10504 ABC INTERNATIONAL, 405 Tarrytown Rd.,White Plains, NY 10607 VIDEOS, Box 4D, Middletown, NY 10940 COMMUNITY SERVICES ASSOC.,P.O. Box 9, Orangeburg, NY 10962 OASIS, Box 68, Brooklyn, NY 11202 CUSTOM COSMETICS, 736 Parkside Ave.,Brooklyn, NY 11203 VICTORIA ENT.,4417 18th Ave.,#238, Brooklyn, NY 11204 STEUBER MANUFAC. & SALES, 617 Sackett St.,brooklyn, NY 11217 GORMANSTON, 7014 13th Ave.,Brooklyn, NY 11228 SELMAR BROOKS PUBL.,Box 126, Brooklyn, NY 11229 NATIONWIDE, 1671 E 16th St.,Brookyn, NY 11229 ASSOCIATES, Box 350098, Brooklyn, NY 11235 NATIONPLAN, 1671 e. 16th St.,Brooklyn, NY 11229 BUSINESS, 92MG, Brighton, 11 St.,Brooklynn, NY 11235 SAVRAN, Box 815, Flushing, NY 11362 SUBSCRIPTIONS PLUS, 22835 Edgewood Ave.,Rosedale, NY 11422 LBI SYSTEMS, P.O. Box 3430, Jamaica, NY 11432 VITAMIN POWER INC.,39 St Mary's PI/PO Box 0818, Freeport, NY 11520 DALE SYSTEM, INC.,1101 Stewart Ave.,Garden City, NY 11530 INT'L BALLOON mACHINES, 13 Viking Rd.,Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 LOOKALIKES, 1695 Barbara Lane, East Meadow, NY 11547 DISTRIBUTORS, Box 431, Lynbrook, NY 11563 REAL ESTATE TAX REDUCTION SERV.,17 Franklin Ave.,201, Lynbrook, NY 11563 ASHBURN, 140 16th Ave.,Sea Cliff, NY 11579 PCW, Box 1302, Valley Stream, NY 11582 STUDIO 44, Box 806, Commack, NY 11725 KIDCO PRODUCTS, 917 Lincoln Ave.,Hollbrook, NY 11741 QUALITY, P.O. Box 6060, Miller Place, NY 11764 FOODMASTER, Burnt Hills, NY 12027 CERTIFIED REPORTS, INC.,P.O. Box 447, Kinderhook, NY 12106 FRIENDLY TOY PARTIES, 25 Corporate left Karner Rd.,Albany, NY 12203 ORIGINAL LINCOLN LOGS LTD.,Riverside Dr.,Box E, Chestertown, NY 12817 DATASEARCH, P.O. Box 55H, Middle Grove, NY 12850 DRD, 22 1/4 Augustus St.,Auburn, NY 13021 TC ENT., Box 850, Utica, NY 13503 AMERICAN RECYCLING CO.,Clayton Rd.,Alexandria Bay, NY 13607 INDUSTRIAL, Box 127, Alexandria Bay, NY 13607 SHOWCASE, Box 250, Alexandria Bay, NY 13607 B. WITHERSPOON, 53 Langmeyer Ave.,Buffalo, NY 14215 AMETHYST, Box 2348, Niagara Falls, NY 14302 ALCAS CUTLER CORP.,1116 E. State St.,Olean, NY 14760 MILES PUBL.,122 Lake Ave.,#15A,Ithaca, NY 14870 FAIRVIEW, Box 52A1, Painted Post, NY 14870 BEAUTY BY SPECTOR, INC.,McKeesport, PA 15901 VISUAL IMAGES, 300 Richfield St.,202, Pittsburg, PA 15234 DOROTHY LEEPER, 918 Canal St.,Johnstown, PA 15901 POLISHING SYSTEMS, RD 3, High St.,New Wilmington, PA 16142 LEIBIG ENT.,3703 Cold Spring Rd.,Hintingdon, PA 16652 HANOVER SHOES INC.,118 Carlisle St.,Hanover, PA 17331 ALMQUIST MANUFAC. LTD.,Dept 115R, Milford, PA 18337 FAITH GROWN WATERSAVERS, 5945 Stoney Hill Rd.,New Hope, PA 18938 NAME STATION, INC.,200 Rittenhouse Cir N. #7, Bristol, PA 19007 VOCHE IND.,Box 948, Bensalem, PA 19020 WPC, 54 Eldon Ave.,Landsdowne, PA 19050 ADVEST ADVER, INC.,220004 Darby Rd.,Havertown, PA 19083 ALOE CHARM, INC.,741 Third Ave.,King of Prussia, PA 19406 MO SPECIALTIES, 312 Carpenter St.,Reading, PA 19602 PARISI'S, 950 Devon Dr.,Newark, DE 19711 G & p PRINTERS, 1377 K St.,NW, Washington, DC 20707 A1 PRINTING, Box 914, Waldorf, MD 20601 ALLEN ASH, 16100 Malcolm Dr.,Laurel, MD 20707 MASCOR, 4807 Bethseda #344, Bethesda, MD 20814 PC GROUP, 4807 Bethesda Ave.,#116T, Bethesda, MD 20814 ROCKVILLE IND.,Box 4385, Rockville, MD 20850 MASCOR, Box 8308, Silver Spring, MD 20907 HCB, Desk 6, 713 Edgewood Rd.,Edgewood, MD 21040 PARKWAY CORP.,1930 No. Greenspring Dr.,Timonium, MD 21093 DISCOUNT BRIDAL SERV.,7162 Ambassador Rd.,Baltimore, MD 21207 ULTIMATE GREETINGS, 105 58th St.,Ocean City, MD 21842 WADE WORLD TRADE, Box 3160, Reston, VA 22090 CORP. MAILERS, 242 left Ln.,Warrentown, VA 22186 ORION PRESS, Box 8068, Alexandria, VA 22306 HERTIAGE PROD.,Box 444, Virginia Bch.,VA 23458 KUSTOM CARDS INT'L.,219 Walnut Ave.,Vinton, VA 24179 HILLCRAFT, Box 748, Franklinton, NC 27525 AIRFLO MARKETING CORP.,Box 951, Salisbury, NC 28144 AMERICAN YOUTH ENT.,128 North Merritt Ave.,Salisbury, NC 28144 ACCENTS INTERNATIONS, 909 Commerce Circle, Charleston, NC 29411 EM ENT.,Box 1315, Florence, SC 29503 UNIVERSAL FINANCIAL, Box 2009, Forest Park, GA 30050 SPR DETAIL MAGIC, 3398 Sanford Dr.,Marietta, GA 30066 TALKING BALLOON CO.,6400 Atlantic Blvd.,190, Norcross, GA 30071 RARITY HOUSE, Box 44016, Kennesaw, GA 30144 ELECTRONIC LABORATORIES, INC.,P.O. Box 2437, Newman, GA 30264 VERNON JAMES, Box 125, Red Oak, GA 30272 PHOENIX, Box 150, Snellville, GA 30278 DIRECTORY, Box 11R, Atlanta, GA 30301 HOME BUSINESS, 1484 Iverson, Atlanta, GA 30307 VIDEOSCOPE, Box 20301, Atlanta, GA 30325 TELEMANAGEMENT RESOURCES, 1849B Peeler Rd.,Dunwoody, GA 30338 CINNAMIN, 100 Galleria Parkway, 400, Atlanta,GA 30339 RMT ENT.,Rt 3, Box 317B, Winder, GA 30680 T & S, Rt 1, Box 257, Ft. Gaines, GA 31715 PDQ, Box 2007, Lake City, FL 32056 CHILDREN'S CONCERN, 3525 N.W., 86 Way, Gainesville, FL 32606 HAWKES LANDING, P.O. Box 15109, Altamonte Springs, FL 32715 IMS, Box 5460, Deltona Lks.,FL 32727 JOEL ENT. INC.,4949 Lake Cecile Dr.,Kissmmee, FL 32742 BUSINESS BROKERAGE CONSULT, 1998 N. 427th #6, Longwood, FL 32750 CONSUMER OPP.,Box 416, Orange City, FL 32763 AMERICAN NAME JEWELRY, Box 22065, Lake Orlando, FL 32830 LASTING IMPRESSIONS, Box 22065, Lake Buena, FL 32830 HAMILTON, Box 608039, Orlando, FL 32860 TUPPERWARE HOME PARTIES, Box 2353, Orlanod, FL 32902 M & K, Box 3356, Indiatlantic, FL 32903 CLIPPINGS, Box 6109, Pompano Bch.,FL 33063 HOMEWORKERS, Box 636679, Margate, FL 33063 WEALTHKIT, Box 4036, Pompano Bch.,FL 33063 R. MEDINA, 275 Kathy Ln.,Margate, FL 33068 OPPORTUNITY, Box 8848, Coral Springs, FL 33075 CRADLEGRAM, Box 164135, Miami, FL 33116 MERCHANDISING, Box 4340, Miami, FL 33169 TJM, 911 N.E. 209 Terr.,Miami, FL 33179 RANI, 8306 Mills Dr.,Miami, FL 33183 MARKETING PLUS4, Box 2139, Miami, FL 33261 E.M.,Box 694340, Miami, FL 33269 POLEY'S INDUSTRIAL, SALVAGE, 2071 NE 64th St.,Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33308 N.K. HOERTNER, Box 203, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312 CENTURY, Box 15910, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33318 IMPERIAL, Box 17410, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33318 GEORGE BARTA, Box 7103, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33338 ABUNDANT LIFE 1784 N. Congress Ave.,WPB, FL 33409 LITTLE BEAR ENT.,11330 Little Bear Way, Boca Raton, FL 33428 EUCATIONAL RESOURCE left OF AMER.,315 Golfview Dr.,Roca Baton, FL 33432 MEXICAN JEWELRY, 265 S. Federal Highway, Deerfield Beach, FL 33441 BERNARD MEDFORD, 6510 Student Way, Ft. Pierce, FL 33450 MUNKENS AD SERV.,8248 44th St.,N., Pinellas Pk.,FL 33565 GOLDEN RULE, Box 3975, Venice, FL 33595 STALLINGS, 4502 12th Ave.,Tampa, FL 33605 BUMPER, Box 22791, Tampa, FL 33622GOLD, Box 24986, Tampa, FL 33623 MAGIC SYSTEMS INC.,Box 22809,Tampa, FL 33623 PRESS MAGIC, Box 23888, Tampa, FL 33623 VACUMAGIC, Box 24986, Tampa, FL 33623 SOUTHTECH, Box 28217, Kenneth City, FL 33709 NICHOLS BRONZE SUPPLY, Box 1904, Sebring, FL 33870 UNLIMITED, Box 1904, Sebring, FL 33871 GERALD SCHAFER DIST., Box 661, Punta Gorda, FL 33951 WALPINE WOODWORKS, Box 660, Pinnellas Park, FL 34290 SELECTIVE INC.,Box 1140, Clearwater, FL 34617 CUTTERS, Box 4359, Clearwater, FL 34618 CRAFTS, Box 660, Primrose Dr.,Prattville, AL 34664 WALPINE, Box 660 Pinellas Park, FL 34664 COAST ENT.,1947 Biltmore, Port St. Lucie, FL 34985 JACK RICHIE, 214 Primrose Dr.,Prattville, AL 36067 DTC, P.O. Box 1606,Ozark, AL 36361 REN PUBL.,Box 173, Montrose, AK 36559 STEWARTS, Box 1214, Franklin, TN 37065 WORLDWIDE, Box 62, Powell, TN 37849 RAVEN, Box 5320, Sevierville, TN 37864 LUCKY HEART COSMETICS, 138 Huling Ave., Memphis, TN 38103 NATIONAL SAFETY ASSOC.,4260 E. Raines Rd.,Memphis, TN 38118 PRINCESS HOUSE PRODUCTS, Box 126, Celina, TN 38551 JOE WALKER, 50 northtown Dr.,#5F, Jackson, MS 39211 NATL MAILER, 11017 Luenberg Ct.,Louisville, KY 40223 FALCO, Box 177, Frankfort, KY 40601 MD ASSOCIATES, Box 21305, Columbus, OH 43221 FORTUNE HOUSE, 7507 S. Tamiami #215, Sarasota, FL 43231 SPORTS BAG, Box 187, DeGraff, OH 43318 SMALL APPLIANCE COVERS, Box 979, W. Liberty, OH 43357 SHACKLEFORD ENT.,5020 Tiffany, Zanesville, OH 43701 MC CALLS ENT.,Box 514, Steubenville, OH 43952 LYNETTE, 6521 Mentor Pk.,Mentor, OH 44060 MYWAY, Box 316, Mentor, OH 44060 AMERICAN CRAFTS, 13010 Woodland, Cleveland, OH 44120 MICRON, Box 4630, Akron, OH 44310 AUBREY MC DONALD CREATIONS, INC.,565 Wolf Ledges Pkwy.,Akron, OH 44331 STRING ART, Box 816, West Liberty, OH 43357 STANNKO ENT.,Box 3016, Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44223 HARTVILLE WOODCRAFTS, 12355 Market Ave.,N.,Hartville, OH 44632 ABEL ENT.,6743 Militia Hill St.,NW, Canton, OH 44718 BETTIE DAVIS, Box 1235, Mansfield, OH 44901 DIVNICK INTER.,1680 E St.,Spring Valley, OH 45370 COMTEL BROADCASTING, CBC Plaza, Sheridan, IN 46069 ALOE MAGIC, 2848 E. 55th Pl.,Box 20423, Indianapolis, IN 46220 MR. BUTTON PRODUCTS, INC.,Box 68359, Indianapolis, IN 46268 BENGEL, 2056 Smoke Rd.,Valparaiso, IN 46383 COUNTRY SIDE PUBLICATIONS, Box 115A, Galveston, IN 46932 MIDWEST, Box 5547, Lafayette, LA 47903 CREATIVE CREATIONS, P.O. Box 4269, leftline, MI 48015 DICKENS & MATSON U.S.A., 21206 Gratiot Ave.,E. Detroit, MI 48021 GENESIS CREATIONS, P.O. Box 579, E. Detroit, MI 48021 THE LM WILSON CO., Box 434, Mt. Clemens, MI 48043 JOSEPH, 15025 Ashgrove, Sterling Hts.,MI 48078 GARDACAR, INC.,Box 292, Grosselle, MI 48138 KELLEY, Box 4696P, Detroit, MI 48234 UNITED AMER.MARKET, 28003 left Oaks Ct.,Wixom, MI 48393 U.S. MAILERS, Box 338, Greenville, MI 48838 TRANSWORLD INDUST.,2961 W. Glenlord Rd.,Stevensville, MI 49127 AMWAY CORP.,7575 East Fulton Rd.,Ada, MI 49355 BARGAINHUNTERS, Box 1409, Holland, MI 49422 HAMCO, Box 7584I, Grand Rapids, MI 49510 SAA PUBLISHING, Box 117, Northport, MI 49670 BAY FRAME, P.O. Box 697, Menominee, MI 49858 MEDUSA, 2817 Capitol, Des Moines, IA 50317 ADLIB PUBLICATIONS, 51 N. Fifth St.,Fairfield, IA 52556 K.D., 123 N. 8th St.,Eldridge, IA 52748 ART & SOUL, 400 W. Sunset Dr.,Waukesha, WI 53186 BUDGET ADS, Box 21951, Milwaukee, WI 53221 SUPERIOR PRODUCTS CO., Box 975, Marinette, WI 54143 K. HANSEN, Box 453, Holmen, WI 54636 DON LING'S REMOVABLE TATTOO, Box 309, Butterfield, MN 56120 PHOTO EXPRESS, 3572 Hancock St.,San Diego, CA 92110 MASON SHOE CO., 1251 1st Ave.,Chippewa Falls, WI 54729 B & L ADVERTISING, P.O. Box 22609, Minneapolis, MN 55422 MATSON, 716 Hiwy 10, Suite 200, Minneapolis, MN 55434 MINI DONUT, 9851 13th Ave.,N. Minneapolis, MN 55441 C & M ENT.,402 W. 3 Libbey, MT 55923 CARALYNE CO., Rt 1, Box 3740, Rapid City, SD 55702 EARTH PRIDE INT'L 490 E. Main St.,Lake Zurich, IL 60047 STRAWSER SPECIALTY, 1318B S. Finley Rd.,Lombard, IL 60148 ROMANCO PUBLISHERS, Box 324, Lansing, Il 60438 FASE, 161 Lincolnway, North Aurora, IL 60542 MAX SYSTEMS, 117 W. Harrison Blvd.,Chicago, Il 60605 WYNNWOOD HOUSE, 323 Franklin Bldg.,#28502, Chicago, IL 60606 COOK BROTHERS CP.,240 No. Ashland, Chicago, IL 60607 CREATIVE CARD CO., 4401 W. Cennack Rd.,Chicago, IL 60623 WD ASSOC.,Box 25367N11, Chicago, Il 60625 LAKESIDE PRODUCTS CO., 6646 N. Western Ave.,Chicago, IL 60645 LINDCO, 3636 Peterson, Chicago, IL 60659 JEWELS BY PARK LANE, INC.,Box 1444, Chicago, Il 60690 BADGE A MINT, 348 North 30th Rd.,Box 800, LaSalle, IL 61301 REED BAUM, 101 S. Main, Breese, Il 62230 BINGO BRAIN, Box 4005, Chesterfield, MO 63006 R & S INDUSTRIES CORP., 1312 Washington Ave.,St. Louis, MO 63103 MAIL IT, Box 10070, Kansas City, MO 64111 CHRISTMAS AROUND THE WORLD, Box 9999, Kansas City, MO 64134 MASTER VEND CORP.,Box 35216, Kansas City, MO 64134 PCS SYSTEMS, Box 7367, Columbia, MO 65206 J.C. ENT.,Box 236, Washington St.,Marionville, MO 65705 JOHN HICKEY, 8452 O'Hearn, Omaha, NE 68127 AMCO, Box 30061H, Lincoln, NE 68510 OMEGA SVCS.,5000A W. Esplanade #297, Metairie, LA 70006 LDB PROPERTIES, Box 29845, New Orleans, LA 70129 HOMEMAILERS, Box 231121, Harahan, LA 70183 MICAH GRAPHIVS, Box 17726, Baton Rouge, LA 70893 HAWKINS, BOX 589,fOREMAN, ar 71836 BUCKBOARD ANTIQUES, 1411 N. May, Oklahoma City, OK 73107 RUBEY'S, Box 20514, Oklahoma City, OK 73156 NORTH WEST CRATFS, 2006 E. Second St.,woodward, OK 73801 COTTAGE IND.,103 F St., NW P.O. Box 333, Miami, OK 74355 DOSTER ENT.,5529 Rice, The Colony, TX 75056 ABOUT ME! 830 N. Glenville Dr.,Richardson, TX 75081 BLUME, Box 866714, Plano, TX 75086 BURKE & ASSOC.,9927 Galway, Dallas, TX 75218 AE APPAREL/MIXABLES, 2636 Walnut hills Ln.,205, Dallas, TX 75229 B&F SYSTEM, 3920 S. Walton Walker, Dallas, TX 75236 CAMEO COUTURES, INC.,9004 Ambassor Row, Dallas, TX 75247 MARY KAY COSMETICS, 8787 Stemmons Freeway, Dallas, TX 75247 WORLD JEWELRY IMPORTERS, 223 W. Broad, Texarkana, TX 75501 JULIA JAMES, 87 Lakewood Dr.,Gilmer, TX 75644 ATLANTIC MAIL, Box 690, Hallsville, TX 75650 MONEYLINE, Drawwer 660, Flint, TX 75762 TATE ENT.,Rt 3, Box 330, Flint, TX 75762 L.S. BLOOM, Box 5983, Richardson, TX 75803 COMPLETE CONCEPTS, Box 24064, Ft. Worth, TX 76124 THORTON, Box 470492, Ft. Worth, TX 76147 PREMIER PUBLISHERS, Box 330309, Ft. Worth, TX 76163 CLIPPINGS, Box 491A2,Gatesvilee, TX 76528 KEEPSAKE CLIPPINGS, Box 491, Gatesville, TX 76528 LANDES, 211 E. Baker, Brownwood, TX 76801 COLLEGE CONSULTANTS, 11140 Wesheimer 3177, Houston, TX 77042 FEDERAL LOCATORS, 957 Nasa Rd.,Houston, TX 77058 GEMINI PUBLISHING CO.,11543 Gullwood Dr.,Houston, TX 77089 TELCO INTERCONTINENTAL, 9812 Whithorn Dr.,Houston, TX 77095 FINANCE, Box 343, Tomball, TX 77375 KIMBERLY CUPPS, P.O. Box 120, Highland, TX 77562 JEFFERSON, Box 2306, Pt. Arthur, TX 77643 NAT'L ADVERTISERS, Box 1356, Silsbee, TX 77656 INT'L MAILERS, 5765 N.Main, Vidor, TX 77662 A & R CRAFTS, 302B N.A.S. Dr., 300, Corpus Christi, TX 78418 ADAMS ENT.,8760A Research Blvd. # 286, Austin, TX 78758 THOMPSON, 3703 Gamma St.,Amarillo, TX 79110 OPPORTUNITIES UNL.,281 N. Judge Ely #6396, Abilene, TX 79601 BOOKS, Box 4552B3, El Paso, TX 79914 IRENE'S ENT.,Box 4552, El Paso, TX 79914 ASSAULTGARD SECURITY PROD.,10255 E. 25th Ave *, Aurora, CO 80010 PIT STOP WINDSHIELD SYS.,700 Burbank St.,Bloomfield, CO 80020 OPPORTUNITIES UNL.,27084 City Rd.,13, Elizabeth, CO 80107 BLIMP11, 7254 S. Harrison Way, Littleton, CO 80122 HOPE CAREER left, Box 27715, Denver, CO 80227 THE SECRET OF RAISING MONEY WHAT TO DO ABOUT BAD DEBTS If in debt, you must devise some plan to get out of the red. You can declare bankruptcy, but that will tarnish your credit and financial records. An alternative is the "wage earner" plan, which allows you to meet your debts methodically without bankruptcy. remember, creditors hate bankruptcy because they may be left with no payment. To them, 20 percent of what you owe is better than nothing at all. But if you can get on the wageearner plan, there is another solution. Sit down with your creditors and negotiate a payment plan. Tell them how much you can pay. believe me, they will settle for less than the actual amount owed. For more information on negotiating with creditors, refer to the section titled "Take Over An OnGoing Business For Zero Down." WIPE OUT DEBTS WITHOUT BANKRUPTCY In 1938, federal law established the wageearner plan, now administered by the same branch of our judicial system that handles bankruptcy. To take advantage of the plan, you must be a wage earner and most of your income come from wages, regardless of how much you make. You can discharge any amount of your debt under this law. Here's how it works: 1. Call the nearest U.S. District Court and find out the name of the trustee who administers the wageearner plan; and make an appointment to see him. 2. Bring to your appointment all relevant financial records, such as payment books, contracts, etc. 3. The trustee will examines your finances and set up a plan by which portion of your debts is paid over a threeyear period. 4. You then make your monthly payments to the trustee who, in turn, pays each of your creditors. THE OUTCOME A possible side effect of the wageearner plan is the reduction of much of your debts, because a provision of your filing requires your creditors to appear in court. Statistics show that 40 percent of creditors fail to appear in courtin this case, you owe only 60 percent of your creditors their claims. In some cases, none of your creditors will appear. If this happens, all your debts are wiped out, without the pain of bankruptcy. If some of your creditors do appear in court, the court allows you to divide your payment into smaller amounts to be paid over a threeyear period. Once you file, you will stop bill collectors, law suits, judgements, assignments, seized bank accounts, and other actions against you. Indeed, in many cases, your credit rating may improve because you have made an honest effort to work with the lending parties to pay off your debts. Your debt may be wiped out entirely if a creditor used deceptive trade practices to induce your purchase, as defined by the Uniform Commercial Code. You should also be aware that, that under the Homestead Act, your residence may be exempted from levy to the extent determined by local law. Check with a lawyer or your local courthouse for more details. ESTABLISHING CREDIT When first establishing credit, there are several things you should do: 1. Open a checking account at a bank. A checking account verifies that you have some dealings in the financial world; mortgage banks will allow almost certainly check how you've maintained it and, most importantly, your average balance. 2. Open as many charge accounts as you can. If any company will make you a loan, it is a department store, by means of a charge cardthey know how closely their business is tied to charging. Use the cards liberally, making sure you will be able to pay off the accounts exactly according to the terms. 3. Use a cosigner. This frequently used method allows someone with no credit to get a loan relying on the good credit rating of someone else, say a parent. Banks are willing to risk the loan because the cosigner is just as liable for paying back the money as the true borrow. 5. Use a private loan company. These companies, such as Household Finance and Beneficial Finance, are more willing than banks to take a risk when lending money; for that risk, they charge slightly higher interest rates. Borrow up to your limit; pay it back religiously. MAINTAINING YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT If you have no credit, possession of a checking account is one of the main factors weighed by bank lenders when deciding whether or not to give you credit. Write down all the details of every check you write. This practice can be very valuable during tax time. If some of your checking expenses are tax deductible, note that in your checkbook. You will find duplicate checks very handy. After writing a check and transferring the amount to the register, you should write in the new balance of your checking account. If you do this, you will always know how much money you have in your account. Double check that amount of the check matches the amount you have transferred to the check register. IF you carry a few check with you, don't forget to transfer the amounts to your check register. Enter all your deposits in your checkbook as soon as you make them. KEEPING YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT BALANCED You should reconcile your checking account as soon as you receive your monthly statement. Keep your check in order, preferably by date. Compare each check you wrote with the bank statement. Mark each check off as you go along. Do the same with deposits. Get a check file so you can file your checks by month. If you ever need a cancelled check, you can find it easily. Subtract the bank charges from the balance in your checkbook. To reconcile your checking account, do the following: Subtract all the check you have written that the bank has not deducted from your bank balance (don't forget outstanding checks from the previous month). Add all the deposits you have made that the bank has not credited to your account balance. After you have finished this, your new balance should equal your new checkbook balance. Some banks will reconcile your checking account for you if you have trouble. You should always leave a floating amount in your checking account. Every time you go under that amount, deposit more money. Keep your checking account in good orderit may determine whether or not you will be given credit. HOW CREDITORS RATE YOU Your credit record lists anyone with whom you have had credit dealings. The longer your credit has been extended and the larger amount you have been allowed to charge, the better your credit rating will be. PRESENT JOB The longer you are at a job and the higher you wages are, the higher your credit rating will be. Occupations are also important. Stable occupations improve credit ratings, as does more than 10 years employment. Utility companies will usually grant you credit if you have worked for the same employer for at least 18 months. CREDIT BUREAU FILE You should find out if there are errors on your credit bureau file and correct them. A bad rating with the bureau can ruin your chances of getting credit. BANK ACCOUNTS AND CREDIT CARDS If you have accounts in good order, you will ensure a high rating. Overdrawn checking accounts and unpaid credit card balances will hurt your rating. INCOME Your rating will improve, not because of what you make, but because of what you bring home (net income). AGE Generally, the older you are, the better risk you are. By law, those older than 62 cannot be rated lower than those younger. DEPENDENTS Usually, dependents do not improve your credit rating because they are considered expenses. Your ability to support your dependents will influence your credit rating. ADDRESS AND PHONE Having the same address and phone number for several years show stability, so the longer you have them, the better your credit rating. CAR OWNERSHIP If you own a car, especially a late model, your credit rating will benefit. You will also benefit if you are paying for the car on installments and if you have always paid on time. But car payments may also hurt you because they add to your expenses. EXPENSES AND DEBTS The more expenses, the lower your rating. A loan officer looks at how much money you have left after you meet your monthly expenses. He looks for a lowincometoexpenses ratio. DOWN PAYMENT If you want to buy something on credit, the larger the down payment you offer, the better your chances of success. The more you put down, the lower risk you are to the lender. METHODS OF GETTING CREDIT If you want to establish credit at a fast, but sure pace, follow these instructions. Open a savings account, and deposit money on a regular basis. Soon after, open an interestbearing checking account. Have no overdrafts. Pay your rent and utility bills on time. To eliminate or reduce the large deposit usually required by utilities, have your employer verify that you have worked for him more than 18 months. If you apply for credit and are turned down, find out why. By law, the party that turned you down for credit must tell you why. When you find out why you were refused, improve that aspect of your credit history. Buy things on layaway plans and pay them off in a week or two. After doing this a few times, apply for credit at the stores, and make sure the credit officers know about your layaways. Apply for credit from all the stores you know. If you do establish credit, make all payments early and don't miss a single one. Make sure you can pay back all the debts you incur. ANOTHER METHOD OF GETTING CREDIT For this plan to work, you need to start with a least $1,000. Borrow from friends if you have to. Go to a bank of your choice and deposit the money in a savings account. Wait a few days for the account to be posted, return to the bank and ask for a $1,000 loan, offering the money in your savings account as collateral. Since your money is excellent collateral, the bank will loan you the money without making a credit check. Next, go to another bank and open a savings account by depositing the $1,000 you just borrowed. return to the second bank a week later and ask for a loan using your savings account money as collateral. repeat this process with a third bank. Wait a few days, then open a checking account at a fourth bank. Begin making payments on each of the three loans. A week later, make more payments on your three loans until you have almost paid off all your balances. Any credit investigation will show you with three active bank loans, a checking account and a paying history for all three loans. Once you have established a good credit rating, you may apply for loans, credit cards and other forms of credit. PROTECTING YOUR CREDIT It is your job to protect your credit. Make sure: 1. If your loan application is rejected, ask if the reason is your credit report. If it is, get that report and correct any errors on it, no matter what time and effort are required. When the corrections are made, reapply for the loan. 2. If disaster strikesyou become ill or loose your joband can't make payments, tell your banker. Don't lie and hide. 3. Know the laws that protect you: a) Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which prohibits creditors from using false or misleading threats or abuse and harrassment. b) Fair Credit Reporting Act, which allows you to get a copy of your credit report and correct errors. c) Truth in Lending Act, which makes lenders detail exactly how much the loan is going to cost you. d) equal Credit Opportunity Act, which forbids lenders denying you credit because of your age, sex, race or marital status. GET ANY CREDIT CARD YOU WANT If you establish credit using the above procedure, you should have no trouble getting any credit card you want, but there are still a few guidelines you should follow to ensure you have no difficulties: 1. Apply for department store cards first. Purchase something, and then pay the balance off when it comes due. 2. Apply for gasoline credit cards using department store cards as references. 3. Apply for bank cards, such as Mastercard and Visa. 4. Apply for entertainment and travel cards, such as American Express and Diner's Club. HOW TO GET ON A LOAN'S OFFICER'S GOOD SIDE 1. Have a good reason for requesting the loan. The likelihood of you repaying a loan for a trip to Europe is not as great as that of you repaying a loan for home improvements, a business venture, a real estate purchase, etc. Prove to the loan officer that your reason for requesting a loan is good and that you are not a high risk. 2. Be honest. Be honest when the loan officer asks you about your finances, but don't say more than you have to. 3. Don't get angry with the loan officer. He may say no today and yes tomorrow. 4. Be confident and optimistic at all times. 5. Agree with the loan officer on as many issues as you can. people don't like to hear the word "no." If you must disagree, this sales technique: "Yes, I understand what you're saying, but...." 6. Be calm and collected at all times. Don't be afraid of the loan officer. You will be doing as much for his institution as he will be doing for you. Being afraid will only make you nervous and jumpy. 7. Know as much as possible about the loan before you apply for it. This will put the loan officer on the defensive. 8. Be well dressed and groomed for the interview. 9. Be open to any suggestions or criticism, and try to see the situation from the loan officer's point of view. GETTING TURNED DOWN FOR A LOAN If you are turned down for a loan, find out whyit's your right. Request your TRW report, and be sure it is accurate. Correct any errors on it. By studying your credit report, you should be able to find out why you were refused. Work on your weaknesses, and try again for another loan. Don't give up until you get a loan. If you have done all you can to improve your credit rating, and are still unable to obtain from your bank, consider these options: 1. A credit union loanoften they are easier to get than loans from a bank, and the interest is sometimes lower. 2. A source other than your bankoften other lending institutions have less rigid qualifications for loaning their money; for examples, HOusehold Finance and Beneficial Finance. Interest is usually higher, however. 3. A cosigneroften you will get a loan if someone with a good credit rating cosigns your application. RAISING LARGE AMOUNTS OF MONEY I have put together a list of some of the best creative financing techniques available. People have made a lot of money using these techniques, and that's why companies charge $10 to $20 just to share them with you. Raise $200,000 In 24 Hours With Only Your Signature As Collateral Many people have opportunities that require quick cash, but most are unable to capitalize because of a lack of ready money. There is a simple procedure that allows you to generate quick cash in 24 hours. The process is easy and fast, but requires that you first make necessary preparations and lay out the groundwork for the plan. Begin by going to 10 banks and telling the loan officer at each that you want to borrow $1,000 for 10 Days. After paying back your loans, wait 30 days before going back to the banks. This time, request a larger amount, depending on what you think the bank will loan, say $5,000. If each bank approves a $5,000 loan, you raise $50,000 the second time you collect from the banks. Continue this stepbystep process. Each time you go to the bank, ask for a larger loan and a longer pay back period. What you are doing is establishing a millionaire's credit rating using the process of repetition. That is, you are always paying back the money when it is due. Making your payments on time, combined with the number of loans that you have taken out and paid back, enables you to establish a very powerful credit rating and good relations with lending institutions. After using this procedure for about a year, you should be able to borrow $20,00 from each bank on just your signature. Using 10 banks in this plan, you will be able to borrow $200,000 on your signature in as little as 24 hours. HOW TO KEEP BORROWED MONEY INDEFINITELY A variation of the previous plan enables you to maintain a constant cash flow. By applying to twice as many banks, you may pay back loans with loans you receive from other banks. However, wary of using such a method, but don't forget that companies do this all the time. They issue bonds to pay off debts, and when these bonds are due, they issue more bonds. Debtrenewal systems are very common among investors. HOW TO RAISE $50,000 OVERNIGHT ON YOUR SIGNATURE You can borrow up to $50,00 and use for as long as you like. How? With the use of overdraft protection, which is, in effect, a loan. It is money that is transferred into your checking account when you overdraw. Once you qualify, this protection is automatic, but there is usually a predetermined overdraw limit set by your bank, and you usually have to pay interest on the money you borrow. Once you have worked out a "credit plan," it is not hard to get your application approved. The first step of this system is to open 10 checking accounts at four different banks. Apply for overdraft protection with a $5,000 limit at each bank. It is important that you apply for overdraft protection at each bank without the other banks knowing that you already have such accounts. Banks don't want to overextend you. If they know that you have other accounts, they may deny you accounts at their branches. You may think $5,000 is a high limit, but it's not for a bank. Banks often have checking accounts with overdraft limits of up to $25,000 Some banks amy not give you a $5,000 limit at first, but don't let that discourage you. Stay with the bank for a few months, then reapply for the $5,000 limit.Do you see how easily you can transform this overdraft protection into $50,000 cash overnight with only your signature as collateral? You can raise $50,00 by writing 10 checks for $5,00 each. KEEP MONEY FOR AS LONG AS YOU LIKE Banks usually require you to pay back 5 percent, or onetwentieth, of the loaned amount every month. However, this rule is not always enforced. If you keep your loan under the overdraft limit, the bank may not require you to make principal or interest payments. Some banks require you to make payments every month. How can you keep the money? Borrow money from eight different banks, each with $5,000 overdraft limits, and you have $40,000 to use. Let's say that your loan payments total $2,200 per month. Use a loan from a ninth bank to make the first two monthly payment. For the third monthly payment, use the money from your other accounts to pay off the loan from the ninth bank. Repeat this process, and you will be able to keep the money indefinitely. This process works if the banks do not charge you interest on the money you borrow. If they do charge you interest, you can only keep the money for a limited time. In any case, it is very important to have a good investment for the money you borrow. MULTIPLY YOUR MONEY WITH A 'Compensating Account' You can get a loan from a bank by depositing a "compensating balance" into an account. In most cases, a compensating balance amounts to about 20 percent of the loan it is insuring. You may be able to borrow up to five times the amount you deposit into the account. Your ability to use this process depends on how good your credit rating is. If you have a poor credit rating, you may have to deposit a higher percentage of the loan. GETTING AN INSTANT LOAN, INTEREST FREE Mastercard and Visa have a service that allows you to get a free loan with their special checkwriting service. The check you write is simply billed against your credit card, and has the effect of an instant loan. You may have a seen this type of check with your regular statements. The way to make this loan pay off is to find a bank that accepts this type of special check with a 30day grace period. To get an indefinite loan, write the first special check and do whatever you want with the money. Then write a second special check and deposit the money into your checking account. Use this money to pay back the credit card company. In this way, you may keep the money indefinitely. HOW TO RAISE $50,00 USING YOUR CREDIT CARDS In today's "credit World" virtually everyone has credit cards. Millions of Americans carry as many as 30 credit cards, with credit limits averaging about $1,000 per card. With just your credit cards, you can get more than $15,000 in cash and merchandise. even hardtoget credit cards, like American Express and Carte Blanche are easy to get once you have cards like Mastercard and Visa. American Express and Carte Blanche have limits as high as $20,000. Combining these cards with cards like Visa and Master Card can give you credit up to $50,000 for 60 days, with no interest. RAISING MONEY USING DEPARTMENT STORE CARDS You can use your department store cards to raise quick cash. Simply go to the stores that have issued you cards and charge merchandise. A few days later, return the merchandise for merchandisecredit slips instead of having your account credited. These slips may be used for future purchases, and they are as good as cash in those particular stores. Then cancel these credit slips to your friends and neighbors for a 10percent discount. Since this money is to be used for an investment, make sure the investment will pay higher than 10 percent. If you begin this plan right after your monthly billing notice, you will have the use of the money for 60 days and pay no interest to the department store. SAVE 33.3% ON CREDIT CARD INTEREST CHARGES In most states, banks are allowed to charge you only 1.5 percent on unpaid balances of your credit card accounts. This comes out to 18 percent per year, which is a high interest rate. Because these states consider them loans, the banks can only charge you 1 percent interest per month. That's 12 percent per year. How can you use this to your advantage? Make purchases with your credit cards, and pay off these same purchases with a cash advance. With this method, you pay for the purchases about 30 days after you make them and at a rate of only 1 percent per month. You will cut your credit expenses by onethird using this method. ALTERNATE METHOD This method of raising capital requires that you place a classified ad in the business opportunities section of your Sunday newspaper. Here are a few examples: Will pay___ percent interest on small loan for a short period. Sound collateral. Your name and phone number. Advertise in the "Business Opportunities" or "Capital Wanted" sections of the paper. If you live in a small town, put the ad in a bigtown newspaper. THE CORPORATE METHOD OF RAISING MONEY You can get money you need by forming a corporation. Besides being easy to form, there are many advantages. For instances, you can be authorized to sell one million shares of stock at no par value when creating the charter for the corporation. Let me show you an example of how your corporation will work. First, issue one million shares of stock once you are authorized to do so. Keep 300,000 shares for yourself and reserve another 300,000 for future sales to the public. The remaining 400,000 shares should be issued for public sale at about $1 per share. If you sell 100,000 shares, you will have raised $80,00 after deducting a 20 percent broker's fee. In time, your stock may go up to $5 per share. Your stock that was worth $300,000 will then be worth $1.5 million. You will have quadrupled the worth of your stock. And this doesn't include the stock that you reserved for future sale. You may find this example hard to believe, but the truth is, people just like you make it work. If you have a worthwhile venture, this may be your best option. I must point out one drawback of this method. You must go through the United States Security Stock Commission in order to incorporate. For this you will need legal council, which is expensive. However,many lawyers will accept shares of stock in your corporation as payment for their service. DO AWAY WITH SEC REGISTRATION There is a way to sell and trade stock without going through the SEC red tape: Price your stock at 10 cents per share and make the total selling price of the corporation's stock less than $50,000. These shares are known as penny stock. You may begin by issuing 100share lots and distributing them to those you feel want to invest in your venture. Before you know it, you will have raised thousands of dollars, interestfree, which you will never have to pay back. TAKE OVER AN ONGOING BUSINESS WITH ZERO CASH I Have spoken to many people who want to start their own businesses, and I fully support their efforts. I believe in learning from others, in not reinventing the wheel. If you have had a lot of experience in a certain field, you should have no trouble operating a business related to that field. But if you have little or no experience in a business, you have two choices: work for a company to gain experience in the field you want to enter; or buy an existing business. To buy a business, you need money. This section will show you how to buy an existing business inexpensively. Preferably you will know a great deal about the business you are entering. GETTING STARTED To get started, look for a business that is in deep trouble, one that is almost bankrupt. Many such businesses may be acquired with little or no down payment. They may be manufacturing businesses, service businesses, real estate businesses, etc. Why would someone offer a business for zero cash down? here's why: 1. The owner of a failing business wants to get out from under his bills and headaches. 2. He believes the business is beyond saving. 3. Finding a buyer for a heavily indebted business is extremely difficult. There are always plenty of cashflow take overs available, whatever the state of the economy. These business offers are often advertised, but you have to look for them. Search through business ads in newspaper classifieds and trade magazines, check with local business brokers and with local real estate agents who also handle business sales. FIND OUT EVERYTHING Once you find a suitable firm, learn all its details. For instance, find out how much the business owes and to whom, the value of the inventory and all machinery and the value of the building and the property itself. Look for a company in which the inventory and assets are higher than the debts. Also consider the sales income and expenses required to operate the business profitably. Examine such things as gross sales, selling and labor costs, taxes owed, etc. This information may be gathered from the firm's account books, income tax returns or from an accountants' certified statement. MAKE YOUR OFFER Explain your belief to the owner that you can turn the business around and make it profitable, but that it will take at least two years. Here is a typical offer to make the owner of such a business: Zero cash down Pay all company debts Promissory notes No payments for two years Be sure your lawyer draws up a proper sales agreement before you buy. You should also make arrangements to pay the attorney's legal fees from the business funds, not out of your own pocket. If you find that the owner insists on a nominal down payment,, you may use any of the capitalraising methods described earlier to come up with cash. However, you must insist on paying the bulk of the price with promissory notes. You must also insist that payments do not begin for a year, preferably two. You will need that much time to turn the business around and show a profit. Once you acquire the sick business, you must take certain steps to make it profitable. The first step is to deal with the creditors. Here's what you do. Set up an appointment with each creditor to discuss the firm's indebtedness. Explain to each that you have just taken over the business, and that you would like to pay off all the debts as soon as possible. Tell them that the business has no cash at the moment, but that you hope to start showing a profit in six months to a year. Your strategy is to convince the creditors to accept a reduced settlement of the debt. First, try to get a reduction of 30 to 70 percent of the total debt. You may also insist that payments do not begin for at least one year. Your third request will be for longterm repayment, 10 years if possible. Once the creditors accept your offer, make it legal by having them sign agreements. With this maneuver alone, you will have reduced your debt from 30 to 70 percent, lowered payments by getting the payoff time extended, and received complete debt relief for the whole year. Taking care of the business' debts helps substantially. The business is then in a far better position to recover from its ailments, but don't stop there. There are other things you can do to improve its financial standing, such as: 1. Sell excess inventories: finished goods or raw materials. 2. sell obsolete production machinery 3. Sell more company stock 4. Sell a separate division of your company. 5. Split your company into separate firms and sell stock for both. 6. Make any cost cuts you can: reduce payroll, find cheaper supply sources, eliminate waste, etc. 7. Eliminate products, services or accounts that are only marginally profitable. 8. Study how to increase sales and locate new markets. As incredible as it may sound, there are many businesses saved by using these methods. All too frequently, owners are completely unaware of the true value of their businesses. In many cases, an owner has exhausted his operating capital and credit through mismanagement. Your offer allows him to recoup some of his investment, and it may be the only one he gets. THE CORPORATE TAKEOVER You may use a variation of the promissorynote method offering the owner corporate stock as a down payment, or even as full payment if the owner is desperate. Assuming you set up a corporation with 10 other investors, the owner will be assured of a sales potential of 10 customers for his stock, once the business gets going. HOW TO CREATE SUCCESSFUL LOAN REQUESTS The proposal you submit for your loan will determine whether or not the banker will give it to you. The following formula will show you how to apply successfully for a loan. COVER PAGE On this page, include your name and address and the names and addresses of any others who are applying jointly with you. This page goes on the front of the loan request, and it should contain the title of your request. LETTER OF REQUEST This letter may be the most important part of your loan request, and it will determine if you get the loan. The letter must get right to the point and tell the loan officer exactly what he has to know in one or two pages. The letter should tell the officer: 1. Why you want the loan. 2. How much capital you want. 3. How you propose to pay back the loan. 4. Any personal information that may help you get the loan. CREDIT APPLICATION You may obtain a credit application form from any lending institution. DATA SHEET This form, similar to a resume, is very helpful to the lender. It contains background information about yourself and all your personal information, such as name, address, height, weight, marital status, birthdate, etc. It also includes information about your past four jobs, three references and a complete record of education. MARKETING PLAN FOR BUSINESS VENTURE If you try to get a loan for a business venture, this part of your proposal is one of the most important. The function of the marketing plan is to show the lender what you will do with the money loaned you and how you will pay it back. The marketing plan proves to the lender that you will make a profit. The following six steps should be taken when creating your marketing plan. If you have trouble, contact your local SBA office for assistance. 1. Analyze Your Present Marketing Situation In order to project your company's future achievements, you muct know where it stands at the present time. In this portion of your marketing plan, analyze your company's financial resources, competitive strengths and weaknesses, orgainzational setup, market conditions, experience, management capabilities, clientele, channels of distribution (how you will distribute your product) and your competition. 2. Determine Your Marketing Objectives This step provides guidance and direction for your company. Here, you tell the lender exactly what you want your company to achieve. But remember to be specific and make sure that the numbers can be measured, such as: "Increase the market share of widgets 10 percent from January 1 to December 31, 1984." You do not have to know these numbers precisely, but you should make a rough estimate of what your company can achieve. 3. Assess Your Company's Capabilities In this step, show the lender how you will use your resources to reach your objectives. You must show that you have every resource necessary to reach your objectives, except one: a certain amount of money. In this step, explain past experiences and accomplishments that you, your company, or other company officers have had that could aid the future of your firm. Also mention anything favorable in Step 1 that may help you reach your objectives, such as your clientele, receivables, equipment, etc. 4. Create A Marketing Strategy In this step, show the lender your plan or strategy for meeting your objectives. This may include continuation or revision of an existing strategy, or be completely different strategy. A strategy is a complete plan of how you will best use your resources to meet your objectives. List each activity you will perform. It is alos important to establish which duties or activities will be delegated to which person. 5. Put Your Overall Plan On A Time Schedule In this step, place the activities you have listed in the previous step on a time schedule. List each activity and show how long it will take you to complete. You should also show beginning and completion dates. Do this with all your marketing activities. The lender not only sees what you plan to do, but how long it will take you. 6. Control And Evaluate Your PLan You should have a method of evaluating your process as you follow your plan. You should be able to control all the proposed activities and make sure they are on schedule. For examples, if your objective is to obtain 300 accounts within a 10mile zone, your control activity will check that you have done just that. The control activity will be a monthly record of the number of accounts you have obtained within the designated 10mile zone. Financial Statements Personal financial statements of all persons involved in the business venture are important to the lender. Current, as well as projected financial statements, should be included in the loan request. Projected financial statements are statements that show how predicted sales will affect future financial conditions. It is advisable to have an accountant help you prepare your statements. Statement Of Capital Expenses This statement shows the lender exactly what you plan to do with the money he loans you. You should itemize how each dollar he lends you will be spent. REAL ESTATE LOANS Having a professional, independent appraisal of the property is the first requirement. If possible, include pictures of the property, as well as maps showing its exact location. GETTING MONEY FROM VENTURE CAPITAL SOURCES Venture capital institutions will finance business investments. And since they assume the risk, they ask for equity in your business. A conventional source for a business loan takes your collateral if the business fails and charges you interest on the loan. What makes venture capital source different? Since they own part of your business, you don't have to pay them interest. Venture capital companies invest in companies that they feel will make them money. They also specialize in certain industries or fields. You will have to write them to find out where they prefer to place their money. These companies have fluctuating funds. There are times when they can loan a lot of money, and others when they don't have much to spare. Keep writing the same venture capital companies in your field. You may approach them when they have a glut of capital to loan out. It is important that you submit a professional presentation to these companies. Your chances of getting the funds will be much greater if you present your case well. Look over the section on creating a successful loan request. Follow the steps I outlined for you on your loan presentation. If you do, you have a good chance getting the money you need. VENTURE CAPITAL SOURCES The following companies asked to be listed in this book because they expressed a desire to finance new or existing ventures. Write them for more information. Explorer Fund, Inc.,28 State St.,Boston, MA 02109 State Street Bank Company, 225 Franklin St.,Boston, MA 02110 Paine Venture Fund, Box 73, Boston, MA 02110 Resources & Tech MGT Company, Box 100 Chestnut Hills, MA 02167 Gemini Associates, 234 Pearl St.,Ste One, Hartford, CT 06103 Hartford Comm. Capital Corp.,70 Farmington Ave.,Hartford, CT 06106 The Prospect Company, One Tower Eq.,Hartford, CT 06115 First Conn. S.B.I.C., 177 State St.,Bridgeport, CT 06604 Charter Oak Enter.,CBT Plaza, Darien, CT 06820 Paul Revere Investors, 1275 King St.,Greenwich, CT 06830 Anderson Invest. Com.,49 Locust St.,New Canaan, CT 06840 Wehr & Associates, 4 Forest Dr.,Westport, CT 06880 Western Group, Inc.,Box 1273, Weston, CT 06880 University Capital Corp.,107 Jefferson Ave.,Westfield, NJ 07090 Main Capital Investment Corp.,818 Main St.,Hackensack, NJ 07601 Wall Street Venture Capital, 2 Esterbrook Lane, Cherry Hill, NJ 08002 DSV Associates, 221 Nassau St.,Princeton, NJ 08540 Gunwyn Ventures, 14 Nassau St.,Princeton, NJ 08540 H.J. Morgan Company, 30 W. Prospect St.,East Brunswick, NJ 08816 Schroder Capital Corp.,One State Street, New York, NY 10004 Kalb Voorhis & Com.,27 Williams St.,New York, NY 10005 Loeb Rhodes & Company, 42 Wall Street, New York, NY 10005 American Capital Partners, 261 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10016 BT Capital Corporation, 600 3rd Ave.,New York, NY 10016 Bancap Corporation, 420 Lexington Ave.,New York, NY 10017 Royal Business Funds, ^ East 43rd St.,New York, NY 10016 R.E. Hart & Com.,Inc.,380 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10017 Bradford Ventures, LTD.,10 Rockfeller Plaza, #1010, New York, NY 10020 Winthrop Ventures, 527 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10020 Whitcom Investment Company, 110 W 51st St.,New York, NY 10020 Time Incorporated, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020 Rockefeller Bros.,Inc.,30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10020 The Franklin Corporation, ONe Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10020 Exxon Enterprises, Inc.,1251 Ave. of the Amer. Rm 4448, New York, NY 10020 Capital For Future, Inc.,635 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Technimetrics, Inc.,527 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Stewart Capital Corp.,485 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Stewart R. Mott Associates, 515 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Masco Associates, 437 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Jacobs Investment Com.,645 Fifth Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Llyod Capital Corporation, 186 Riverside Dr.,New York, NY 10024 Emerging Ventures International, 1350 6th Ave.,New York, NY 10027 R.W. Cross & Company, Inc.,1175 Park Ave.,New York, NY 10028 Midland Capital Corporation, 110 William St.,Rm 2605, New York, NY 10038 Pioneer Ventures Com.,One Battery Park Plaza, Buffalo, NY 14202 Tait & Legge, 110 Allens Creek Rd.,Rochester, NY 14618 Hillman Company, 2000 Grant Bldg.,Pittsburg, PA 15219 Osher Capital Corp.,Wyncote House 101, Wyncote, PA 19095 Allied Capital Corp.,1625 Eye St.,N.W., Rm. 603, Washington, DC 20006 Columbia Ventures, Inc.,1701 Pennsylvania Ave.,N.W. Washington, DC 20006 Greater Washington Investors, Inc.,1015 18th St.,N.W. Washington, DC 20036 Dorset Associates, 135 E. Baltimore St.,Baltimore, MD 21202 Southern Investment Corp.,P.O. Box 6610 Newport News, VA 23606 Montag & Caldwell, Inc.,2901 First National Bank, Atlanta, GA 30303 Southeastern Capital Corporation, 380 Interstate North, Ste 475, Atlanta, GA 30339 Urban Ventures, Inc.,825 S. Bayshore Blvd.,Miami, FL 33137 Gold Coast Capital Corporation, 3550 Biscayne Blvd.,Miami, FL 33137 North American Company, 111 E. Las Alas Blvd.,Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 Business Research Company, P.O. Box 2137, Palm Beach, FL 33480 Investment Cap. Corp.,P.O. Box 2069, Montgomery, AL 36103 Standard Growth Capital, Box 10106, Knoxville, TN 37919 Financial Resources, Inc.,1909 Storick Bldg.,Memphis, TN 38103 Community Venture Co.,88 E. Broad St.,Columbus, OH 43215 Dycap, Inc.,88 E. Broad St.,Columbus, OH 43215 American Fletcher Mortgage Co.,606 Madison Ave.,Toledo, OH 43604 Morgenthaler Associates, P.O. Box 91052, Cleveland, OH 44101 Capital Funds Corp.,127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114 Houston & Associate, Inc.,9 Hickory Hollow, Birmingham, MI 48010 Growth Equities, LTD.,2116 Financial left, Des Moines, IA 50309 Wisconsin Capital Corp.,840 N. 3rd St.,Milwaukee, WI 53202 Commercial Capital Corp.,6001 N. 91st St.,Milwaukee, WI 53225 Eagle Investment Corp.,921 Marquette Ave.,Minneapolis, MN 55402 North Star Industries, 4570 W. 77th St.,minneapolis, MN 55435 Northland Capital Corp.,402 W. 1st Street, Duluth, MN 55802 Vanguard Venture Capital, 301 E. Main St.,Barrington, IL 60010 Venture Capital Corporation, 540 Frontage Rd.,Northfield, IL 60093 Advance Capital Growth Corp.,401 Madison St.,Maywood, IL 60153 William Blair & Co.,135 S. La Salle St.,Chicago, IL 60603 Stewart Capital Corp.,100 S. Wacker Dr.,Rm. 202, Chicago, IL 60606 Atlant/La Salle Capital Corp.,150 S. Wacker Dr.,Chicago, IL 60606 Urban Fund, Inc.,300 N. State St.,Chicago, IL 60610 First Capital Corp.,One First National Plaza, Chicago, IL 60607 Business Capital Corp.,1732 Canal St.,Ste 110, New Orleans, LA 70112 Brittany Corp.,4324 Republic Bank Tower, Dallas, TX 75201] Venture Adviser, Inc.,2828 Forest Ave.,Dallas, TX 75215 Venture Investment Corp.,714 N. Valley Mills DR.,Waco, TX 76710 Telecom Corporation, Houston Natural Gas Bldg.,Houston, TX 77002 Enterprise Capital Corp.,4635 S.W. Freeway, Rm. 465, W Houston, TX 77027 Ricky Hicks, 6448 Fannin St,.,Houston, TX 77030 Hixon Ventures Co.,341 Milam Bldg.,San Antonio, TX 78205 Riuss $ Company, Alamo National Bldg.,San Antonio, TX 78205 Cambridge Banking, 1711 Security Life Bldg.,Denver, CO 80202 Denver Coalition Vent.,1711 Pennsylvania, Denver, CO 80202 Venture Associates, 1020 15th St.,Denver, CO 80202 R.W. Halliday Associates, P.O. Box 8508, Boise, ID 83701 Dineh Cooperatives, P.O. Box 569, Chintle, AZ 86503 Capital Manag. Serv.,611 West 6th St.,Los Angeles, CA 90017 Union Venture Corp.,445 S. Figueroa ST.,Los Angeles, CA 90017 Manus, Incorporated, 900 Wilshire Blvd.,Los Angeles, CA 90036 Professional S.B.I.C., 5979 W. 73rd St.,Los Angeles, CA 90036 Goodman & Mautner, LTD.,5250 W. Century Blvd.,Rm 444, Los Angeles, CA 90045 Brentwood Associates, 11661 San Vincente Blvd.,707, Los Angeles, CA 90049 Source Capital, Inc.,1888 Century Park East, Los Angeles, CA 90067 Wilshire Cap. Corp.,1000 Santa Monica Blvd.,Los Angeles, CA 90067 Developers Equity Com., 9348 Santa Monica Blvd.,Beverly Hills, CA 90210 The Foothill Group, 9383 Wilshire Blvd.,Beverly Hills, CA 90211 Manning & Com.,29438 Quailwood Dr.,Rancho Palos Ver., CA 90274 H.M. Eldridge, P.O. Box 1983, La Jolla, CA 92037 Alison Promotions, 5834 Soledad Mt. Rd.,La Jolla, CA 92307 Capital City Equity, 811 N. Broadway, Ste 500, Santa Ana, CA 92701 Equity Capital Corp.,25 Cornelia DR.,Hillsborough, CA 94010 Kliener & Perkins, 3000 Sand Hill Rd.,Menlo Park, CA 94025 Menlo Investment Com.,3000 Sand Hill Rd.,Menlo Park, CA 94025 Osco Ventures, 3000 Sand Hill Rd.,Rm 105, Menlo Park, CA 94025 Oak Grove Ventures, 2200 Sand Hill Rd.,Rm 110, Menlo Park, CA 94025 H&R Investment Cap.Co.,801 American St.,San Carlos, CA 94070 General Pacific Inv.,321 10th St.,San Francisco, CA 94103 The Merchants Group, 300 Montgomery St.,Rm. 908, San Francisco, CA 94104 Rock & Asso., 235 Montgomery St.,Rm. 1635, San Francisco, CA 94104 Opportunity Cap. Corp.,100 California St.,Ste 714, San Francisco, CA 94109 Bruce A. Blinn & Ass.,415 Merchant St.,San Francisco, CA 94111 Asset Management Com.,1411 Edgewood Dr.,Palo Alto, CA 94301 Hoebich Venture Manag.,860 Hamilton Ave.,Palo Alto, CA 94301 McMorgan & Company, 1000 Welch Rd.,Palo Alto, CA 94304 P.M. Investment Com.,1000 Welch Rd.,Palo Alto, CA 94304 San Fran. Venture Cap, 31285 San Clemente, Hayward, CA 94544 R&D Capital Company, 2700 Merced St.,San Leandro, CA 94577 FMC Corporation, 1185 Coleman Ave.,Box 580, Santa Clara, CA 95052 Delta Invest. Com.,555 Capital Mall, Rm 640, Sacramento, CA 95814 Trail Capital Corp.,1200 Westlake Ave.,North, Seattle, WA 98109 SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Small business investment companies are privately owned by the stockholding public. They have good flexibility when giving loans to businesses, about 90 percent of which are eligible. Each SBIC has a federal licence to operate under the SBIC Act of 1958. Each SBIC has their own rules and regulations in regards to loaning. Here is a list of SBIC's. Write them for information on their lending policies. Massachusetts SBIC Inc.,75 Federal Street, Boston, MA 02110 Parker Corp.,265 Franklin St.,Boston, MA 02110 Northeast SBI Corp.,16 Cumber land St.,Boston, MA 02115 Boston Financial & equity, P.O. Box 68, Boston, MA 02215 Pilgrim Capital Corp.,842 A Beacon St.,Boston, MA 02215 Industrial Capital Corp.,111 Westminster St.,providence, RI 02903 New England Investments, 157 High St.,Portland, ME 04101 Manufacturers SBIC, 1488 Chapel St.,New Haven, CT 06510 Nutmeg Capital Corp.,35 Elm St.,New Haven, CT 96510 First Connecticut SBIC, 177 State Street, Bridgeport, CT 06603 All State Venture Capital Corp.,P.O. Box 442, Westport, CT 06603 Engle Investment Co.,35 Essex St.,Hackensack, NJ 07601 Main Capital Company, Inc.,818 Main St.,Hackensack, NJ 07601 CMNY Capital Company, Inc., 77 Water Street, New York, NY 10005 Creative Capital Corp.,214 Mercer St.,New York, NY 10012 Forum Equity Corporation, 214 Mercer St.,New York, NY 10012 New Mexico Capital Corp.,1420 Carlisle Ave.,N.E.,Albuquerque, NM 10017 Great Eastern SBIC, 230 Park Ave.,New York, NY 10017 Basic Capital Corp.,40 West 37th St.,New York, NY 10018 The Franklin Corp.,1410 Broadway, New York, NY 10018 Struthers Capital Corp.,630 Fifth Ave.,New York, NY 10020 Capital For Future, Inc.,635 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Conresco Corp.,444 Madison Ave.,Ste 3701, New York, NY 10022 Winifield Capital Corp.,237 Mamaroneck Ave.,White Plains, NY 10605 First Westchester Corp.,491 Main St.,New Rochelle, NY 10801 Lake Success Capital Corp.,100 Garden City Plaza, #516, Garden City, NY 11530 Jefferson Capital Corp.,1228 Wantagh Ave.,Wantagh, NY 11793 Monticello Capital Corp.,34 Norh St.,Monticello, NY 12701 First Pittsburgh SBIC, 1919 Rick Bldg.,Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Sharon SBIC, 385 Shenango Ave.,Sharon, PA 16146 Fidelity America SBIC, 1520 Locust St.,Philadelphia, PA 19102 Delaware Valley SBIC, 1604 Walnut St.,Philadelphia, PA 19103 Philadelphia Ventures, Inc.,1712 Locust St.,Philadelphia, PA 19103 Capital Investment Com.,900 17th St.,N.W.,Washington, DC 20001 Housing Capital Corp.,1133 Fifteenth St.,N.W., Washington, DC 20015 Hudson Investment Co.,1150 17th St.,N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Mortgate Capital Corp.,1925 N. Lynn St.,Arlington, VA 22209 Tidewater SBIC, 300 Boush St.,Norfolk, VA 23510 Charleston Capital Corp.,19 Broad St.,Charleston, SC 29401 Kent Investment Company, 695 E. Wesley Rd.,N.E., Atlanta, GA 30324 Central Florida Investments, P.O. Box 13646, Orlando, FL 32809 First Miami SBIC, 420 Lincoln Rd.,Miami Beach, FL 33139 North Alabama SBIC, P.O. Box 430, Anniston, AL 36201 Financial Resources, Inc.,1909 Sterick Bldg.,Memphis, TN 38103 Financial Opportunities, Inc.,981 S. 3rd St.,Louisville, KY 40201 Associated Investment Com.,320 Associates Bldg.,South Bend, IN 46617 Indiana Capital Corp.,927 S. Harrison St.,Fort Wayne, IN 46802 Financial Investors, 185 Devonshire St.,Boston, MA 46802 Waterfield SBIC, Inc.,123 W. Berry St.,Fort Wayne, IN 46802 Hawaii Econ. Devel. Corp.,P.O. Box 1427 Dillingham Rd.,Honolulu, HI 46817 J & M Investment Corp.,3044 W. Grand Blvd.,Detroit, MI 48202 Midwest SBIC, 1921 First Natl. Bank Bldg.,Detroit, MI 48226 MorAmerica Capital Corp.,200 American Bldg.,Cedar Rapids, IA 52401 Northern States Capital, 330 E. Wilson St.,Madison, WI 53701 Chicago Community Ventures, Inc.,19 S. Lasalle St.,Ste 1114, Chicago, IL 60603 Minnesota SBIC, P.O. Box 1227, Minneapolis, MN 55440 First Heartland Com. Inc.,405 8th Ave.,N.E., Aberdeen, SD 57401 Berkshire Capital, Inc.,405 8th Ave.,N.E., Aberdeen, SD 57401 Small Business Improvement Co.,P.O. Box 1175, Billings, MT 59103 Abbott Capital Corp.,120 S. La Salle St.,Chicago, IL 60603 Chicago Community Ventures, Inc.,19 S. Lasalle St.,Ste 1114, Chicago, IL 60603 Vencap Fund, 10 S. La Salle St.,Chicago, IL 60603 Heizner Corp.,20 N. Wackee Dr.,Chicago, IL 60606 The Urban Fund, Inc.,1525 E. 53rd St.,Chicago, IL 60606 Combined Opportunities, Inc.,5050 N. Broadway, Chicago, IL 60640 Funded Investment, Inc.,6430 N. Central, Chicago, IL 60646 North Central Capital Corp.,203 Mulberry St.,Box 998, Rockford, IL 61105 Century Capital Corp.,250 N. Water St.,Decatur, IL 62523 Atlas SBIC, 1808 Main St.,Kansas City, MO 64108 Midland Business Investments, 122 W. Myrtle St.,Independence, KS 67301 First Small Business Investment, 1614 S. Bayou Dr.,Golden Meadow, LA 70537 Mid South Capital Corp.,312 Polk St.,Mansfield, LA 71052 Morris Capital Corp.,P.O. Box 20696, Oklahoma City, OK 73120 Investment Capital, Inc.,1301 Main St.,Duncan, OK 73533 First Dallas Capital, Corp.,P.O. Box 6031, Dallas, TX 75222 Central Texas SBIC, P.O. Box 829, Waco, TX 76703 SBIC of Houston, 640 West Bldg.,Houston, TX 77002 South Texas SBIC, 121 S. Main St.,Victoria, TX 77901 Colorado SBIC, Inc.,P.O. Box 5168, Denver, CO 80217 Intermountain Capital Corp.,18 West 3rd S.,Salt Lake City, UT 84110 Utah Capital Corp.,3600 Market St.,Salt Lake City, UT 84119 Val Vista Investment, P.O. Box 619, Phoenix, AZ 85001 Sheffield Industries, Inc.,P.O. Box 24768, Los Angeles, CA 90024 Professional SBIC, 5979 W. Third St.,Los Angeles, CA 90036 First SBIC of California, P.O. Box 2097, Term. Annex, Los Angeles, CA 90054 City Capital Corp.,9255 Sundet Blvd.,Los Angeles, CA 90069 Havard SBIC, 33 E. Huntington Dr.,Arcadia, CA 91006 Fresno SBIC, 5300 N. Fresno St.,Fresno, CA 91006 Roe Financial Corp.,6100 Kester Ave.,Van Nuys, CA 91401 Downtown Investment Com. 2501 Judah St.,San Francisco, CA 94112 Central Investment Com.,2272 Market St.,San Francisco, CA 94114 Walker States SBIC, 320 Pershing Dr.,Oakland, CA 94611 Merchants Equity Com. 1024 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 First Farwest Capital Fund, Inc.,1800 S.W. First, Portland, OR 97034 Oregon SBIC, 661 High St.,N.E.,Salem, OR 97301 Model Capital Corp.,105 14th Ave.,Seattle, WA 98122 PERSONAL AND DEBT LOAN COMPANIES Following is a list of companies that give personal debt consolidation loans. some of these companies can offer you unsecured loans through the mail, with no investigations. You can even get a loan for more than $25,000 with your signature as collateral. American Express Credit Corp.,401 Hackensack Ave.,Hackensack, NJ 07601 Diners Club, Inc.,10 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019 General Electric Credit Corp.,570 Lexington Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Commercial Credit Corporation, 55 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10022 C.I.T. Financial Coorporation, 650 Madison Ave.,New York, NY 10022 Westinghouse Credit Corp.,933 Penn Ave.,Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Allstate financial Corp.,P.O. Box 2303, Wilmington, DE 19899 Sears Roebuch Acceptance Corp.,P.O. Box 2028, Wilmington, DE 19899 Associates Financial Service Corp.,1030 East Jefferson Blvd.,South Bend, IN 26617 CreditThrift Financial Corp.,601 N.W. 2nd St.,Evansville, IN 47701 S.F.C., 1561 South Green River Rd.,Evansville, IN 47715 Chrysler financial Corp.,900 Tower Dr.,Southfield, MI 48098 Amoco Credit Corp.,P.O. Box 9014, Des Moines, IA 50306 Dial Finance, 418 Seventh Street, Des Moines, IA 50390 Postal Thrift Loans, P.O. Box 448, Sioux City, IA 51102 Honeywell Finance Corporation, Honeywell Plaza, Minneapolis, MN 55408 General Finance Corporation, 1301 Central Ave.,Evanston, IL 60201 Household Finance Corporation, 130 East Randolph Dr.,Chicago, IL 60601 Bankers Investment Co.,Bankers Investment Bldg.,Hutchinson, KS 67501 GAC Executive Service Corp.,2917 South Western Ave.,Oklahoma City, OK 73109 Allied Finance Corporation, P.O. Box 2998, Dallas, TX 75221 Western Industrial Bank, 2777 South Colorado Blvd.,Denver, CO 80202 Nationwide Finance Corporation, 1660 South Albion St.,Denver, CO 80222 Thomas Knight financial Assoc.,American Building, Ste 245, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 Whitney Harris financial Oppor.,6800 First Security Bldg.,.salt Lake City, UT 84101 Transamerica Financial Corp.,1150 South Olive Street, Los Angeles, CA 90015 Avco Colorado Industrial Bank, P.O. Box 31225, Los Angeles, CA 90031 Carte Blanche Corporation, 3460 Wilshire Blvd.,Los Angeles, CA 90054 Capital Finance Services, 1930 South Hill Street, Oceanside, CA 92054 Avco Financial Corporation, 620 Newport left Dr.,Newport Beach, CA 95128 Beneficial Executive Ln.Ser.,2828 Stevens Creek Blvd.,San Jose, CA 95128 Northwest Acceptance Corporation, P.O. Box 14490, Portland, OR 97214 Site Sponsors




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